The cowl's Kevlar panels provide a level of protection for his head against firearms. The front of the skull and the sides of the temples also have small armor inserts to increase the effectiveness of skull strikes and protect from concussive blows. Repeated encounters with the Mad Hatter also forced Batman to shield his cowl against the villain's mind control.

"Costume" often refers to a particular style of clothing worn to portray the wearer as a character or type of character at a social event in a theatrical performance on the stage or in film or television. In combination with other aspects of stagecraft, theatrical costumes can help actors portray characters' and their contexts as well as communicate information about the historical period/era, geographic location and time of day, season or weather of the theatrical performance. Some stylized theatrical costumes, such as Harlequin and Pantaloon in the Commedia dell'arte, exaggerate an aspect of a character.


During the recent Ends of the Earth Storyline, Spider-Man wore a new suit of armor designed to counter the abilities of the Sinister Six. It provided him with extra physical protection to withstand hits more blows from The Rhino as well as an immunity to Electro's Attacks. The helmet had audio sensors which could identify The Chameleon by the sound of his heartbeat and special vision modes to allow him to see through Mysterio's illusions as well as to track the particle of sand that holds Sandman's consciousness. The gauntlets were designed to shoot larger amounts of webbing than the traditional web-shooters as well as switching between his normal webbing and the new magnetic webbing. It also seems to enhance his physical strength.

Jump up ^ Kaplan, Arie (2008). From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books. The Jewish Publication Society. p. 120. ISBN 978-0827608436. In Uncanny X-Men #129 cover-dated Jan. 1979 and on sale in late 1978, writer Chris Claremont and the artist John Byrne created Katherine "Kitty" Pryde, aka Shadowcat, a young Jewish girl who possess the mutant ability to walk through walls.
To help with the rewrites, the production brought in Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, a playwright as well as well as a comic writer, having had a short run on Spectacular Spider-Man in 2006. After opening for a second time, the show once again received poor reviews, being called one of the worst Broadway shows of all time by New York Times critic Ben Brantley.
Diamond Collectibles has been released a number of Spider-Man figures for the Marvel Select line. They initially released an Ultimate Spider-Man figure, and subsequently released a Symbiote-suit Spider-Man, Iron Spider, Zombie Spider-Man, a classic Spider-Man, a Spider-Man from The Amazing Spider-Man (with unmasked and metallic variants), an Amazing Spider-Man 2 figure (with an unmasked variant), a Spectacular Spider-Man, and a Spider-Man: Homecoming Spider-Man figure.
Peter's parents suddenly appeared in his life, claiming to have been abducted by communists. He had learned to love his "parents" and even revealed to them his secret identity. They turned out to be robots invented by the Chameleon to infiltrate Peter's life, discover his connections to Spider-Man and then kill him. The robot that masqueraded as Peter's father Richard was perfectly willing to accomplish his task and kill Peter, but the Mary robot had learned to love Peter and saw him as good person. Richard turned into a vicious engine of destruction. Before Richard could finish Peter off, Mary killed him using an electric cable. In return she was killed by the Vulture who was conspiring with the Chameleon. An enraged Spider-Man completely pummeled the Vulture but was stopped by the cries of his dying "mother". She told Peter in her last moments that despite everything, she still loved him. Spider-Man vowed to track down the Chameleon and make him suffer, which he eventually did after fighting through many assassins sent by the communist. Peter ultimately spared an emotionally broken Chameleon and left him for the authorities.
Jump up ^ Marvel Characters, Inc.; DC Comics; United States Patent and Trademark Office (November 16, 2004). "Trademark Status & Document Retrieval". United States Patent and Trademark Office. Retrieved October 30, 2013. US Serial Number: 78356610 [...] Standard Character Claim: Yes. The mark consists of standard characters without claim to any particular font style, size, or color.
One day, Peter was at a science exhibit witnessing a scientist attempting to harness the power of radioactivity. Suddenly, a tiny spider fell, unseen by all, into the beam of radiation. Soon, that spider bit Peter on his hand. Dazed and woozy, Peter fled the room and accidentally ran into the path of an incoming car. Warned by a tingle in the back of his head, he quickly dodged the car. Somehow, he stuck to the wall he landed on. Crawling up the wall he grabbed and accidentally crushed a steel pipe. Then he started walking on a power line, with ease. Realizing the spider somehow its power to him, he began to wonder what to do with his new abilities. Soon after, Peter was walking down the street when he noticed a poster of a wrestling challenge. Thinking that this was another way to test his powers, he eagerly, ran home. After easily defeating his opponent, Crusher Hogan, a television promoter offered Peter (Peter was wearing a makeshift costume to protect his identity) a TV show.

