The Batsuit is the costume Batman wears to conceal his identity and to frighten criminals. Unable to create it by himself, Bruce Wayne needed Lucius Fox to provide him some sort of armor. Fox presented him a prototype armor suit that was rejected by the army due to cost. After receiving the suit, Bruce sprays it with black rubber and adds a bat symbol.
In addition to the creation of new minority heroes, publishers have filled the identities and roles of once-Caucasian heroes with new characters from minority backgrounds. The African-American John Stewart appeared in the 1970s as an alternate for Earth's Green Lantern Hal Jordan, and would become a regular member of the Green Lantern Corps from the 1980s onward. The creators of the 2000s-era Justice League animated series selected Stewart as the show's Green Lantern. In the Ultimate Marvel universe, Miles Morales, a multiracial American youth who was also bitten by a genetically-altered spider, debuted as the new Spider-Man after the apparent death of the original. Kamala Khan, a Pakistani-American teenager who is revealed to have Inhuman lineage after her shapeshifting powers manifested, takes on the identity of Ms. Marvel in 2014. Her self-titled comic book series became a cultural phenomenon, with extensive media coverage by CNN, the New York Times and The Colbert Report, and embraced by anti-Islamophobia campaigners in San Francisco who plastered over anti-Muslim bus adverts with Kamala stickers.[57] Other such successor-heroes of color include James "Rhodey" Rhodes as Iron Man, Ryan Choi as the Atom, and Jaime Reyes as Blue Beetle.

Some Christians feel concerned about the modern celebration of Halloween because they feel it trivializes – or celebrates – paganism, the occult, or other practices and cultural phenomena deemed incompatible with their beliefs.[217] Father Gabriele Amorth, an exorcist in Rome, has said, "if English and American children like to dress up as witches and devils on one night of the year that is not a problem. If it is just a game, there is no harm in that."[218] In more recent years, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Boston has organized a "Saint Fest" on Halloween.[219] Similarly, many contemporary Protestant churches view Halloween as a fun event for children, holding events in their churches where children and their parents can dress up, play games, and get candy for free. To these Christians, Halloween holds no threat to the spiritual lives of children: being taught about death and mortality, and the ways of the Celtic ancestors actually being a valuable life lesson and a part of many of their parishioners' heritage.[220] Christian minister Sam Portaro wrote that Halloween is about using "humor and ridicule to confront the power of death".[221]
In a controversial storyline, Peter becomes convinced that Ben Reilly, the Scarlet Spider (a clone of Peter created by his college professor Miles Warren) is the real Peter Parker, and that he, Peter, is the clone. Peter gives up the Spider-Man identity to Reilly for a time, until Reilly is killed by the returning Green Goblin and revealed to be the clone after all.[71] In stories published in 2005 and 2006 (such as "The Other"), he develops additional spider-like abilities including biological web-shooters, toxic stingers that extend from his forearms, the ability to stick individuals to his back, enhanced Spider-sense and night vision, and increased strength and speed. Peter later becomes a member of the New Avengers, and reveals his civilian identity to the world,[72] increasing his already numerous problems. His marriage to Mary Jane and public unmasking are later erased in another controversial[73] storyline "One More Day", in a Faustian bargain with the demon Mephisto that results in several other adjustments to the timeline, including the resurrection of Harry Osborn and the return of Spider-Man's traditional tools and powers.[74]
Jump up ^ Portaro, Sam (25 January 1998). A Companion to the Lesser Feasts and Fasts. Cowley Publications. p. 199. ISBN 1461660513. All Saints' Day is the centerpiece of an autumn triduum. In the carnival celebrations of All Hallows' Eve our ancestors used the most powerful weapon in the human arsenal, the power of humor and ridicule to confront the power of death. The following day, in the commemoration of All Saints, we gave witness to the victory of incarnate goodness embodied in remarkable deeds and doers triumphing over the misanthropy of darkness and devils. And in the commemoration of All Souls we proclaimed the hope of common mortality expressed in our aspirations and expectations of a shared eternity.

Halloween is a wonderful time to tickle everyone’s funny bones with a boys humor costume! If you’re son is the type who’s always cracking jokes and is the life of the party, he’ll want to put his sense of humor on full display. He can dress up as a pizza slice, a man-eating shark or even a whoopee cushion, all guaranteed to make people stop in their tracks and give in to the giggles.

Whitney Chang (appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man and The Amazing Spider-Man 2, voiced by Claudia Black (ASM 1) and Sumalee Montano (ASM 2)): She is a top investigative reporter for the Channel 3 News Network and is well known for putting herself at risk for finding out the truth. She met Spider-Man in person while she was investigating a secret Oscorp facility involving cross-species genetics and its connection with Alistair Smythe, with Spider-Man tracking down a crate with Dr. Connor's research to create the cure. Whitney gave Spider-Man her camera and asks him to take photos exposing Oscorp's research. As explained in her bio, Chang grew up in the Sunset Park region of Brooklyn, New York, where she witnessed a neighbor being murdered by an angry mob after being framed for murder and being slandered by the news for days. After graduating from Yale, she quits her job as the host of a music video channel and snuck aboard a flight to Iraq, arriving just as American troops invade Baghdad. In The Amazing Spider-Man 2, through unspecified circumstances, Whitney leaves her job at the Channel 9 News Network and now works at the Daily Bugle. She works with Daily Bugle newcomer Peter Parker to expose Wilson Fisk as the Kingpin. Her role in Amazing Spider-Man 2 is lessened compared to its predecessor.


