Spider-Man is one of the most popular and commercially successful superheroes.[11] As Marvel's flagship character and company mascot, he has appeared in countless forms of media, including several animated and live action television series, syndicated newspaper comic strips, and in a series of films. The character was first portrayed in live action by Danny Seagren in Spidey Super Stories, a The Electric Company skit which ran from 1974 to 1977.[12] In films, Spider-Man has been portrayed by actors Tobey Maguire (2002–2007), Andrew Garfield (2012–2014),[13] and Tom Holland (2016–present), who has portrayed the character in the Marvel Cinematic Universe since 2016. Reeve Carney starred as Spider-Man in the 2010 Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark.[14] Spider-Man has been well received as a superhero and comic book character, and he is often ranked as one of the most popular comic book characters of all time, alongside DC Comics' most famous superheroes, Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman.
Gabriel : Gwen's son by Norman Osborn. Norman convinced Gabriel and his sister, Sarah, that Peter Parker was their father and had killed their mother. Although Sarah is persuaded otherwise, Gabriel continues to believe so and takes on the identity of the "Gray" Goblin. After a confrontation with Spider-Man, he crashed into the river on his glider and lost his memories. Sarah took him to their home in France to recover. After failing to convince Sarah to join him, he flies off on a different glider. Introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man #509.

O LORD our God, increase, we pray thee, and multiply upon us the gifts of thy grace: that we, who do prevent the glorious festival of all thy Saints, may of thee be enabled joyfully to follow them in all virtuous and godly living. Through Jesus Christ, Our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Ghost, ever one God, world without end. Amen. —Collect of the Vigil of All Saints, The Anglican Breviary[209]
Nevertheless, variations on the term "Super Hero" are jointly claimed by DC Comics and Marvel Comics as trademarks in the United States. Registrations of "Super Hero" marks have been maintained by DC and Marvel since the 1960s,[45] including U.S. Trademark Serial Nos. 72243225 and 73222079. In 2009, the term "Super Heroes" was registered as a typography-independent "descriptive" US trademark co-owned by DC and Marvel.[46] Both DC Comics and Marvel Comics have been assiduous in protecting their rights in the "Super Hero" trademarks in jurisdictions where the registrations are in force, including the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia, and including in respect of various goods and services falling outside comic book publications.[47]
Of course, Marty went to the past and then Back to the Future, and if you're all about this top franchise of the 80s, you're going to want to set your sights on this Marty costume from the first movie. With the shirt, jacket, and vest (that looks suspiciously like a life preserver to the people of 1955), this costume set also includes some cool prop accessories that are sure to make you feel like a resident of Hill Valley—in any era!
If your son lives and breathes video games, he’ll love Spirit’s boys gaming Halloween costumes for 2018! If he can’t get enough of Assassin’s Creed, he can dress as Ezio, in his hooded jacket along with chest belt, cape, glove and gauntlet. He’ll be able to connect with his fellow gamers and tell who’s also a fan when he wears a costume that looks like it walked out of the game, like our blue and yellow Fallout Vault Boy costume. No matter how many parties he goes to or how many houses he stops at to get candy, he’ll always look the best when he’s wearing one of Spirit’s officially licensed Fortnite Halloween costumes! Dressing in a Stormtrooper costume or Brite Bomber costume will really make him stand out in the crowd. Accessorize this awesome Halloween costume with tons of Fortnite weapons and accessories. The Pumpkin Launcher and Boogie Bomb both light up and have sounds, so you’ll really be able to bring the video game to life!

The following activities were a common feature of Halloween in Ireland and Britain during the 17th–20th centuries. Some have become more widespread and continue to be popular today. One common game is apple bobbing or dunking (which may be called "dooking" in Scotland)[165] in which apples float in a tub or a large basin of water and the participants must use only their teeth to remove an apple from the basin. A variant of dunking involves kneeling on a chair, holding a fork between the teeth and trying to drive the fork into an apple. Another common game involves hanging up treacle or syrup-coated scones by strings; these must be eaten without using hands while they remain attached to the string, an activity that inevitably leads to a sticky face. Another once-popular game involves hanging a small wooden rod from the ceiling at head height, with a lit candle on one end and an apple hanging from the other. The rod is spun round and everyone takes turns to try to catch the apple with their teeth.[166]


