When they finally reach the base, Chameleon reveals himself as being disguised as Ezekiel the entire time. Spider-man then gets ambushed and killed by the Kravinoff's. With Kraven finally back from the dead, he shows his anger at Sasha by confirming that the blood was not that of the real Spider-Man but of his clone Kaine. When Peter awakens, he finds Kaine's body in a coffin with a note reading "Hunt me" and his black costume lying beside the coffin. Spider-Man begins to hunt the Kravinoff's one by one, first taking out Chameleon and nearly killing Vladimir with a giant tombstone before dodging a point-blank shot from Alyosha's rifle. Spider-man than appears on the roof of the mansion and attacks Sasha, leaving the mark of Kaine on her face (using his finger's abilities to rip the skin off of her face) in revenge for the death of his clone and "brother". Spider-Man and Kraven then proceed to engage into battle and the fight proves to be completely one-sided as Peter goes all out with the intentions of killing Kraven for the murders of his friends. As he is about to deliver the killing blow to Kraven with his own spear, Arachne (As the new Madame Web) appears and shows Spider-man a grim future that would follow if he decided to murder Kraven. Spider-Man lets Kraven live and tells him that it's his second and last chance to live.
The practice may have originated in a Celtic festival, held on 31 October–1 November, to mark the beginning of winter. It was called Samhain in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, and Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Cornwall and Brittany. The festival is believed to have pre-Christian roots. After the Christianization of Ireland in the 5th century, some of these customs may have been retained in the Christian observance of All Hallows' Eve in that region—which continued to be called Samhain/Calan Gaeaf—blending the traditions of their ancestors with Christian ones.[2][3] It was seen as a liminal time, when the spirits or fairies (the Aos Sí), and the souls of the dead, could more easily come into our world.[4] It was believed that the Aos Sí needed to be propitiated to ensure that the people and their livestock survived the winter.
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