In 2010, a stage musical entitled Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark opened on Broadway, with music by Bono and the edge and writing by Julie Taymor. The musical was wrought with problems from the very beginning, with multiple injuries happening to actors on the set, and a total cost of 75 million dollars for the production. After opening for previews, the show received many terrible reviews, and was temporarily shut down for rewrites.
The film was a hit at the box office, and as a result, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 was released in 2014. The film featured the return of most of the original cast, as well as new faces like Jamie Foxx as Max Dillon/Electro, Dane DeHaan as Harry Osborn/Green Goblin and Paul Giamatti as Aleksei Sytsevich/The Rhino. While the movie was a modest financial success, it was heavily panned by critics and made less at the box office than its predecessor. Despite plans for a third movie and a host of spin-offs (including a solo Venom movie, a female-led team movie featuring characters like Silver Sable, Black Cat, Spider-Gwen, Stunner and Lightbrght, and a Sinister Six movie) , the decision was made to discontinue the franchise.
Born to Richard and Mary Parker in Queens, New York, Peter Parker lost his parents at a very young age when their plane went down overseas while they were on a mission as government spies. He was raised by his aunt and uncle (May and Ben Parker) who, along with his teachers at Midtown High School, thought he had a bright future due to his affinity for science. However, Peter struggled with bullies and being teased for his introverted nature (sometimes referring to him as a "professional wallflower") and interest in science that pegged him as a teacher's pet.

As part of the Avengers, Spider-Man traveled to Latveria to investigate Doctor Doom's apparent attack on the neighboring country, Symkaria. Upon arrival, he and his fellow heroes found a dome-shaped structure emitting radiation and broke into it. Inside the building, they came under attack from automated laser turrets, and while Spider-Man was busy webbing them up and cracking jokes, he was suddenly electrocuted into submission and kidnapped by Runabout. When he regained consciousness, he found himself strapped to a table by a giant robot named Megatron, who explained that the hero was about to help him and his Decepticons conquer the world. Man and Machine, Part One Megatron began extracting Spider-Man's radioactive blood, refining it into a powerful energon isotope that he used to supercharge his troops. All Spidey could do was lay there and weakly taunt him. Man and Machine, Part Two
The custom of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.[25] In 19th century America, Halloween was often celebrated with costume parades and "licentious revelries".[26] However, efforts were made to "domesticate" the festival to conform with Victorian era morality. Halloween was made into a private rather than public holiday, celebrations involving liquor and sensuality de-emphasized, and only children were expected to celebrate the festival.[27] Early Halloween costumes emphasized the gothic nature of Halloween, and were aimed primarily at children. Costumes were also made at home, or using items (such as make-up) which could be purchased and utilized to create a costume. But in the 1930s, A.S. Fishbach, Ben Cooper, Inc., and other firms began mass-producing Halloween costumes for sale in stores as trick-or-treating became popular in North America. Halloween costumes are often designed to imitate supernatural and scary beings. Costumes are traditionally those of monsters such as vampires, werewolves, zombies, ghosts,[28] skeletons, witches, goblins, trolls, devils, etc. or in more recent years such science fiction-inspired characters as aliens and superheroes. There are also costumes of pop culture figures like presidents, athletes, celebrities, or characters in film, television, literature, etc. Another popular trend is for women (and in some cases, men) to use Halloween as an excuse to wear sexy or revealing costumes, showing off more skin than would be socially acceptable otherwise.[29] Young girls also often dress as entirely non-scary characters at Halloween, including princesses, fairies, angels, cute animals and flowers.
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