I’d venture that a “super hero” as opposed to an ordinary hero, is someone who essentially devotes their life to being a hero as their foundation. In this sense, I *would* consider quasi-mythological figures such as Zorro or Robin Hood to be effectively superheroes, though they lack a lot of the stereotypes we’ve come to associate with superheroes. (Or perhaps not… depending on how you look at it.)
^ The Amazing Spider-Man #299 is the first appearance of Eddie Brock as Venom. The alien costume debuted from The Amazing Spider-Man #252 and the symbiote bonded to Spider-Man in Secret Wars #8.[8] Venom's creators are determined by pre-alien costume by not counting the creators/designers of the alien costume, David Michelinie or Mike Zeck, or the Marvel Comics fan who originally though of the concept for the creators.[8][159][160]
The following activities were a common feature of Halloween in Ireland and Britain during the 17th–20th centuries. Some have become more widespread and continue to be popular today. One common game is apple bobbing or dunking (which may be called "dooking" in Scotland)[165] in which apples float in a tub or a large basin of water and the participants must use only their teeth to remove an apple from the basin. A variant of dunking involves kneeling on a chair, holding a fork between the teeth and trying to drive the fork into an apple. Another common game involves hanging up treacle or syrup-coated scones by strings; these must be eaten without using hands while they remain attached to the string, an activity that inevitably leads to a sticky face. Another once-popular game involves hanging a small wooden rod from the ceiling at head height, with a lit candle on one end and an apple hanging from the other. The rod is spun round and everyone takes turns to try to catch the apple with their teeth.[166]
The Spider-Man Suit is a specialized suit used by Peter Parker to protect his identity as Spider-Man. Originally consisting of a hoodie with a spider symbol, blue pants, a blue shirt, and a red mask with black goggles to help him focus his senses, the suit received a "minor upgrade" from Tony Stark for Parker to use during the Clash of the Avengers. Stark allowed Parker to keep the suit after the Avengers Civil War.
In Ireland and Scotland, the turnip has traditionally been carved during Halloween,[124][125] but immigrants to North America used the native pumpkin, which is both much softer and much larger – making it easier to carve than a turnip.[124] The American tradition of carving pumpkins is recorded in 1837[126] and was originally associated with harvest time in general, not becoming specifically associated with Halloween until the mid-to-late 19th century.[127]
The first Halloween haunted house run by a nonprofit organization was produced in 1970 by the Sycamore-Deer Park Jaycees in Clifton, Ohio. It was cosponsored by WSAI, an AM radio station broadcasting out of Cincinnati, Ohio. It was last produced in 1982.[182] Other Jaycees followed suit with their own versions after the success of the Ohio house. The March of Dimes copyrighted a "Mini haunted house for the March of Dimes" in 1976 and began fundraising through their local chapters by conducting haunted houses soon after. Although they apparently quit supporting this type of event nationally sometime in the 1980s, some March of Dimes haunted houses have persisted until today.[183]
George Marston of Newsarama explaining why he felt that Spider-Man rogues gallery was the best was the thematic elements that the villains of Spider-Man manifested.[137] He explained that just like the superhero they have the same concept of science gone wrong. They are "like him, great men with great minds, great power, and great determination." But instead they fail to use their powers responsibly. Separating the thin line between being a hero from being a villain.[137]
Kirby disputed Lee's version of the story and claimed Lee had minimal involvement in the character's creation. According to Kirby, the idea for Spider-Man had originated with Kirby and Joe Simon, who in the 1950s had developed a character called the Silver Spider for the Crestwood Publications comic Black Magic, who was subsequently not used.[note 4] Simon, in his 1990 autobiography, disputed Kirby's account, asserting that Black Magic was not a factor, and that he (Simon) devised the name "Spider-Man" (later changed to "The Silver Spider"), while Kirby outlined the character's story and powers. Simon later elaborated that his and Kirby's character conception became the basis for Simon's Archie Comics superhero the Fly.[24] Artist Steve Ditko stated that Lee liked the name Hawkman from DC Comics, and that "Spider-Man" was an outgrowth of that interest.[21]
During the Character Creation process, a "difficulty slider" allows the player to adjust their skin color, with white, Caucasian skin being 'easy' and dark black skin being 'very hard', though the Coon reminds the player, "this doesn't affect combat, just about every other aspect of your whole life." The slider was nonetheless picked up in many news outlets as genuine, with many subsequently expressing displeasure that its effects in the final game are relatively small.

The most recent incident occurred over the weekend. During a conference on freedom of speech, Greg Lukianoff reportedly said, “Looking at the reaction to Erika Christakis’s email, you would have thought someone wiped out an entire Indian village.” An attendee posted that quote to Facebook. “The online Facebook post led a group of Native American women, other students of color and their supporters to protest the conference in an impromptu gathering outside of LC 102, where the Buckley event was taking place,” the Yale Daily News reported.
Working through his grief, Parker eventually develops tentative feelings toward Watson, and the two "become confidants rather than lovers".[62] A romantic relationship eventually develops, with Parker proposing to her in issue #182 (July 1978), and being turned down an issue later.[63] Parker went on to graduate from college in issue #185,[49] and becomes involved with the shy Debra Whitman and the extroverted, flirtatious costumed thief Felicia Hardy, the Black Cat,[64] whom he meets in issue #194 (July 1979).[49]

Although supposedly designed for maximum flexibility and movement, the Nomex armor does restrict Batman's movement somewhat, slowing him down in combat. The design of the mask and cape also restricted his neck movement, making it impossible for him to turn his head, and forcing him to rely on peripheral vision. For these reasons, Bruce asked Lucius to design a new suit with faster, freer movement in mind.


What if someone else besides Spider-Man had been bitten by the radioactive spider explores what would have happened if Flash Thompson, Betty Brant or John Jameson were bitten by the spider, but all three prove to be failures as the 'new' Spider-Man. Each story ends with Peter extracting the residual radioactive venom from the dead spider and using it to create a serum to give himself powers, thus becoming Spider-Man.[47] Versions of all three appear in Spider-Verse where John is the only one that isn't killed by the Inheritors.[citation needed]
The word Halloween or Hallowe'en dates to about 1745[31] and is of Christian origin.[32] The word "Hallowe'en" means "hallowed evening" or "holy evening".[33] It comes from a Scottish term for All Hallows' Eve (the evening before All Hallows' Day).[34] In Scots, the word "eve" is even, and this is contracted to e'en or een. Over time, (All) Hallow(s) E(v)en evolved into Hallowe'en. Although the phrase "All Hallows'" is found in Old English "All Hallows' Eve" is itself not seen until 1556.[34][35]
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