While trying to stop a robbery, Spider-Man is blamed for the accidental shooting of an innocent bystander. This makes the web-slinger the perfect target for anti-super hero mayoral candidate Brian Timilty. However, Timilty is secretly the pawn of Tyler Stewart, a wealthy businessman seeking to take over New York's crime syndicates. Wanted by police and forced into hiding, Spider-Man must find a way to clear his name without being shot on sight. And that's when Electro and Rhino--two of his deadliest foes--arrive on the scene to complicate matters.
During the Halloween seasonal event, which lasts from October 20th   / October 1st until November 1   / November 10th   , several enemies wear costumes that change their appearance, unique enemies spawn, and new items become available via enemy drops or via purchase. Goodie Bags also drop, offering random Halloween-themed items, mostly decorative or vanity.
On Earth-50701 Spider-Man is abducted by an alien scientist and injected with a mysterious drug that corrupts him and causes him to attack fellow abductee The Thing. He is attacked by the Human Torch and Storm, both also corrupted, and in the scuffle is wounded, causing him to bleed the drug out of his system, returning him to normal. He is returned home, and later joins other heroes in fighting the scientist's Imperfects and their invasion attempts.
Costumes are popularly employed at sporting events, during which fans dress as their team's representative mascot to show their support. Businesses use mascot costumes to bring in people to their business either by placing their mascot in the street by their business or sending their mascot out to sporting events, festivals, national celebrations, fairs, and parades. Mascots appear at organizations wanting to raise awareness of their work. Children's Book authors create mascots from the main character to present at their book signings. Animal costumes that are visually very similar to mascot costumes are also popular among the members of the furry fandom, where the costumes are referred to as fursuits and match one's animal persona, or "fursona".

The Toei Company had made a television series based on Marvel's famous hero as a tokusatsu in Japan. Even though the powers and costume are the same; the man behind the mask was a young motorcycle rider named Takuya Yamashiro who instead of getting bitten by a radioactive spider follows his archaeologist father and discovers a UFO called "Marveller" from the planet "Spider". When his father was killed exploring the ship, Takuya meets the lone survivor from Spider. It gives him a bracelet that not only grants him the same costume and the same powers as the American version but it also allows him to summon a giant robot (which looks an awful lot like a Power Ranger zord) to fight the evil of Professor Monster and his monstrous minions. The series lasted 41 episodes and is available in streaming video on Marvel's website.


In 1962, Marvel Comics editor and head writer Stan Lee was looking for a new superhero idea. He decided to create Spider-Man as a character with whom teens could identify, as there was a recent surge in teenage demand for comics. Lee was supposedly inspired for the concept of Spider-Man after observing a spider climb up a wall. Lee had to convince publisher Martin Goodman to introduce Spider-Man in the last issue of the canceled series Amazing Adult Fantasy, which was renamed Amazing Fantasy for that issue (#15, Aug. 1962). Lee then approached legendary artist Jack Kirby for an initial character design. However Lee was dissatisfied with Kirby’s attempt as the character turned out to be too heroic and Spider-Man was supposed to be a teenage boy. Lee then turned to Steve Ditko who developed the now iconic look of Spider-Man.
Peter's parents suddenly appeared in his life, claiming to have been abducted by communists. He had learned to love his "parents" and even revealed to them his secret identity. They turned out to be robots invented by the Chameleon to infiltrate Peter's life, discover his connections to Spider-Man and then kill him. The robot that masqueraded as Peter's father Richard was perfectly willing to accomplish his task and kill Peter, but the Mary robot had learned to love Peter and saw him as good person. Richard turned into a vicious engine of destruction. Before Richard could finish Peter off, Mary killed him using an electric cable. In return she was killed by the Vulture who was conspiring with the Chameleon. An enraged Spider-Man completely pummeled the Vulture but was stopped by the cries of his dying "mother". She told Peter in her last moments that despite everything, she still loved him. Spider-Man vowed to track down the Chameleon and make him suffer, which he eventually did after fighting through many assassins sent by the communist. Peter ultimately spared an emotionally broken Chameleon and left him for the authorities.
