In the Amalgam Comics continuity, Spider-Man was combined with DC's Superboy to create Spider-Boy. He was featured in Spider-Boy #1 (April 1996) and Spider-Boy Team-Up #1 (June 1997). In this continuity, Spider-Boy is the clone of researcher Peter Parker, created during an explosion in the Project Cadmus Labs. Adopted by Cadmus director General Thunderbolt Ross, he is given the name "Pete Ross". Spider-Boy's power is the ability to redirect his own personal gravity, giving him the ability to climb walls, and to increase his strength. He is able to shoot webs using a special "Web Gun" developed by Cadmus. Spider-Boy is an honorary member of the Legion of Galactic Guardians 2099 (an amalgamation of DC's Legion of Super-Heroes and Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy plus the Marvel 2099 timeline). He is seen in the background during Spider-Verse to fight the Inheritors.
Set during Peter Parker's first year with powers, the series draws from multiple sources, including the modern comics (such as the Spider-Island storyline). Early on, Peter is accepted into Horizon High, an extremely prestigious scientific school run by Max Modell. He encounters several of his future foes in the school, and battles his familiar cast of villains like the Green Goblin, the Vulture, the Jackal and Doctor Octopus. He also meets and teams up with several members of the Avengers, such as Iron Man, Hulk and Black Widow.

Spider-Man first appears in the episode Along Came A spider where he helps Captain America fight the serpent society He next appears in New Avengers where he leads the New lineup of Avengers against Kang...after the victory and return of the Original Avengers he officially becomes a member (although a reserve one). The last time he appeared was Avengers Assemble amongst the rest of Earth's heroes fighting The Heralds of Galactus.
He has other options when it comes to which type of scary clown he’ll be dressing up as, including Twisty the Clown from American Horror Story. One of our most popular is Carver the Clown. With his gruesome mask and bright red hair, he looks just bloodcurdling enough that he could indeed live up to his name. If your son is the type who likes to jump out from behind doors and yell “Boo,” he’ll be thrilled with all the possibilities for causing hair-raising shrieks when he wears one of our boys scary clown costumes.
while witnessing a radiology experiment would be bitten on his hand by a radioactive spider. He then starts to find that he has amazing powers. He realizes that he has the spider's leaping, wall-crawling, spider sense, increased endurance, and super strength. He made himself a red and blue outfit and mask and produces a web-spinning fluid enabling him to swing from the buildings above the streets of Manhattan. Peter's first enemy would be the person who had killed his Uncle Ben. Uncle Ben would be killed by a burglar, a criminal that had ran past Peter earlier at the television studio. Peter didn't really care at the time and didn't help the police. This lead to Uncle Ben's death. Angry and upset, Peter sought his Uncle's murderer and webs him. After this tragedy, Peter would become a costumed crime fighter protecting New York. Peter Parker would be voiced by Bernard Cowan, Spider-Man would be voiced by Paul Soles, Len Carlson voiced Captain Stacy, Peg Dixon voiced Betty Brant, and Paul Kligman voiced J. Jonah Jameson. This series would also be well known for its theme song. It was performed by a vocal group with lyrics written by Paul Francis Webster and quick-tempo instrumentals performed by Bob Harris, published by Buddah Music, Inc. Lyrics "Spider-Man. Spider-Man. Does whatever a spider can. Spins a web, any size. Catches thieves- just like flies. Look out! Here comes the Spider-Man! Is he strong? Listen, bud. He's got radioactive blood. Can he swing, from a thread? Take a look overhead. Hey, there! There goes the Spider-Man! In the chill of night, at the scene of a crime. Like a streak of light, he arrives just in time! Spider-Man. Spider-Man. Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man. Wealth and fame? He's ignored. Action is his reward. To him, life is a great big bang-up. Wherever there's a hang-up, you'll find the Spider-Man!"
