The following activities were a common feature of Halloween in Ireland and Britain during the 17th–20th centuries. Some have become more widespread and continue to be popular today. One common game is apple bobbing or dunking (which may be called "dooking" in Scotland)[165] in which apples float in a tub or a large basin of water and the participants must use only their teeth to remove an apple from the basin. A variant of dunking involves kneeling on a chair, holding a fork between the teeth and trying to drive the fork into an apple. Another common game involves hanging up treacle or syrup-coated scones by strings; these must be eaten without using hands while they remain attached to the string, an activity that inevitably leads to a sticky face. Another once-popular game involves hanging a small wooden rod from the ceiling at head height, with a lit candle on one end and an apple hanging from the other. The rod is spun round and everyone takes turns to try to catch the apple with their teeth.[166]
It was during the 1930s, about the same time as trick-or-treating, that Halloween-themed haunted houses first began to appear in America. It was in the late 1950s that haunted houses as a major attraction began to appear, focusing first on California. Sponsored by the Children's Health Home Junior Auxiliary, the San Mateo Haunted House opened in 1957. The San Bernardino Assistance League Haunted House opened in 1958. Home haunts began appearing across the country during 1962 and 1963. In 1964, the San Manteo Haunted House opened, as well as the Children's Museum Haunted House in Indianapolis.[178]
This suit is based upon a reality in which Peter Parker's uncle Ben did not die, and eventually learned how to bring other Spider-Men into his universe to absorb their powers. After trying to absorb Spider-Man from Earth-616 (our universe), things backfired and this version of Peter Parker was put into a coma, while his spirit was trapped in Hell. It wasn't until later that his spirit was freed, giving him a second chance at life as the Ghost Spider - bearing the flaming skull head
Following Davis's lead, Spider-Man sneaked into the ferry and went looking for the Vulture. During his scouting, Stark called him, but Spider-Man hung up on him to focus on his targets. Spider-Man interrupted the deal and defeated Vulture's gang and Mac Gargan, but the FBI interrupted Spider-Man's ambush and proceeded to arrest everyone at the scene.
Arthur Stacy: Gwen Stacy's uncle, a private investigator, first appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man (vol. 1) #93 and #95. He was reintroduced only in the 1990s, in Peter Parker: Spider-Man #70 (in the last part of 'Clone Saga'). He is George's younger brother, but was originally presented in the 1970s as the older brother. For a time, Spider-Man would call on Stacy's skills as an investigator.
Following the 2015 Secret Wars event, a number of Spider-Man-related titles were either relaunched or created as part of the "All-New, All-Different Marvel" event. Among them, The Amazing Spider-Man was relaunched as well and primarily focuses on Peter Parker continuing to run Parker Industries, and becoming a successful businessman who is operating worldwide.[43]

During Grim Hunt, Peter is already weakened and exhausted from his "gauntlet". After a loud knocking at his apartment door and he opens it only to see his estranged clone Kaine, beaten and bloodied. Before passing out, Kaine reveals to Peter that the "Spiders" are being hunted. A loud explosion is heard nearby his apartment and Peter goes to check it out only to see Arachne fighting off Ana and Alyosha Kravinoff. Peter, being weakened by the swine flu, struggles to put up a fight and manages to impale Alyosha on a broken pipe, gaining him time to retrieve Arachne and to escape. After retreating to Mattie Franklin's apartment, they are approached by a dead Ezekiel. He then tells Spider-Man and Arachne that they have to save Arana from the clutches of the Kravinoff's. As they finally reach her, they become outnumbered and defeated and Arachne and Arana are captured. Kaine eventually arrives to help out but was too late to make a difference. He tries to warn Peter from following Ezekiel but Peter lashes out in anger and the two set off to find Kraven's base.