One superpowered character was portrayed as an antiheroine, a rarity for its time: the Black Widow, a costumed emissary of Satan who killed evildoers in order to send them to Hell—debuted in Mystic Comics #4 (Aug. 1940), from Timely Comics, the 1940s predecessor of Marvel Comics. Most of the other female costumed crime-fighters during this era lacked superpowers. Notable characters include The Woman in Red,[18][19] introduced in Standard Comics' Thrilling Comics #2 (March 1940); Lady Luck, debuting in the Sunday-newspaper comic-book insert The Spirit Section June 2, 1940; the comedic character Red Tornado, debuting in All-American Comics #20 (Nov 1940); Miss Fury,[20] debuting in the eponymous comic strip by female cartoonist Tarpé Mills on April 6, 1941; the Phantom Lady, introduced in Quality Comics Police Comics #1 (Aug. 1941); the Black Cat,[21][22] introduced in Harvey Comics' Pocket Comics #1 (also Aug. 1941); and the Black Canary, introduced in Flash Comics #86 (Aug. 1947) as a supporting character.[23] The most iconic comic book superheroine, who debuted during the Golden Age, is Wonder Woman.[24] Modeled from the myth of the Amazons of Greek mythology, she was created by psychologist William Moulton Marston, with help and inspiration from his wife Elizabeth and their mutual lover Olive Byrne.[25][26] Wonder Woman's first appearance was in All Star Comics #8 (Dec. 1941), published by All-American Publications, one of two companies that would merge to form DC Comics in 1944.

The Iron Spider armor appears in the Ultimate Spider-Man animated series. It is initially used by Peter Parker in the episodes "Flight of the Iron Spider", "The Iron Octopus" and "Venom Bomb". Subsequent seasons depict the armor in the hands of Amadeus Cho under the Iron Spider mantle. Additionally the episode "Rampaging Rhino" features a variant Iron Spider Hulkbuster created by Curt Connors at the time when the Hulk fights with the Rhino.
Halloweiner · Horrific Head of Hare · Hound's Hood · Face Plante · Faun Feet · Sprinting Cephalopod · Terrier Trousers ·  Cadaver's Capper · Freedom Feathers · Hardium Helm · Hidden Dragon · Larval Lid · Spellbinder's Bonnet · Faux Manchu · Grub Grenades · Jupiter Jumpers · Lieutenant Bites the Dust · Shaolin Sash · Space Bracers · Bozo's Bouffant · Burny's Boney Bonnet · Corpsemopolitan · Crispy Golden Locks · Gothic Guise · Macabre Mask · Mucous Membrain · Raven's Visage · Spectralnaut · Abhorrent Appendages · Beast from Below · Carrion Companion · Cauterizer's Caudal Appendage · Creature From The Heap · Death Support Pack · External Organ · Glob · Grisly Gumbo · Handhunter · Hard-Headed Hardware · Hollowhead · Maniac's Manacles · Monster's Stompers · PY-40 Incinibot · Rugged Respirator · Scorched Skirt · Up Pyroscopes · Vicious Visage ·  Headtaker's Hood · Mann-Bird of Aberdeen · Squid's Lid · Transylvania Top · Cap'n Calamari · Horsemann's Hand-Me-Down · Lordly Lapels · Parasight · Polly Putrid ·  Ivan The Inedible · Last Bite · Monstrous Mandible · Chicken Kiev · Horned Honcho ·  Grease Monkey ·  Alternative Medicine Mann · Das Blutliebhaber · Medimedes · Shaman's Skull · Teutonkahmun · Trepanabotomizer · Archimedes the Undying · Lo-Grav Loafers · Ramses' Regalia · Second Opinion · Surgeon's Space Suit · Vicar's Vestments ·  Carious Chameleon · Hallowed Headcase · Sir Shootsalot · Candyman's Cap · Hyperbaric Bowler · Bountiful Bow · Bozo's Brogues · Foul Cowl ·  Baphomet Trotters ·  Candleer ·  Pin Pals ·  Snaggletoothed Stetson ·  Ethereal Hood · Birdie Bonnet · Dark Helm · Haunted Hat · Magical Mercenary · Manneater · One-Way Ticket · Tuque or Treat · Accursed Apparition · Beacon from Beyond · Cryptic Keepsake · Guano · Pocket Horsemann · Quoth · Sackcloth Spook · Unidentified Following Object
