There are several trading cards depicting either Captain Universe himself or Spider-Man as Captain Universe, these trading card sets include Marvel VS., Marvel Overpower, the Fleer Mark Bagley Spider-Man Card Set and Fleer Ultra 1994. There was also a special Captain Universe trading card included with the personalized X-Men/Captain Universe comic depicting the comic book owner's personal stats as Captain Universe.[31]

^ Jump up to: a b c Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 59. ISBN 978-0756692360. In the first issue of The Amazing Spider-Man to be written by someone other than Stan Lee...Thomas also managed to introduce a major new player to Spidey's life - the scientifically created vampire known as Morbius.

When Classi reaches the back door of Buca de Faggoncini to hide, a mobster kills Captain Diabetes, who is only revived by a sudden "glitch" in time initiated by the New Kid. Calling in backup, they are joined by their allies in fighting the chefs of the restaurant, soon discovering a room full of cats in cat carriers and another group of mobsters, who are only taken out by Red Wine Drunk Randy Marsh, desperately looking for his keys. As Randy is defeated, Coon and Friends manages to capture Classi.
Eerder dit jaar zeiden we het al: het chatbot-tijdperk neemt een vlucht in 2018. De typische vraag-antwoord-bots kennen we inmiddels allemaal. Maar de vraag is waar de kansen van AI liggen bij ‘complex’ klantcontact, bijvoorbeeld in geval van een klacht, technisch support of voor aankoopadvies. Consumenten willen veelal goed, snel en persoonlijk geholpen worden, maar welke rol...

Jump up ^ "Night of Light Beginnings". Cor et Lumen Christi Community. Archived from the original on 23 October 2013. Retrieved 2 November 2012. In its first year – 2000 AD – over 1000 people participated from several countries. This included special All Saints Vigil masses, extended periods of Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament and parties for children. In our second year 10,000 participated. Since these modest beginnings, the Night of Light has been adopted in many countries around the world with vast numbers involved each year from a Cathedral in India to a convent in New Zealand; from Churches in the USA and Europe to Africa; in Schools, churches, homes and church halls all ages have got involved. Although it began in the Catholic Church it has been taken up be other Christians who while keeping its essentials have adapted it to suit their own traditions.


"I had blinders on, I didn't want to see it," Luann said. She told Dorinda that Tom D'Agostino got worse when they got married. He was going out, meeting with old girlfriends—basically everything he was doing before he got married. "After a certain amount of time, everything the girls were saying was kind of true," Luann said. "Ultimately for me the last straw was the lack of respect…It didn't stop and I couldn't breathe…I was drowning. I suffered a lot, I really suffered a lot."
Spider-Man versus his most implacable enemy! Norman Osborn is a respected businessman, the owner of several companies, including the New York Daily Bugle. He is also secretly the super-villain known as the Green Goblin--a foe who has turned Spider-Man's life upside down more than once, and one who knows that Spider-Man is really Peter Parker! Osborn's latest scheme is his most ambitious yet: to make himself mayor of New York. But where many see that as a laudable goal, Spider-Man knows that Osborn's goal is nothing less than absolute power. Spider-Man can defeat the Green Goblin, but Osborn refuses to act himself, preferring to remain above the fray and let the mercenaries known as the Rat Pack do his dirty work. The wall-crawler must find a way to stop Osborn's machinations before it's too late!
The police, led by Jean DeWolff, arrive too late to save Spider-Man from a massive beating but in time to kill Sandman. The Crime Master escapes, but Spider-Man has managed to link him with TFONG. A severely injured Spider-Man goes to Felicia to recover. The following day she forces him to leave before the arrival of her other man — the unmasked Crime Master. Felicia questions him too much, and he determines that she has been seeing Spider-Man. In fury, he attacks her with a shard of mirror. He gets a call from the leader of TFONG, telling him to shut Ellis Island down before they all get caught. Spider-Man goes to Ellis Island himself and finds Robbie, but was too late as Octavius had already drilled into his frontal lobe, leaving him motionless.[7]
Luke Cage and Ratchet came to his rescue, but were promptly defeated by the charged-up Megatron. Man and Machine, Part Three However, after Megatron left to deal with the attacking Avengers and Autobots outside, Spider-Man proved he still had enough strength to burst out of his restraints. After meeting with Ratchet and Prowl, he agreed to power them up using Megatron's device as well. Ultimately, he didn't have to sacrifice even more blood, though, as Wolverine offered to take his place. Spider-Man followed Ratchet and Prowl outside, where he webbed up Megatron in an attempt to stop him from escaping. It ultimately failed, but at least he made the Decepticon leader look mighty silly as he lay tied up and helpless on the ground! After everything was wrapped up, Spidey and the other Avengers returned home on the Quinjet. Man and Machine, Part Four
In a parking lot, Spider-Man webbed Davis's hand onto his car bonnet, but Davis poked fun at Spider-Man for using a voice filter. Flustered, Spider-Man disabled the Enhanced Interrogation Protocol and asked for Vulture's location. Davis, grateful for Spider-Man's intervention several nights earlier, informed him of another weapons deal to be made on Staten Island Ferry.[2]
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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