Spider-Man crashed into the lake, got tangled in his parachute underwater, and nearly drowned. Iron Man retrieved him with a remotely controlled armor, and explained that he installed a tracker into Parker's suit, allowing Stark to observe Parker. Parker explained the situation to him, but Stark urged Parker to forget the Vulture and let more experienced people handle the Vulture's activity.[2]
Spider-Man is a fictional superhero in the Marvel Universe debuting in the anthology comic book series issue Amazing Fantasy #15 (August 1962) in the Silver Age of Comics published by Marvel Comics. After his debut he would get his own comic book entitled The Amazing Spider-Man. The comic book series would introduce many of what would become his major supervillain adversaries. Spider-Man would then be popular enough for more Spider-Man comic spinoffs (The Spectacular Spider-Man, Marvel Team-Up, Web of Spider-Man, Peter Parker: Spider-Man etc.) which introduced more recurring enemies of the web-slinger.
Both major publishers began introducing new superheroines with a more distinct feminist theme as part of their origin stories or character development. Examples include Big Barda, Power Girl, and the Huntress by DC comics; and from Marvel, the second Black Widow, Shanna the She-Devil, and The Cat.[32] Female supporting characters who were successful professionals or hold positions of authority in their own right also debuted in the pages of several popular superhero titles from the late 1950s onward: Hal Jordan's love interest Carol Ferris was introduced as the Vice-President of Ferris Aircraft and later took over the company from her father; Medusa, who was first introduced in the Fantastic Four series, is a member of the Inhuman Royal Family and a prominent statesperson within her people's quasi-feudal society; and Carol Danvers, a decorated officer in the United States Air Force who would become a costumed superhero herself years later.
Peter Parker's re-emerged consciousness begins to explore his Mindscape, discovering the world is now a large empty space, with only the very few key memories left. Recalling that he's more than Peter Parker, he is Spider-Man, he declares that Otto had made a big mistake in leaving the memories that define him and promises to find a way to regain the control of his body. Continuing to explore the Mindscape for clues into reclaiming his body from Doctor Octopus, he makes a note that only 31 pieces of his memories are left and wonders what he can do with them. Just then, he stumbles upon the memory of his fight with the Green Goblin at the Brooklyn Bridge, wonders why Doctor Octopus is probing into this. Deciding to delve into Doctor Octopus's memories for a way out, he is overwhelmed by the amount of memories and struggles to hold on. He sees a bright light and witnesses the moment of Otto Octavius's birth. Peter Parker's consciousness struggles to fight against the deluge of Doctor Octopus' memories, but it proves too much and he convinces himself that he is Doctor Octopus merging with Otto's memories.
The Mutant X version of Spider-Man diverges from his mainstream counterpart in Amazing Spider-Man #102, in that he was unable or unwilling to cure himself of having six arms. For unexplained reasons, he reverses his name to Man-Spider. A third divergence occurs when he and his clone continue to coexist after the end of the original Clone Saga. The two keep this a secret by taking care to never appear in public at the same time,[19] but "Man-Spider" is forced to admit the truth after his clone is killed by Madelyne Pryor.[20] He himself is later killed.[21]

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Categories: Marvel Comics superheroesSpider-Man1962 comics debutsAmerican superheroesCharacters created by Stan LeeCharacters created by Steve DitkoChild superheroesComics adapted into animated seriesComics adapted into playsComics adapted into radio seriesComics adapted into television seriesComics adapted into video gamesComics by Stan LeeComics by Steve DitkoComics characters introduced in 1962Comics set in New York CityFictional adopteesFictional business executivesFictional characters from New York CityFictional characters with precognitionFictional characters with superhuman sensesFictional college studentsFictional inventorsFictional orphansFictional photographersFictional reportersFictional schoolteachersFictional scientistsFictional stalking victimsFictional victims of bulliesFictional vigilantesExperimental medical treatments in fictionMale characters in comicsMarvel Comics adapted into filmsMarvel Comics characters who can move at superhuman speedsMarvel Comics characters with accelerated healingMarvel Comics characters with superhuman strengthMarvel Comics martial artistsMarvel Comics mutatesMarvel Comics television charactersMarvel vs. Capcom fightersSpider-Man charactersSpiders in popular cultureSuperheroes who are adoptedSuperhero film charactersTeenage characters in filmTeenage characters in comicsSuperheroes with alter egosVideo game guest characters