It seemed that Spider-man was finally back on track, with his name cleared and his life finally looking a bit better than it had in recent months. Norman Osborn however kept being a disturbing presence to Peter and Mary Jane. He started a ritual known as the Gathering of the Five, with one person getting Ultimate power, one got death, one got insanity and so on. Norman thought he gained power, but it turned out that it was insanity that he got. He attacked and kidnapped Peter. While he was captive, Peter got the shock of a life-time. His aunt May was standing in front of him, alive and well. After Spider-man broke free and defeated Norman Osborn, seemingly for good, as he was taken to a mental hospital, Peter learned that it was in fact aunt May he found. Not a clone, not a hoax. Norman had apparently kidnapped May years ago, and had an actress surgically look like aunt May and play her part while she was dying. This was why 'aunt May' knew about Peter being Spider-Man, she was hired by Norman Osborn to play her! Reed Richards of the Fantastic Four assured Peter it was his aunt. Peter saw this as a sign and stopped being Spider-Man altogether, finally living a good life with his aunt May and his wife Mary-Jane.
The Dude. His Dudeness. El Duderino if you're not into the whole brevity thing. Whatever you want to call him, well, now you can be him when you go in one of our authentic The Big Lebowski costumes for men! Officially licensed by Paramount Pictures, we have exclusive designs that you're only going to find right here at HalloweenCostumes.com. A classic men's Halloween choice, when you go in this bathrobe costume, you're sure to feel like a much laid back individual. Just make sure you know how to whip up a killer White Russian!
The Crime Master arrives and starts destroying Octavius’ work. Spider-Man drives most of Crime Master’s gang away as Octavius gets his robotic arms on The Crime Master. He slices him apart with scalpels, desperate to save his work. Spider-Man then sets on Octavius for what he has done, crushing his robotic arms. DeWolff arrives before Spider-Man kills him and tells him to thank his girlfriend for calling them in. Spider-Man sees Robbie safe and swings to see Felicia. Her guard tells him that she does not ever want to see him again after she was hurt because of him.[8]

In order to censor the Daily Bugle, Osborn kidnaps the editor J. Jonah Jameson and has the Chameleon assume his place. The Chameleon-as-Jameson goes to Urich’s apartment and shoots him, unaware that Felicia witnessed the murder. Hardy goes to the Daily Bugle offices and kills the Chameleon, leaving his body to be discovered by Spider-Man shortly before the arrival of the police.[3] Spider-Man escapes the attentions of the police and goes to his home, where he killed the Vulture, in order to stop him from murdering Aunt Parker. Despite saving his aunt, May criticized him for killing the Vulture, as he could have stopped him with his powers. She told Peter that killing people would make him less of what makes him human.[4]

That storyline came at the behest of editor-in-chief Joe Quesada, who said, "Peter being single is an intrinsic part of the very foundation of the world of Spider-Man".[73] It caused unusual public friction between Quesada and writer J. Michael Straczynski, who "told Joe that I was going to take my name off the last two issues of the [story] arc" but was talked out of doing so.[75] At issue with Straczynski's climax to the arc, Quesada said, was

Enhanced Reconnaissance Mode: This mode allows Spider-Man's hearing and optics to be enhanced. It enables both X-Ray and infrared vision to see through solid objects and locate his target. It also allows for enhanced audio reception capabilities to the point that he can eavesdrop on conversations from yards away. It also corresponds to the suit's database, allowing for data retrieval about certain individuals and their backgrounds.
