Unlike well known rivalries in comics book depictions where heroes always still have more than one enemy but usually one archenemy (e.g., Joker, to Batman in DC Comics, Red Skull to Captain America, Doctor Doom to the Fantastic Four and the Brotherhood of Mutants to the X-Men in Marvel Comics etc.), Spider-Man is known to have three archenemies and it can be debated or disputed as to which one is worse:[123]
When Classi reaches the back door of Buca de Faggoncini to hide, a mobster kills Captain Diabetes, who is only revived by a sudden "glitch" in time initiated by the New Kid. Calling in backup, they are joined by their allies in fighting the chefs of the restaurant, soon discovering a room full of cats in cat carriers and another group of mobsters, who are only taken out by Red Wine Drunk Randy Marsh, desperately looking for his keys. As Randy is defeated, Coon and Friends manages to capture Classi.
With Leeds's help, Spider-Man tracked Toomes to an old warehouse. Parker questioned Toomes's criminal activity and what he was doing to his family, but Toomes simply waited to activate his Exo-Suit; once it did, he began attacking Spider-Man. Peter dodged every attack and quipped at Toomes, but later realized that Toomes sought to destroy the beams of the warehouse. The wings smashed through the last supporting beam of the warehouse, and debris collapsed upon Spider-Man. Vulture equipped his suit and left Spider-Man to die.

^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 36. ISBN 978-0756692360. Now it was time for [John Romita, Sr.] to introduce a new Spidey villain with the help of [Stan] Lee. Out of their pooled creative energies was born the Rhino, a monstrous behemoth trapped in a durable rhinoceros suit.

I’ve seen only brief mentions of The Phantom here - I’d have thought he was one of the earliest superheroes in comics. Checking Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Phantom - he’s described as the first costumed superhero, debuting in February 1936. So that predates some of the more well-known examples that started up a few years later (though maybe not the likes of The Shadow, but it depends on whether you think of him as a “costumed superhero” or not).
^ Another character commonly described as an archenemy is Venom. Eddie Brock as Venom is commonly described as the mirror version or the evil version of Spider-Man in many ways.[90][132][140] Venom's goals is usually depicted as trying to ruin Spider-Man's life and mess with Spider-Man's head when it comes to targeting enemies.[135] Venom is cited as being one of the most popular Spider-Man villains.[147] This popularity has led him to be an established iconic character of his own with own comic book stories.[132][148]
According to The Washington Post, “several students in Silliman said they cannot bear to live in the college anymore.” These are young people who live in safe, heated buildings with two Steinway grand pianos, an indoor basketball court, a courtyard with hammocks and picnic tables, a computer lab, a dance studio, a gym, a movie theater, a film-editing lab, billiard tables, an art gallery, and four music practice rooms. But they can’t bear this setting that millions of people would risk their lives to inhabit because one woman wrote an email that hurt their feelings?
It's possible to change the date on your device (while offline, as the date is set on consoles automatically) to between October 20th   / October 1st and November 1   / November 10th   , in order to activate the Halloween event. However if you wish to not change your device's time to avoid messing up scheduled programs you can use the external utility [RunAsDate] to launch Terraria with a changed time/date.
In the face of hateful personal attacks like that, Nicholas Christakis listened and gave restrained, civil responses. He later magnanimously tweeted, “No one, especially no students exercising right to speech, should be judged just on basis of short video clip.” (He is right.) And he invited students who still disagreed with him, and with his wife, to continue the conversation at a brunch to be hosted in their campus home.
Black Widow a.k.a. Natasha Romanova: During a HYDRA attempt to take over S.H.I.E.L.D., she is tortured to such an extent that she regresses back to an old cover identity of schoolteacher Nancy Rushman, but she is recovered by Spider-Man in time to help Nick Fury and Shang-Chi work out what had happened and restore her memory, with "Nancy" developing an attraction to Spider-Man before her memory is restored during the final fight against Madam Viper, Boomerang and the Silver Samurai.

Carlie Cooper: She is an officer of the NYPD's Crime Scene Unit and ex-best friend of Harry Osborn's ex-girlfriend, Lily Hollister. She had also been friends with Gwen Stacy. At Harry Osborn's goodbye party Peter asks her to be his girlfriend and the two share their first kiss. However they break up after Spider Island due to surmising that Peter was Spider-Man, and was angry that he'd lied to her.[4] Carlie eventually left New York for her own safety.[5]
Whoo! The Nature Boy knows a thing or two about the ladies, and he's been Whoo-ing and strutting his stuff for close to 40 years now. And his sexy swagger hasn't diminished at all over the years, like a fine wine, The Nature Boy just keeps on walking down the aisle stylin' and profilin'. With this exclusive, you can suit up just like Ric Flair for some timeless sex appeal. As Ric says, "Because all the women want to be with me, all the men want to be like me."

The first Halloween haunted house run by a nonprofit organization was produced in 1970 by the Sycamore-Deer Park Jaycees in Clifton, Ohio. It was cosponsored by WSAI, an AM radio station broadcasting out of Cincinnati, Ohio. It was last produced in 1982.[182] Other Jaycees followed suit with their own versions after the success of the Ohio house. The March of Dimes copyrighted a "Mini haunted house for the March of Dimes" in 1976 and began fundraising through their local chapters by conducting haunted houses soon after. Although they apparently quit supporting this type of event nationally sometime in the 1980s, some March of Dimes haunted houses have persisted until today.[183]


From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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