^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 61. ISBN 978-0756692360. Stan [Lee] couldn't leave [the series] without gifting the readers one last new villain. With John Romita fulfilling the art chores, he crafted the Gibbon, an orphan named Martin Blank who was cursed from birth with a primitive, ape-like appearance.
Spider-Man discovered the symbiote costume during the Secret Wars and it became his primary costume until he discovered that it was an alien feeding on him. With it, he had an unlimited supply of webbing, and the suit could mimic his civilian clothing. It didn't, contrary to popular belief, enhance his powers. After meeting with Mr Fantastic, he decided it must be destroyed and would later get rid of it using the sounds of a church bell. It would later bond with Eddie Brock to form the deadly villain known as Venom. The Black Cat would later give Spidey a cloth version of the black suit which he would start wearing for a time, switching between it and the red & blue costume. After the Kraven's last Hunt story and the appearance of Venom for the first time, Mary Jane urged Peter to stop wearing the costume because it reminded her of those traumatizing events. During the Back In Black story, after Aunt May was shot by a sniper, a darkness filled Spider-Man's heart like never before. He wore the black costume to show this dark side, becoming much more ruthless towards enemies (using torture for example). Peter attempted to infiltrate Stark Tower to stop Norman Osborn, he used a black costume made of unstable molecules to disguise himself as the Venom. During the Grim Hunt story, after Kraven was recovered, he presented Peter with a black costume as a calling card after the Kravinoffs killed Peter's "brother" Kaine. He once again wore this costume and became aggressive towards the villains, vowing to hunt them all down. He was about to kill Kraven with a spear until he was convinced otherwise by Arachne and Arana. The black suit represents Spider-Man's dark side.
In order to censor the Daily Bugle, Osborn kidnaps the editor J. Jonah Jameson and has the Chameleon assume his place. The Chameleon-as-Jameson goes to Urich’s apartment and shoots him, unaware that Felicia witnessed the murder. Hardy goes to the Daily Bugle offices and kills the Chameleon, leaving his body to be discovered by Spider-Man shortly before the arrival of the police.[3] Spider-Man escapes the attentions of the police and goes to his home, where he killed the Vulture, in order to stop him from murdering Aunt Parker. Despite saving his aunt, May criticized him for killing the Vulture, as he could have stopped him with his powers. She told Peter that killing people would make him less of what makes him human.[4]
Alain Robert, nicknamed "Spider-Man", is a rock and urban climber who has scaled more than 70 tall buildings using his hands and feet, without using additional devices. He sometimes wears a Spider-Man suit during his climbs. In May 2003, he was paid approximately $18,000 to climb the 312-foot (95 m) Lloyd's building to promote the premiere of the movie Spider-Man on the British television channel Sky Movies.
To create a zombie costume, first make your clothes look old and tattered. Try using a 1:1 bleach solution to fade clothes or make them look worn out by running a grater over areas to create small tears. Make some fake blood with corn syrup, red food coloring, and chocolate syrup to spatter on your clothes so you’ll look bloody and gory! Remember to zombify your face and hair, too, using dark purplish-brown makeup around your eye socket and eyelids so your eyes look sunken in, for example.

Using a modified Octo-bot, Octavius successfully transfers his consciousnesses into Spider-Man, leaving him with Peter's memories and body and Peter Parker in Doctor Octopus's dying one. After leaving Peter for dead Otto begins to take on Spider-Man's life as his own. Peter eventually took control of the golden Octo-bot and using one of Doc Ock's own contingency plans had Scorpion, Hydro-Man and Trapster free himself from the S.H.I.E.L.D. prison The Raft. It was then that Peter tried to redo the body switch with Ock who had taken precautions to keep that from happening. Peter instead had Otto relive all of Peter's memories showing Dr. Octopus how much he had wasted his life. As a result of Peter's personality grafted to his own, Dr. Octopus decided to continue on as Spider-Man and make up for his past mistakes as the Superior Spider-man.
The time between Spider-Man capturing the burglar that killed Uncle Ben and him becoming a superhero was told over 30 years after his origin when the Amazing Fantasy series was continued in 1995 by writer Kurt Busiek (#16-18, Dec. 1995 – Mar. 1996). After catching the burglar that killed Ben, Peter had given up being Spider-Man as it reminded him of his irresponsible behavior that ultimately led to his uncle’s death. Even though Maxie Shiffman, the agent he had hired when he was a costumed wrestler, was putting out ads to track down Spider-Man, Peter didn’t want anything to do with that life. Ben had been the only earner in the family and after his death Peter and his Aunt May were struggling for money. A salesman tried to con May into buying furniture that Ben had apparently left a deposit on before his death. Although the salesman had seemed genuine at the time, Peter caught Mr. Vale pulling the same stunt on an old widower when he was swinging through the city in his Spider-Man costume to clear his head. Spider-Man followed Mr. Vale to a warehouse where he discovered a whole gang of organized criminals led by The Undertaker. Spider-Man challenged the gang and soon had them rounded up for the police. Chronologically this was the first time Spider-Man had been threatened with a gun. More significantly, during the fight he discovered his Spider-Sense for the first time. Capturing these criminals lead Peter to believe that this is how he has to make up for Uncle Ben’s death, by using his powers to help others.

Jump up ^ Cleene, Marcel. Compendium of Symbolic and Ritual Plants in Europe. Man & Culture, 2002. p.108. Quote: "Soul cakes were small cakes baked as food for the deceased or offered for the salvation of their souls. They were therefore offered at funerals and feasts of the dead, laid on graves, or given to the poor as representatives of the dead. The baking of these soul cakes is a universal practice".
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