Bob mentioned the epic Ramayana, which is itself the story of a “superhero” — the god Rama, who does some pretty nifty stunts, along with his brother Lakshama and monkey hero side-kick Hanuman (my personal favorite). I think he’s probably right about Asia being the earliest origins of superheroism; Hinduism is one of the world’s oldest religions and it’s full of larger-than-life men/gods who right wrongs and fight for truth and justice.
All this is, I feel, a bit part of what feeds into making a hero a superhero in our minds - when they become larger than life, existing outside the boundaries that we normally exist in. Ironically, history in real life has probably seen more “super villains” than real super heroes; it’s much more tempting to human weakness and easier, to go outside the normal boundaries and cause harm or perform selfish acts. Many of the colorful supervillains from comic books, especially Batman’s rogue gallery of criminals, are not very far removed in some cases from the activities of real life villains who are epic in scope.
Captain Marvel a.k.a. Carol Danvers: Carol Danvers, the superhero Ms. Marvel, has worked with Spider-Man on occasion and even agreed to go on a date with him in accordance with his helping her on a mission, despite how angry he can make her. She later fulfills her promise.[3] Spider-Man had admitted to himself he finds her attractive in her outfit. At the end of the near disastrous date, the two bonded together over a love of junk food. After she was possessed by the symbiote for a time, Venom hints to Spider-Man that his feelings for Ms. Marvel are mutual. The two have remained good friends.
Jump up ^ Fieldhouse, Paul (17 April 2017). Food, Feasts, and Faith: An Encyclopedia of Food Culture in World Religions. ABC-CLIO. p. 254. ISBN 9781610694124. Archived from the original on 31 October 2017. Retrieved 13 August 2017. In Ireland, dishes based on potatoes and other vegetables were associated with Halloween, as meat was forbidden during the Catholic vigil and fast leading up to All Saint's Day.
Peter Benjamin Parker is a photographer for the Daily Bugle newspaper under Editor-in-Chief Joe Robertson. Parker is also the friendly costumed hero Spider-Man. Spider-Man possesses the abilities of Earth arachnids, allowing him to fire thread-like projectiles from his wrists. These threads may be used to spin webs of near-limitless size, as well as to capture thieves and other assorted rogues in the selfsame manner as a spider entraps traditional insects. Those who wonder about his boundless strength would be advised to listen closely, as his spectacular might is the result of radioactive energy flowing through his very veins. The aforementioned web-like materials fired from his wrists can also be used as a means of swinging to and fro, meaning that those who wish to observe the Spider-Man in action can best do so by simply looking overhead. In addition, he is known to be primarily a nocturnal adventurer, appearing in the deep of night wherever evil is afoot. His alacrity is so great, his timing so amazing, he has been compared to a flash of light. Despite his best efforts and good intentions, it seems that his attempts at justice are often overlooked, and while other heroes may find celebrity and fortune, poor Parker is constantly in one hang-up or another. Regardless, the Spider-Man soldiers on; wherever there is a fight or ruckus or tussle, the Spider-Man can be found!
^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 24. ISBN 978-0756692360. Electro charged into Spider-Man's life for the first time in another [Stan] Lee and [Steve] Ditko effort that saw Peter Parker using his brilliant mind to outwit a foe.

In Marvel Zombies 2, he notices that his hunger is starting to fade and, as a result, is the first of the Galacti to turn against his fellow zombies.[15] Eventually with the aid of Forge, Malcom, and the Acolytes, the zombies retaining their hunger are defeated. Spider-Man is one of the zombies that remain and continue work to rebuild New Wakanda, and bury the dead.[volume & issue needed]

Jump up ^ Cleene, Marcel. Compendium of Symbolic and Ritual Plants in Europe. Man & Culture, 2002. p.108. Quote: "Soul cakes were small cakes baked as food for the deceased or offered for the salvation of their souls. They were therefore offered at funerals and feasts of the dead, laid on graves, or given to the poor as representatives of the dead. The baking of these soul cakes is a universal practice".
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