The updated suit has many new features, such as Karen, an artificially intelligent system to aid him, a heads-up display embedded in the eye lenses, a reconnaissance drone, a parachute, and retractable wingsuit components. The suit was monitored by the Stark Industry Training Wheels Protocol, a program designed and installed into the suit by Stark to restrict certain actions, and the Baby Monitor Protocol, which tracked and recorded everything through the eye lenses.
In 2010, a stage musical entitled Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark opened on Broadway, with music by Bono and the edge and writing by Julie Taymor. The musical was wrought with problems from the very beginning, with multiple injuries happening to actors on the set, and a total cost of 75 million dollars for the production. After opening for previews, the show received many terrible reviews, and was temporarily shut down for rewrites.

Since the North American history is relatively short, in searching for the superhero, maybe you should take a look into European or Asian history. I’m pretty sure there were stories about the super-capable guys fighting for the justice long before the 1934. These stories were probably told by the word of mouth, more likely then written down or sketched.


Spider-Man has changed his costume many times but would always return to his classic and most well known look which has varied sometimes. He has had many memorable costumes, including the Black & White symbiote suite, the Red & Gold Iron Spider suit, the Identity Crisis costumes, the Scarlet Spider costume, the White & Blue Armored Spider suit, the Bag-Man costume and recently he has started wearing a black & green costume. You can view several of Spider-Man's costumes in his costume gallery.
By most definitions, characters do not require actual superhuman powers or phenomena to be deemed superheroes.[1][2][3] While the Dictionary.com definition of "superhero" is "a figure, especially in a comic strip or cartoon, endowed with superhuman powers and usually portrayed as fighting evil or crime",[4] the longstanding Merriam-Webster dictionary gives the definition as "a fictional hero having extraordinary or superhuman powers; also: an exceptionally skillful or successful person".[5] Terms such as masked crime fighters, costumed adventurers or masked vigilantes are sometimes used to refer to characters such as the Spirit, who may not be explicitly referred to as superheroes but nevertheless share similar traits.
Batman's utility belt is his most characteristic prop next to the Batarang, much like Wonder Woman's Lasso of Truth, or Green Lantern's power ring. The exact contents of this belt are not known because Batman usually changes it to suit his needs. His uncanny ability to carry unusually appropriate tools is legendary. Batman's enemies are especially interested in the utility belt as they believe it will give them an advantage over him, but the belt's pockets are locked and only Batman knows how to open them. Occasionally, the utility belt is depicted as having defense mechanisms such as electric shock or stun gas in order to prevent tampering.

Jump up ^ Skelly, Tim. "Interview II: 'I created an army of characters, and now my connection to them is lost.'" (Initially broadcast over WNUR-FM on "The Great Electric Bird", May 14, 1971. Transcribed and published in The Nostalgia Journal #27.) Reprinted in The Comics Journal Library Volume One: Jack Kirby, George, Milo ed. May 2002, Fantagraphics Books. p. 16
Spider-Man also fought the Rhino, Shocker, and the Scorpion. At one point, Peter felt that he was unable to carry the burden of being Spider-Man any longer and considered retiring from super-heroics. When the Kingpin of Crime made his move to take over the city, Peter knew that it was still his responsibility to protect the innocent and so he defeated this crime-lord and returned to crime fighting.
In this new series Spider-Man is voiced by Drake Bell (who played a spoof of the character in the parody film "Superhero Movie"). At the start of the show, Peter is recruited by Nick Fury to join the SHIELD organization in order to learn how to become a better hero. The series highlights the more technological side of the character, and showcases various gadgets and vehicles such as the Iron Spider suit. He leads a team of teenage heroes consisting of Nova, White Tiger, Power Man and Iron Fist, while other characters like Amadeus Cho, Agent Venom and Ka-Zar appear as the series progressies. Alternate versions of Spider-Man like Miles Morales, Spider-Ham, and Spider-Man 2099 all made their animated debuts in the third season.

