The first Halloween haunted house run by a nonprofit organization was produced in 1970 by the Sycamore-Deer Park Jaycees in Clifton, Ohio. It was cosponsored by WSAI, an AM radio station broadcasting out of Cincinnati, Ohio. It was last produced in 1982.[182] Other Jaycees followed suit with their own versions after the success of the Ohio house. The March of Dimes copyrighted a "Mini haunted house for the March of Dimes" in 1976 and began fundraising through their local chapters by conducting haunted houses soon after. Although they apparently quit supporting this type of event nationally sometime in the 1980s, some March of Dimes haunted houses have persisted until today.[183]
^ Another character commonly described as an archenemy is Venom. Eddie Brock as Venom is commonly described as the mirror version or the evil version of Spider-Man in many ways.[90][132][140] Venom's goals is usually depicted as trying to ruin Spider-Man's life and mess with Spider-Man's head when it comes to targeting enemies.[135] Venom is cited as being one of the most popular Spider-Man villains.[147] This popularity has led him to be an established iconic character of his own with own comic book stories.[132][148]

Whitney Chang (appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man and The Amazing Spider-Man 2, voiced by Claudia Black (ASM 1) and Sumalee Montano (ASM 2)): She is a top investigative reporter for the Channel 3 News Network and is well known for putting herself at risk for finding out the truth. She met Spider-Man in person while she was investigating a secret Oscorp facility involving cross-species genetics and its connection with Alistair Smythe, with Spider-Man tracking down a crate with Dr. Connor's research to create the cure. Whitney gave Spider-Man her camera and asks him to take photos exposing Oscorp's research. As explained in her bio, Chang grew up in the Sunset Park region of Brooklyn, New York, where she witnessed a neighbor being murdered by an angry mob after being framed for murder and being slandered by the news for days. After graduating from Yale, she quits her job as the host of a music video channel and snuck aboard a flight to Iraq, arriving just as American troops invade Baghdad. In The Amazing Spider-Man 2, through unspecified circumstances, Whitney leaves her job at the Channel 9 News Network and now works at the Daily Bugle. She works with Daily Bugle newcomer Peter Parker to expose Wilson Fisk as the Kingpin. Her role in Amazing Spider-Man 2 is lessened compared to its predecessor.


The Marvel Comics teams of the early 1960s typically included at least one (and often the only) female member, much like DC's flagship superhero team the Justice League of America (whose initial roster included Wonder Woman as the token female); examples include the Fantastic Four's Invisible Girl, the X-Men's Jean Grey (originally known as Marvel Girl), the Avengers' Wasp, and the Brotherhood of Mutants' Scarlet Witch (who later joined the Avengers).


I agree with some of the earlier posts. I would say that Greek legends (and even earlier) would be the first superheros. As for the comment about Superhero’s being believable. Current Superhero’s mmight not be believed in by their writers, but young children stilll believe in Superhero’s. The writers just stopped believing what they were talking about.
Spider-Man Noir appears in Ultimate Spider-Man, voiced by Milo Ventimiglia. In the episode "The Spider-Verse: Part 2", after Green Goblin appears on the Noir reality to collect the DNA of that universe Spider-Man, he is confronted by both the "Noir" and the "Ultimate" Spider-Man, who had followed the Goblin to this universe. However, after rejecting an alliance proposed by his counterpart, Noir is forced to work together with him after the Green Goblin hijacks an airship to draw out Spider-Man Noir, taking a group of civilians present hostage, including Mary Jane. While the Ultimate Spider-Man is saving the hostages, Spider-Man Noir fights the Goblin on his own, but the Goblin manage to take the DNA of a distracted Spider-Man Noir and then departs. Spider-Man Noir admits to both Ultimate Spider-Man and Mary Jane that he should drop the "lone wolf" act, and as his counterpart follows the Goblin to another dimension, the two Spider-Men depart as friends. Spider-Man Noir later returns In "The Spider-Verse: Part 4", summoned by "Ultimate" Spider-Man along with other Spider-Man counterparts to form a team known as the Web-Warriors in order to combat the Green Goblin and Electro. After the villains are defeated, the Web-Warriors return to their respective dimensions. Spider-Man Noir makes a cameo in the fourth season episode "Miles from Home".
The modern imagery of Halloween comes from many sources, including Christian eschatology, national customs, works of Gothic and horror literature (such as the novels Frankenstein and Dracula) and classic horror films (such as Frankenstein and The Mummy).[128][129] Imagery of the skull, a reference to Golgotha in the Christian tradition, serves as "a reminder of death and the transitory quality of human life" and is consequently found in memento mori and vanitas compositions;[130] skulls have therefore been commonplace in Halloween, which touches on this theme.[131] Traditionally, the back walls of churches are "decorated with a depiction of the Last Judgment, complete with graves opening and the dead rising, with a heaven filled with angels and a hell filled with devils", a motif that has permeated the observance of this triduum.[132] One of the earliest works on the subject of Halloween is from Scottish poet John Mayne, who, in 1780, made note of pranks at Halloween; "What fearfu' pranks ensue!", as well as the supernatural associated with the night, "Bogies" (ghosts), influencing Robert Burns' "Halloween" (1785).[133] Elements of the autumn season, such as pumpkins, corn husks, and scarecrows, are also prevalent. Homes are often decorated with these types of symbols around Halloween. Halloween imagery includes themes of death, evil, and mythical monsters.[134] Black, orange, and sometimes purple are Halloween's traditional colors.
Spider-Man is zombified by Captain America. Unlike many of his zombie compatriots, Spider-Man is consumed with guilt over his need to eat flesh, though he is unable to prevent himself from satiating his hunger. He later eats Galactus, and becomes one of The Galactus, a number of heroes who obtain Galactus' powers due to consuming him. When his hunger begins to fade he turns on his fellow zombies, and later travels to Earth Z, where he kills the Sinister Six. He makes attempts to find a cure and succeeds, filling Sandman with nanobites and using him to wipe out all zombies, including himself.
^ Jump up to: a b c Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 59. ISBN 978-0756692360. In the first issue of The Amazing Spider-Man to be written by someone other than Stan Lee...Thomas also managed to introduce a major new player to Spidey's life - the scientifically created vampire known as Morbius.