Following the disappointing response to The Amazing Spider-Man 2, it was announced that Sony would be partnering with Marvel studios to incorporate the Spider-Man franchise into the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The rebooted Spider-Man debuted in Captain America: Civil War, before being spun off into his own movie in 2017, with Peter portrayed by Tom Holland.
The Uni-Power is an extra-dimensional force that possesses an individual (or on one occasion, twins) in a time of crisis, transforming that person into Captain Universe. As Captain Universe, the transformed person typically retains his or her original personality and appearance, though with Captain Universe's costume and heroic traits superimposed over the original. The Uni-Power itself emanates from the Enigma Force, the exact nature of which, naturally, remains an enigma. It is believed, however, to be connected to the Microverse, home of the Micronauts. Although the Uni-Power typically empowers normal, non-super-powered humans, it has in the past empowered Doctor Strange, Spider-Man, Commander Arcturus Rann of the Micronauts, a toddler, and a dog, among others. Its counterparts in various alternate timelines have also possessed Mar-Vell, Mr. Fantastic, a member of the alien Badoon race, a Doombot and Quasar. Because of its never-ending supply of energy it has been the target of many individuals, terrorist groups and peacekeeping agencies such as AIM, the Psycho-Man, Doctor Doom and even S.H.I.E.L.D.
From 1984 to 1988, Spider-Man wore a black costume with a white spider design on his chest. The new costume originated in the Secret Wars limited series, on an alien planet where Spider-Man participates in a battle between Earth's major superheroes and villains.[65] He continues wearing the costume when he returns, starting in The Amazing Spider-Man #252. The change to a longstanding character's design met with controversy, "with many hardcore comics fans decrying it as tantamount to sacrilege. Spider-Man's traditional red and blue costume was iconic, they argued, on par with those of his D.C. rivals Superman and Batman."[66] The creators then revealed the costume was an alien symbiote which Spider-Man is able to reject after a difficult struggle,[67] though the symbiote returns several times as Venom for revenge.[49]
In 2008, Marvel announced plans to release a series of educational comics the following year in partnership with the United Nations, depicting Spider-Man alongside UN Peacekeeping Forces to highlight UN peacekeeping missions.[168] A BusinessWeek article listed Spider-Man as one of the top ten most intelligent fictional characters in American comics.[169]
Quick background on me: I'm a leading admin on four different wikis (including Final Fantasy Wiki and Ratchet & Clank Wiki), and have been editing dozens of wikis for almost ten years now. As I'm a huge fan of Insomniac Games, and really excited for Marvel's Spider-Man on PS4, I decided to apply the skills I built over the years, along with my friend u/Jak_Himself (from the Jak and Daxter Wiki), to develop what will hopefully be the official wiki for the upcoming game!

In subsequent decades, popular characters like Dazzler, She-Hulk, Elektra, Catwoman, Witchblade, Spider-Girl, Batgirl and the Birds of Prey became stars of long-running eponymous titles. Female characters began assuming leadership roles in many ensemble superhero teams; the Uncanny X-Men series and its related spin-off titles in particular have included many female characters in pivotal roles since the 1970s.[33] Volume 4 of the X-Men comic book series featured an all-female team as part of the Marvel NOW! branding initiative in 2013.[34] Superpowered female characters like Buffy the Vampire Slayer[35] and Darna[36][37] have a tremendous influence on popular culture in their respective countries of origin.

All this is, I feel, a bit part of what feeds into making a hero a superhero in our minds - when they become larger than life, existing outside the boundaries that we normally exist in. Ironically, history in real life has probably seen more “super villains” than real super heroes; it’s much more tempting to human weakness and easier, to go outside the normal boundaries and cause harm or perform selfish acts. Many of the colorful supervillains from comic books, especially Batman’s rogue gallery of criminals, are not very far removed in some cases from the activities of real life villains who are epic in scope.
The thousands of Halloween postcards produced between the turn of the 20th century and the 1920s commonly show children but not trick-or-treating.[149] Trick-or-treating does not seem to have become a widespread practice until the 1930s, with the first U.S. appearances of the term in 1934,[150] and the first use in a national publication occurring in 1939.[151]
The custom of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.[25] In 19th century America, Halloween was often celebrated with costume parades and "licentious revelries".[26] However, efforts were made to "domesticate" the festival to conform with Victorian era morality. Halloween was made into a private rather than public holiday, celebrations involving liquor and sensuality de-emphasized, and only children were expected to celebrate the festival.[27] Early Halloween costumes emphasized the gothic nature of Halloween, and were aimed primarily at children. Costumes were also made at home, or using items (such as make-up) which could be purchased and utilized to create a costume. But in the 1930s, A.S. Fishbach, Ben Cooper, Inc., and other firms began mass-producing Halloween costumes for sale in stores as trick-or-treating became popular in North America. Halloween costumes are often designed to imitate supernatural and scary beings. Costumes are traditionally those of monsters such as vampires, werewolves, zombies, ghosts,[28] skeletons, witches, goblins, trolls, devils, etc. or in more recent years such science fiction-inspired characters as aliens and superheroes. There are also costumes of pop culture figures like presidents, athletes, celebrities, or characters in film, television, literature, etc. Another popular trend is for women (and in some cases, men) to use Halloween as an excuse to wear sexy or revealing costumes, showing off more skin than would be socially acceptable otherwise.[29] Young girls also often dress as entirely non-scary characters at Halloween, including princesses, fairies, angels, cute animals and flowers.
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