Spider-Man has been featured numerous times in Hasbro's Marvel Legends series. He first appeared in the Movie Sandman Build-a-Figure wave in both his outfit from the first movie and his black costume from Spider-Man 3. He was next featured in the Arnim Zola Build-a-Figure series, this time sporting his Big Time costume. The movie version of Spider-Man from The Amazing Spider-Man 2 was then featured in the Ultimate Green Goblin Build-a-Figure wave. A classic version of Spider-Man was later featured in the Hobgoblin Build-a-Figure wave, nicknamed "Pizza Spidey" by fans due to the presence of a slice of pizza. The Ultimate version of Spider-Man was then featured in the Space Venom Build-a-Figure series. The Symbiote version of Spider-Man then appeared in the Sandman Build-a-Figure wave. A Spider-Man: Homecoming-themed wave was then launched, with Vulture's wings as the "Build-a-Vehicle" this time. The line featured the movie version of Spider-Man in his costume and his homemade suit, as well as Cosmic Spider-Man. Spider-Man has also been featured in several two-packs and box sets, including a Captain America: Civil War-themed set that included Iron Man and Captain America, and a two-pack with Ultimate Vulture.
With nearly 20 years of expertise in the costume business, more than 10,000 unique costumes, and one million-plus customizable costume and accessory options, we know Halloween inside and out. We started with a dream, and we’re in the business of making our customers’ dreams come true. Whether you’re looking for the perfect Halloween costume or you’ve been designated this Christmas’ Santa Claus, you’ve come to the right place.
Arthur Stacy: Gwen Stacy's uncle, a private investigator, first appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man (vol. 1) #93 and #95. He was reintroduced only in the 1990s, in Peter Parker: Spider-Man #70 (in the last part of 'Clone Saga'). He is George's younger brother, but was originally presented in the 1970s as the older brother. For a time, Spider-Man would call on Stacy's skills as an investigator.
During the Halloween seasonal event, which lasts from October 20th   / October 1st until November 1   / November 10th   , several enemies wear costumes that change their appearance, unique enemies spawn, and new items become available via enemy drops or via purchase. Goodie Bags also drop, offering random Halloween-themed items, mostly decorative or vanity.

Spider-Man is a fictional superhero created by writer-editor Stan Lee and writer-artist Steve Ditko. He first appeared in the anthology comic book Amazing Fantasy #15 (August 1962) in the Silver Age of Comic Books. He appears in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, as well as in a number of movies, television shows, and video game adaptations set in the Marvel Universe. In the stories, Spider-Man is the alias of Peter Parker, an orphan raised by his Aunt May and Uncle Ben in New York City after his parents Richard and Mary Parker were killed in a plane crash. Lee and Ditko had the character deal with the struggles of adolescence and financial issues, and accompanied him with many supporting characters, such as J. Jonah Jameson, Flash Thompson, Harry Osborn, romantic interests Gwen Stacy and Mary Jane Watson, and foes such as Doctor Octopus, Green Goblin and Venom. His origin story has him acquiring spider-related abilities after a bite from a radioactive spider; these include clinging to surfaces, shooting spider-webs from wrist-mounted devices, and detecting danger with his "spider-sense".
In addition to the creation of new minority heroes, publishers have filled the identities and roles of once-Caucasian heroes with new characters from minority backgrounds. The African-American John Stewart appeared in the 1970s as an alternate for Earth's Green Lantern Hal Jordan, and would become a regular member of the Green Lantern Corps from the 1980s onward. The creators of the 2000s-era Justice League animated series selected Stewart as the show's Green Lantern. In the Ultimate Marvel universe, Miles Morales, a multiracial American youth who was also bitten by a genetically-altered spider, debuted as the new Spider-Man after the apparent death of the original. Kamala Khan, a Pakistani-American teenager who is revealed to have Inhuman lineage after her shapeshifting powers manifested, takes on the identity of Ms. Marvel in 2014. Her self-titled comic book series became a cultural phenomenon, with extensive media coverage by CNN, the New York Times and The Colbert Report, and embraced by anti-Islamophobia campaigners in San Francisco who plastered over anti-Muslim bus adverts with Kamala stickers.[57] Other such successor-heroes of color include James "Rhodey" Rhodes as Iron Man, Ryan Choi as the Atom, and Jaime Reyes as Blue Beetle.