A few days after amazing crowds numerous times, Peter was walking home when he saw a police car in front of his house. Wondering what was going on he asked the policeman what happened. He was shocked when he was told that his Uncle Ben was murdered by a burglar attempting to steal from the Parkers. Ben was shot after attempting to stop him, dying almost instantly. Furious, Peter donned his costume and set out for vengeance. Tracking the murderer to an abandoned warehouse, Spidey confronted the criminal, knocking out the man with one punch. When he looked at the fugitive's face he realized this burglar was the guy the security guard was chasing at the TV set! With his uncle paying the ultimate price for his inaction and indifference, he found out with great power comes great responsibility. From then on, Peter decided to use his newfound powers not for personal gain, but to fight crime and protect the innocent.

Some superheroes use their powers to counter daily crime while also combating threats against humanity from supervillains, who are their criminal counterparts. Often at least one of these supervillains will be the superhero's archenemy. Some long-running superheroes and superheroines such as Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, Hulk, Green Lantern, the Flash, Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, Iron Man and the X-Men have a rogues gallery of many villains. There are movies and TV shows featuring various super heroes.

Reed and Horizon finally develop a cure to the virus, based off of Anti-Venom's symbiotic abilities, able to kill the virus and reverse the mutation, turning the spiders into normal people again. However, the Spider-Queen sends Tarantula to poison the serum; Peter fights him off, and Reed and Horizon manage to give Peter back his spider sense. Peter, with his full power, defeats Tarantula and throws him into a pool of the serum. The serum cures Tarantula of his degeneration and even the Spider-Queen's mind control; the healthy Kaine offers to help Peter. Madame Web and Spider-Queen are both reconnected to the Web. Spider-Queen thus becomes a Spider-Goddess.
The heart of the Night of Light is an all-night vigil of prayer, but there is room for children's fun too: sweets, perhaps a bonfire and dressing up as St George or St Lucy. The minimum gesture is to put a lighted candle in the window, which is in itself too exciting for some proponents of health and safety. The inventor of the Night of Light is Damian Stayne, the founder of a year-round religious community called Cor et Lumen Christi – heart and light of Christ. This new movement is Catholic, orthodox and charismatic – emphasising the work of the Holy Spirit.
When Spider-Man first appeared in the early 1960s, teenagers in superhero comic books were usually relegated to the role of sidekick to the protagonist. The Spider-Man series broke ground by featuring Peter Parker, a high school student from Queens behind Spider-Man's secret identity and with whose "self-obsessions with rejection, inadequacy, and loneliness" young readers could relate.[9] While Spider-Man had all the makings of a sidekick, unlike previous teen heroes such as Bucky and Robin, Spider-Man had no superhero mentor like Captain America and Batman; he thus had to learn for himself that "with great power there must also come great responsibility"—a line included in a text box in the final panel of the first Spider-Man story but later retroactively attributed to his guardian, the late Uncle Ben.
Pursuing the Vulture once again, Peter Parker went to grab his homemade suit from beneath the school lockers. After changing hastily into his suit, Spider-Man went outside only to be ambushed by the Shocker, who subsequently knocked Spider-Man's Web-Shooters off his wrists, putting him at a disadvantage. Shocker relentlessly kept attacking Spider-Man, smashing him through school buses. Before Shocker could strike Spider-Man again, Ned used one of the Web-Shooters to distract the Shocker, and Spider-Man bound him to a school bus.[2]
Rwarrrrr! You might not have the wookiee growl down pat, but you'll instantly be ready to co-pilot the Millennium Falcon when you slip on this hoodie. Probably the easiest of all ways to rock a Star Wars costume, it features luxurious wookiee faux fur and an embroidered bandoleer. And that extra fur is sure to keep you toasty if you live in a colder climate, like Hoth.
During Grim Hunt, Peter is already weakened and exhausted from his "gauntlet". After a loud knocking at his apartment door and he opens it only to see his estranged clone Kaine, beaten and bloodied. Before passing out, Kaine reveals to Peter that the "Spiders" are being hunted. A loud explosion is heard nearby his apartment and Peter goes to check it out only to see Arachne fighting off Ana and Alyosha Kravinoff. Peter, being weakened by the swine flu, struggles to put up a fight and manages to impale Alyosha on a broken pipe, gaining him time to retrieve Arachne and to escape. After retreating to Mattie Franklin's apartment, they are approached by a dead Ezekiel. He then tells Spider-Man and Arachne that they have to save Arana from the clutches of the Kravinoff's. As they finally reach her, they become outnumbered and defeated and Arachne and Arana are captured. Kaine eventually arrives to help out but was too late to make a difference. He tries to warn Peter from following Ezekiel but Peter lashes out in anger and the two set off to find Kraven's base.
In addition, because some meta-human criminals have the power to see through solid objects, Batman lines the cowl with lead to protect his identity. One of the cowl's ears carries a high-gain antenna for an internal comm-link on the left side of the cowl, allowing Batman to stay in contact with his allies. The comm-link can also scan police radios and other communication frequencies. It also carries an inertial navigation unit to keep him in balance when facing foes such as the Scarecrow or Count Vertigo.
Halloween costumes are costumes worn on or around Halloween, a festival which falls on October 31. An early reference to wearing costumes at Halloween comes from Scotland in 1585, but they may pre-date this. There are many references to the custom during the 18th and 19th centuries in the Celtic countries of Scotland, Ireland, Mann and Wales. It has been suggested that the custom comes from the Celtic festivals of Samhain and Calan Gaeaf, or from the practise of "souling" during the Christian observance of Allhallowtide. Wearing costumes and mumming has long been associated with festivals at other times of the year, such as on Christmas.[1] Halloween costumes are traditionally based on frightening supernatural or folkloric beings. However, by the 1930s costumes based on characters in mass media such as film, literature, and radio were popular. Halloween costumes have tended to be worn mainly by young people, but since the mid-20th century they have been increasingly worn by adults also.
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