In the Spider-Verse storyline when multiple Spider-Men are being hunted across parallel universes, they find a safe haven in Earth-13, a world where Peter Parker still possesses the Enigma Force. Although this power cannot be used in other universes as it is tied to the dimension of its origin, this Spider-Man reasoned that he would be able to protect the other Spiders from the Inheritors if they attacked his home universe.[25] This strategy proves to be flawed when the Inheritors' father Solus, attacks his world, proclaiming that the Enigma-Force is pure life force. While it may prove to be too much for any of his children to handle, his own greater power is able to consume it allowing him to devour this Spider-Man's lifeforce.[30]
Determined to make his short time on Earth count, Gerry designs his own Spider-Man costume and equipment based from his idol's, and convinces his mother to train him in how to use his powers. Calling himself Spider-Man, he meets Spider-Girl, and the two initially clash.[9] During a fight between several villains, a bullet intended for Spider-Man kills one of the villains when Spider-Girl shoves him out of its way. Upset that he was responsible for a death, Gerry runs into Darkdevil, who trains him to be a more effective crime fighter. At the request of Peter Parker, the original Spider-Man, Gerry decides to retire from super heroic adventuring while Reed Richards searches for a cure for his blood disease.[volume & issue needed]
^ Besides being most notable as a Spider-Man supervillain. He has also been depicted as a Fantastic Four antagonist in Stan Lee and Jack Kirby comics books (mostly due to being introduced as the original Frightful Four[142]) along with being on the heroic side (being a Avengers member[143]) until being introduced as a tragic supervillain in the Spider-Man comics once again.[144]
Jump up ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 24. ISBN 978-0756692360. The Brain is an early Mobile Computer prototype built by I.C.M. in Midtown High School, where Peter Parker attended, it was deemed obsolete after Spidey's first encounter with it but it came back again.
Gabriel : Gwen's son by Norman Osborn. Norman convinced Gabriel and his sister, Sarah, that Peter Parker was their father and had killed their mother. Although Sarah is persuaded otherwise, Gabriel continues to believe so and takes on the identity of the "Gray" Goblin. After a confrontation with Spider-Man, he crashed into the river on his glider and lost his memories. Sarah took him to their home in France to recover. After failing to convince Sarah to join him, he flies off on a different glider. Introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man #509.
In an alternate future Spider-Man is a old man who got paralyzed from a LMD(Life Model Decoy) Deadpool doppelganger and lives in a retirement home with a old man Deadpool. Unknown to Spider-Man, Oldpool was giving his blood to Peter so he wouldn't die. In a battle between LMD Deadpools, Oldpool uses a time machine and mistakenly switches places with the mainstream Deadpool. After they got to the main timeline they are reunited with the main Spider-Man and Oldpool. Then after stoping Master Matrix (the LMD master created from Peter's parents), Old Man Peter and Oldpool fade away to their timeline.
Reaction to Spider-Man's rogues gallery has been overwhelmingly positive with many journalists citing it as one of the greatest comic book rogues galleries of all time,[133][134][135] with Batman's rogues gallery being its most rivaled contender.[136][137] Although editors such as The Hollywood Reporter's Graeme McMillan felt that only Flash's rogues gallery can compete with Spider-Man's rogues.[134] Kyle Schmidlin of What Culture! described the superhero's rogues gallery as "one of the most colorful in comics" explaining that Batman could only be debated as having a great number of enemies as good as Spider-Man.[138] IGN staff editors, Joshua Yehl and Jesse Schedeen, described the Spider-Man villains as "one of the most iconic and well-balanced in comics". They opined that the scope of their schemes, how cool their powers are, and how dramatically they have affected Spider-Man's life is what makes the Spider-Man villains so great.[1] Newsarama ranked Spider-Man's rogues gallery as number one out ten as the greatest rogues gallery of all time.[137]
In Old Man Logan, Spider-Man was killed during or sometime after the event where the villains rose to power and the heroes fell. In this timeline, he is implied to have married an unknown African-American woman and had a daughter who eventually married Hawkeye and had a child of their own. Hawkeye won in a poker game and customized the Spider-Mobile after his death.[89]
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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