In the animated show The Batman (2004–2008), the Batsuit resembles the Batman: The Animated Series suit, but has shorter ears on the cowl, has claws on the fingertips of the gloves, a slightly redesigned bat symbol with the yellow ellipse on his chest, a more high-tech computerized utility belt linking to the Batcave's computer system called the "Batwave," and a longer cape that, just like the Batman: TAS costume, sometimes behaves like a cloak, draped over the Batman's body. In the episode "Fleurs Du Mal," shown that the suit is linked to the Batwave, to monitor his physical and mental activities. Despite this regular default Batsuit, Batman uses some other variations of the Batsuit as well in the series to tackle certain situations and villains.

Wonder Woman has finally made her debut on the silver screen, and for us, we’re just glad to have her around! There’s no saying what threats could be facing the world, so having the Amazing Amazonian around for backup seems like a good idea. If you’d like to make sure you have an Amazing Amazon of your own to help save the day, we’re sure your girl will be up for playing the part. Just accessorize her signature movie look with the included armbands, gauntlets, and headpiece, and she’ll have the style look that made Princess Diana of Themyscira famous. Let her pose with and give a stunning and stoic look towards the camera. The bad guys won’t stand a chance when your girl is on the DC Comics team!


And there’s (at least) one more angle to this as well…where did the idea of the superhero come from? As Meg suggested to me at dinner last night, was there a cultural need for a superhero during a super-crisis like the Great Depression? Or did the idea evolve gradually from regular heros (cowboys, space cowboys, etc.) to heros who were magicians (with special powers…it’s not that much of a stretch to imagine a magician possessing supernatural powers) to classic superheroes like Superman?

During the Abraxas Saga,[28][29] a team of Avengers-esque super heroes called the Law Enforcement Squad appeared in Earth-616. They were headed by an intelligent version of the Hulk who was not Bruce Banner. Joining this strange version of the behemoth were the World War II-era heroes Red Raven, Bucky, Namora and The Whizzer (Bob Frank). Other members included a heroic version of the Spider-Man villain The Rose, Doctor Druid, