Spider-Man has appeared in comics, cartoons, films, video games, coloring books, novels, records, and children's books.[159] On television, he first starred in the ABC animated series Spider-Man (1967–1970);[185] Spidey Super Stories (1974-1977) on PBS; and the CBS live action series The Amazing Spider-Man (1978–1979), starring Nicholas Hammond. Other animated series featuring the superhero include the syndicated Spider-Man (1981–1982), Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends (1981–1983), Fox Kids' Spider-Man (1994–1998), Spider-Man Unlimited (1999–2000), Spider-Man: The New Animated Series (2003), The Spectacular Spider-Man (2008–2009), and Ultimate Spider-Man (2012–2017).[186]

In the episode "Traction," the Batman is badly injured by the immensely powerful Bane, due to which he is forced to build a prototype called the "Batbot" to battle the villain. Bruce Wayne controls the Batbot while sitting inside the cockpit. It is shown to possess the superhuman strength to match that of Bane, along with enhanced levels of agility and endurance. It has two turbos retro-thrusters flight on its back as well. The Batbot is also shown to be controlled via the Batman's utility belt (for example, in "The Cat and the Bat" episode).
A folk costume (also regional costume, national costume, or traditional garment) expresses an identity through costume, which is usually associated with a geographic area or a period of time in history. It can also indicate social, marital or religious status. If the costume is used to represent the culture or identity of a specific ethnic group, it is usually known as ethnic costume (also ethnic dress, ethnic wear, ethnic clothing, traditional ethnic wear or traditional ethnic garment). Such costumes often come in two forms: one for everyday occasions, the other for traditional festivals and formal wear.

. The story begins with Peter already having his Spider powers and is a part-time photographer for the Daily Bugle. Spider-Man would battle many classic villains and newer villains such as Green Goblin (Norman and Harry Osborn), Hobgoblin, the Chameleon, the Lizard, the Scorpion, Doctor Octopus, Mysterio, Rhino, the Kingpin of Crime, the Shocker, Vulture, Venom, and Carnage. Peter would eventually get into a romantic relationship with Felicia Hardy/Black Cat, and eventually fall for Mary Jane Watson. Although Gwen Stacy was never in the series, Marvel gave us a little teaser in the series finale story arc, having Spider-Man go to an alternate universe and meeting Gwen Stacy herself. A very important story arc in this series began as the finale of Season 3 in the episode entitled "Turning Point." In which the Green Goblin kidnaps Mary Jane and throws her off the George Washington Bridge, similar to the story arc "The Night Gwen Stacy Died." However, with the heavy censorship in the 1990s not allowing television to have heavy violence, death being a part of it. Marvel decided to have Mary Jane and the Green Goblin fall into an inter-dimension vortex instead. Season 4 was mostly about the guilt that Spider-Man has to carry for losing Mary Jane. He tries to rebound with the Black Cat, but Mary Jane eventually mysteriously returns to life. Season 5 starts off with the much anticipated Wedding of Peter Parker and Mary Jane Watson-Parker. With season 5 being the last season, Marvel dropped a bomb on us by revealing that Mary Jane was actually a clone created by Dr. Miles Warren.


Peter's first super-villain confrontation was with a communist spy called the Chameleon who could disguise himself as anyone. He attempted to disguise himself as Spider-Man and steal some important documents but he was defeated by the debuting hero, restoring his good name. Peter went on to get a job at the Daily Bugle as a photographer, selling photos to J. Jonah Jameson even though they were usually used against him. He eventually fought his second super villain, The Vulture. Due to his inexperience, Spider-Man was defeated but when the villain got cocky, Spider-Man used a gadget of his own to defeat The Vulture. Spider-Man then had his first confrontation with his most dangerous villain yet, the tentacled madman known as Doctor Octopus. Spider-Man was defeated by the more powerful Doctor Octopus in their initial encounter which caused Peter to doubt himself for the first time. He was encouraged by a speech given by the Human Torch to keep on fighting. Spider-Man managed to defeat the villain by knocking him out with one punch to the jaw, since Ock's powers came only from his tentacles. He would follow up this victory by fighting the shape shifting Sandman, the lethal Lizard, who is actually Peter's mentor and friend Curt Connors, the Enforcers, Electro, Mysterio, Kraven the Hunter, Doctor Doom, and his soon to-be arch-nemesis the Green Goblin.
The Iron Spider armor appears in the Ultimate Spider-Man animated series. It is initially used by Peter Parker in the episodes "Flight of the Iron Spider", "The Iron Octopus" and "Venom Bomb". Subsequent seasons depict the armor in the hands of Amadeus Cho under the Iron Spider mantle. Additionally the episode "Rampaging Rhino" features a variant Iron Spider Hulkbuster created by Curt Connors at the time when the Hulk fights with the Rhino.

The police, led by Jean DeWolff, arrive too late to save Spider-Man from a massive beating but in time to kill Sandman. The Crime Master escapes, but Spider-Man has managed to link him with TFONG. A severely injured Spider-Man goes to Felicia to recover. The following day she forces him to leave before the arrival of her other man — the unmasked Crime Master. Felicia questions him too much, and he determines that she has been seeing Spider-Man. In fury, he attacks her with a shard of mirror. He gets a call from the leader of TFONG, telling him to shut Ellis Island down before they all get caught. Spider-Man goes to Ellis Island himself and finds Robbie, but was too late as Octavius had already drilled into his frontal lobe, leaving him motionless.[7]


With help from the Invisible Woman and some of her husband's technology, Spider-Man kidnaps and imprisons Mac Gargan, (they ambushed him in an alleyway, caught him in an invisible force-field, all while Bullseye picks and eats a bogey) then poses as him to infiltrate Avengers Tower, donning a special suit made by Reed Richards, allowing him to appear as Mac Gargan with the Venom symbiote. Norman has revealed a nefarious plot to his Avengers involving his son Harry entitled "American Son". While alone, Spider-Man was ambushed by Daken, who claims that Peter smells too clean for Gargan. Daken attacks and uses his pheromones to shut down Peter's senses, however Peter focuses on his spider-sense alone, and eventually defeats Daken by throwing him into an electrical machine that electrocutes and knocks out Daken. However, Harry reveals Spider-Man's disguise in front of Osborn's Avengers,(even though Norman had known it all along, and only wanted to ensure he had his son's trust) and he was held captive and tortured by Bullseye. Identity intact thanks to his unstabilized mask, he escaped (subduing Norman and Bullseye in succession out of anger). Unfortunately Spider-Man was weakened by captivity, saved from Norman by a guilt-ridden and angry Harry, who now knew the truth about his father's relationship with Lily Hollister (Harry's girlfriend,) and began using the American Son Armor to beat up Norman. Peter watched the Osborns fight until Menace became involved, whom he incapacitated. With Harry victorious, Spider-Man convinced him not to kill Norman as it was exactly what the madman wanted.
Someone was probably smoking spinach when they suggested that Popeye was the first superhero. As the “Men of Tomorrow” book makes clear, the precursors to Superman and Batman were Doc Savage and The Shadow, created in the Street and Smith pulp magazines of the early ’30s. It is interesting to note that DC Comics currently plans to return its universe to its early roots and purge all magical powers from their characters, leaving Wonder Woman in limbo it would seem.
There’s a related question that has some bearing on the answer to the above question: what is a superhero? There have probably been books (or at least extensive Usenet threads) written on this topic, but a good baseline definition needs to acknowledge both the “super” and the “hero” parts. That is, the person needs to have some superhuman power or powers and has to fight the bad guys. But this basic definition is flawed. Superman is an alien, not human. Batman doesn’t have any super powers…he’s a self-made superhero like Syndrome in The Incredibles. Or can a superhero be anyone (human or no) that fights bad guys and is superior to normal heroes…the cream of the hero crop? And what about a costume or alter ego…are they essential for superheroism? These are all questions well-suited for asking the internet, so have at it: what’s a good definition for a superhero?

Following Davis's lead, Spider-Man sneaked into the ferry and went looking for the Vulture. During his scouting, Stark called him, but Spider-Man hung up on him to focus on his targets. Spider-Man interrupted the deal and defeated Vulture's gang and Mac Gargan, but the FBI interrupted Spider-Man's ambush and proceeded to arrest everyone at the scene.

The custom of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.[25] In 19th century America, Halloween was often celebrated with costume parades and "licentious revelries".[26] However, efforts were made to "domesticate" the festival to conform with Victorian era morality. Halloween was made into a private rather than public holiday, celebrations involving liquor and sensuality de-emphasized, and only children were expected to celebrate the festival.[27] Early Halloween costumes emphasized the gothic nature of Halloween, and were aimed primarily at children. Costumes were also made at home, or using items (such as make-up) which could be purchased and utilized to create a costume. But in the 1930s, A.S. Fishbach, Ben Cooper, Inc., and other firms began mass-producing Halloween costumes for sale in stores as trick-or-treating became popular in North America. Halloween costumes are often designed to imitate supernatural and scary beings. Costumes are traditionally those of monsters such as vampires, werewolves, zombies, ghosts,[28] skeletons, witches, goblins, trolls, devils, etc. or in more recent years such science fiction-inspired characters as aliens and superheroes. There are also costumes of pop culture figures like presidents, athletes, celebrities, or characters in film, television, literature, etc. Another popular trend is for women (and in some cases, men) to use Halloween as an excuse to wear sexy or revealing costumes, showing off more skin than would be socially acceptable otherwise.[29] Young girls also often dress as entirely non-scary characters at Halloween, including princesses, fairies, angels, cute animals and flowers.
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