Several of the traditional activities from Ireland and Britain involve foretelling one's future partner or spouse. An apple would be peeled in one long strip, then the peel tossed over the shoulder. The peel is believed to land in the shape of the first letter of the future spouse's name.[167][168] Two hazelnuts would be roasted near a fire; one named for the person roasting them and the other for the person they desire. If the nuts jump away from the heat, it is a bad sign, but if the nuts roast quietly it foretells a good match.[169][170] A salty oatmeal bannock would be baked; the person would eat it in three bites and then go to bed in silence without anything to drink. This is said to result in a dream in which their future spouse offers them a drink to quench their thirst.[171] Unmarried women were told that if they sat in a darkened room and gazed into a mirror on Halloween night, the face of their future husband would appear in the mirror.[172] However, if they were destined to die before marriage, a skull would appear. The custom was widespread enough to be commemorated on greeting cards[173] from the late 19th century and early 20th century.
Parades and processions provide opportunities for people to dress up in historical or imaginative costumes. For example, in 1879 the artist Hans Makart designed costumes and scenery to celebrate the wedding anniversary of the Austro-Hungarian Emperor and Empress and led the people of Vienna in a costume parade that became a regular event until the mid-twentieth century. Uncle Sam costumes are worn on Independence Day in the United States. The Lion Dance, which is part of Chinese New Year celebrations, is performed in costume. Some costumes, such as the ones used in the Dragon Dance, need teams of people to create the required effect.

In this light, the difference between modern superheros and older heros (Jesus, Gilgamesh, Hercules, Arthur) is that the older heroes operated in a religious milieu; their powers were derived from their connection with the divine. Superheroes are secular characters, whose powers (more often than not, anyway) derive from the realm of science and technology. Granted, there are some magical superheroes — Wonder Woman, for instance, or Captain Marvel — but even then it is often their ability to manipulate the world of science and technology (e.g. WW’s invisible plane) that sets them apart.
Popular choices for boys costumes include classic horror icons such as vampires and zombies. Maybe your son loves video games and wants to portray Freddy Fazbear or the Super Mario Bros.! Some hilarious options can turn them into food, drinks, and animals. Whatever and whoever they wish to become, there are so many great options for boy’s Halloween costumes. Look through all of our costumes to find the perfect outfit for Halloween nights, celebrations and parties!
Bzz! Bzz! Bzz! That's that sound of justice when served by Mosquito. When the insect-human hybrid Mosquito enters the fray, enemies are quickly drained of their will to fight… and blood. Bitten by a radioactive mosquito, Clyde Donovan became the superhuman disease vector known as: Mosquito. Now he sucks the blood out of crime and is generally really gross.
Halloween costumes are costumes worn on or around Halloween, a festival which falls on October 31. An early reference to wearing costumes at Halloween comes from Scotland in 1585, but they may pre-date this. There are many references to the custom during the 18th and 19th centuries in the Celtic countries of Scotland, Ireland, Mann and Wales. It has been suggested that the custom comes from the Celtic festivals of Samhain and Calan Gaeaf, or from the practise of "souling" during the Christian observance of Allhallowtide. Wearing costumes and mumming has long been associated with festivals at other times of the year, such as on Christmas.[1] Halloween costumes are traditionally based on frightening supernatural or folkloric beings. However, by the 1930s costumes based on characters in mass media such as film, literature, and radio were popular. Halloween costumes have tended to be worn mainly by young people, but since the mid-20th century they have been increasingly worn by adults also.
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