Mass-market edition of a brand new novel which follows super hero Spider-Man as he tries to put a stop to The Gentleman's (the leader of the Sinister Six) plan to destroy all the financial markets in the world. Spider-Man battles the most dangerous Sinister Six line-up ever: Doctor Octopus, Electro, Mysterio, the Vulture, the tragic but deadly Pity, and the group's mysterious leader, the Gentleman - a villain who had a hand in the deaths of Spider-Man's parents! But what neither Spider-Man nor his enemies know is that the Gentleman is about to set his master plan into motion: destroying all the financial markets in the world and make himself the richest man in the world. As for the villainess Pity, Spider-Man has become convinced that she is his long-lost sister. But to get Pity to reject her life of crime and break free of the Gentleman's control, he needs conclusive proof - proof that only the X-Man known as Wolverine has. But time is running out for Spider-Man, for Pity and for the world.
Peter Parker's romantic interests range between his first crush, the fellow high-school student Liz Allan,[47] to having his first date with Betty Brant,[88] the secretary to the Daily Bugle newspaper publisher J. Jonah Jameson. After his breakup with Betty Brant, Parker eventually falls in love with his college girlfriend Gwen Stacy,[49][52] daughter of New York City Police Department detective captain George Stacy, both of whom are later killed by supervillain enemies of Spider-Man.[57] Mary Jane Watson eventually became Peter's best friend and then his wife.[69] Felicia Hardy, the Black Cat, is a reformed cat burglar who had been Spider-Man's sole superhuman girlfriend and partner at one point.[64]
Nevertheless, variations on the term "Super Hero" are jointly claimed by DC Comics and Marvel Comics as trademarks in the United States. Registrations of "Super Hero" marks have been maintained by DC and Marvel since the 1960s,[45] including U.S. Trademark Serial Nos. 72243225 and 73222079. In 2009, the term "Super Heroes" was registered as a typography-independent "descriptive" US trademark co-owned by DC and Marvel.[46] Both DC Comics and Marvel Comics have been assiduous in protecting their rights in the "Super Hero" trademarks in jurisdictions where the registrations are in force, including the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia, and including in respect of various goods and services falling outside comic book publications.[47]
This incarnation of Spider-Man has the same powers as his classical counterpart: enhanced strength, speed, reflexes, durability and agility proportionate of a spider, along with a sixth sense which warns him of unseen danger, also known as "spider-sense" and the ability to shoot organic webbing from his wrists and adhere to sheer walls and other solid surfaces.[2] Like the traditional Spider-Man, he uses his acrobatic agility to maneuver about the rooftops and uses his webbing as nets to both stun and capture his enemies.[3] He also has a huge network of contacts throughout the city and several informants in all the gangs.[6]
The custom of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.[25] In 19th century America, Halloween was often celebrated with costume parades and "licentious revelries".[26] However, efforts were made to "domesticate" the festival to conform with Victorian era morality. Halloween was made into a private rather than public holiday, celebrations involving liquor and sensuality de-emphasized, and only children were expected to celebrate the festival.[27] Early Halloween costumes emphasized the gothic nature of Halloween, and were aimed primarily at children. Costumes were also made at home, or using items (such as make-up) which could be purchased and utilized to create a costume. But in the 1930s, A.S. Fishbach, Ben Cooper, Inc., and other firms began mass-producing Halloween costumes for sale in stores as trick-or-treating became popular in North America. Halloween costumes are often designed to imitate supernatural and scary beings. Costumes are traditionally those of monsters such as vampires, werewolves, zombies, ghosts,[28] skeletons, witches, goblins, trolls, devils, etc. or in more recent years such science fiction-inspired characters as aliens and superheroes. There are also costumes of pop culture figures like presidents, athletes, celebrities, or characters in film, television, literature, etc. Another popular trend is for women (and in some cases, men) to use Halloween as an excuse to wear sexy or revealing costumes, showing off more skin than would be socially acceptable otherwise.[29] Young girls also often dress as entirely non-scary characters at Halloween, including princesses, fairies, angels, cute animals and flowers.
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