When Spider-Man first appeared in the early 1960s, teenagers in superhero comic books were usually relegated to the role of sidekick to the protagonist. The Spider-Man series broke ground by featuring Peter Parker, a high school student from Queens behind Spider-Man's secret identity and with whose "self-obsessions with rejection, inadequacy, and loneliness" young readers could relate.[9] While Spider-Man had all the makings of a sidekick, unlike previous teen heroes such as Bucky and Robin, Spider-Man had no superhero mentor like Captain America and Batman; he thus had to learn for himself that "with great power there must also come great responsibility"—a line included in a text box in the final panel of the first Spider-Man story but later retroactively attributed to his guardian, the late Uncle Ben.
After suffering numerous defeats at the hands of Spider-Man, the Green Goblin vowed to destroy his foe once and for all. Using a special gas that blocks Peter's Spider-Sense, the Goblin followed Peter around and discovered his secret identity. Now knowing Peter was Spider-Man, the Green Goblin kidnapped him, and although he has the chance to kill Peter, the Goblin instead revealed his own secret identity. He was Norman Osborn, a ruthless businessman who was also Harry's father. Norman released Spider-Man from his restraints to defeat him in combat and prove his superiority. The Web-Slinger managed to defeat him and knocked him into some chemicals, resulting in Norman having amnesia and no recollection of both his and Peter's alternate egos.
Black Widow of the Avengers knows a thing or two about kicking butt and taking names, and it doesn’t matter if she’s teaming up with the Cap, Hawkeye, or just striking out solo. When she’s ready to throw down, it’s time to put all villains on notice. Recreate her Captain America: Civil War look with this stunning movie costume ; all you’ll need to complete the style is a wig for her signature long red hair.
In the ongoing series Ultimate Comics: Avengers, a second Spider-Man was shown to be one of its members, and is simply referred to as the Spider. His costume bears an orange-and-purple color as opposed to red-and-blue. The Spider once claimed that he was a clone made from the DNA of Spider-Man and Professor X that was sent from the future. In the "Death of Spider-Man" story arc "Avengers vs. New Ultimates", he is revealed to be North Asian and acting under the orders of Gregory Stark. He led a superhuman uprising in North Korea.[43] During the events of said uprising, The Spider was killed by Hawkeye after the Avengers and the New Ultimates intervened.[volume & issue needed]
Many new openly gay, lesbian and bisexual characters have since emerged in superhero fiction, such as Gen¹³'s Rainmaker, Apollo and Midnighter of The Authority, and Wiccan and Hulkling of the Young Avengers. Notable transgender or gender bending characters are fewer in number by comparison: the alter ego of superheroine Zsazsa Zaturnnah, a seminal character in Philippine popular culture,[63] is an effeminate gay man who transforms into a female superhuman after ingesting a magical stone. Desire from Neil Gaiman's The Sandman series and Xavin from the Runaways are both characters who could (and often) change their gender at will. Alysia Yeoh, a supporting character created by writer Gail Simone for the Batgirl ongoing series published by DC Comics, received substantial media attention in 2011 for being the first major transgender character written in a contemporary context in a mainstream American comic book.[64]
One custom that persists in modern-day Ireland is the baking (or more often nowadays, the purchase) of a barmbrack (Irish: báirín breac), which is a light fruitcake, into which a plain ring, a coin, and other charms are placed before baking. It is said that those who get a ring will find their true love in the ensuing year. This is similar to the tradition of king cake at the festival of Epiphany.
The letters page for US Marvel Comics issue #64 declared The Transformers and Marvel Universes to be separate. In the process, it politely asked the readers to just forget about the issue guest-starring Spider-Man. But the Wiki never forgets. The Marvel Database wiki notes that the Spider-Man from the issue therefore appears to be a paradox, as he has memories of events of the mainstream "616" universe, but lives in a realm where few 616 heroes and villains exist.
Digitale transformatie is een vaak voorkomend en veelomvattend begrip. Gelukkig weten wij hier wel raad mee. In een interview met CustomerFirst vertellen onze collega’s, Yvonne de Keijzer en Femke Oosterlinck, wat digitale transformatie voor ons in de praktijk betekent. Co-creatie en de combinatie mensen en technologie zijn bepalend om de ultieme klantrelatie- en beleving te...
In 1994 Captain Universe appeared in a one-shot, coinciding with a promotion, with the claim that readers could have a comic about themselves made for a fee. The comics were generally stock stories, with minor details (such as skin or hair color, key names or phrases, etc.) altered based on information provided by the purchaser. Veterinary student Jeff Christiansen, who would later become the force behind the resurgence of the Official Handbooks of the Marvel Universe in the mid-2000s was made the official Captain Universe of the comic so that it could be considered an in-continuity comic. The one-shot was titled X-Men/Captain Universe: Sleeping Giants.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 72. ISBN 978-0756692360. Writer Gerry Conway and artist Ross Andru introduced two major new characters to Spider-Man's world and the Marvel Universe in this self-contained issue. Not only would the vigilante known as the Punisher go on to be one of the most important and iconic Marvel creations of the 1970s, but his instigator, the Jackal, would become the next big threat in Spider-Man's life.

The Sailor Moon series is known for featuring a substantial number of openly LGBT characters since its inception, as Japan have traditionally been more open about portraying homosexuality in its children's media compared to many countries in the West.[65][66] Certain characters who are presented as homosexual or transgender in one continuity may not be presented as such in others, particularly with dubbed versions made for international release.[67]
Spider-Man managed to track his friends to the Washington Monument and reached the place just as the Chitauri Energy Core exploded inside Ned Leeds backpack. Karen informed him that his friends were trapped inside the Monument elevator, which was in danger of plummeting, and Spider-Man scaled the monument as quickly as he could, locating the most optimal entry point of the monument with his suit.
Unseen scientist Mister Fantastic constructed large, transforming battle armour for various superhumans; Spider-Man received two, one based on each of his costumes, both of which could transform into a high-speed motorcycle. It is likely Richards gained the idea from Spider-Man, as it is inconceivable the encounter with the Transformers wouldn't have a lasting impact on the vigilante.[1]
Writers and artists over the years have established a rogues gallery of supervillains to face Spider-Man. In comics and in other media. As with the hero, the majority of the villains' powers originate with scientific accidents or the misuse of scientific technology, and many have animal-themed costumes or powers.[note 6] Examples are listed down below in the ordering of their original chronological appearance:      Indicates a group.
‘We hebben inmiddels vijf jaar op rij het topniveau behaald in de Champions League van de internationale klantenservices’, kon Cindy Kroon (vice president Customers & Solutions regio NL/UK bij Nuon/Vattenfall) een tijdje terug wel van de daken schreeuwen na het binnenslepen van het COPC CX 6.0-certificaat. ‘En toch blijft dit voor ons iets heel bijzonders.’ Achterover leunen is er dan ook niet bij voor de energiespeler: samen met Bernard Steenbergen (director Customer Service Operations) daagt Kroon de organisatie continu uit dit niveau vast te houden. Minimaal.
Lesley Bannatyne and Cindy Ott both write that Anglican colonists in the Southern United States and Catholic colonists in Maryland "recognized All Hallow's Eve in their church calendars",[114][115] although the Puritans of New England maintained strong opposition to the holiday, along with other traditional celebrations of the established Church, including Christmas.[116] Almanacs of the late 18th and early 19th century give no indication that Halloween was widely celebrated in North America.[117] It was not until mass Irish and Scottish immigration in the 19th century that Halloween became a major holiday in North America.[117] Confined to the immigrant communities during the mid-19th century, it was gradually assimilated into mainstream society and by the first decade of the 20th century it was being celebrated coast to coast by people of all social, racial and religious backgrounds.[118] "In Cajun areas, a nocturnal Mass was said in cemeteries on Halloween night. Candles that had been blessed were placed on graves, and families sometimes spent the entire night at the graveside".[119]
×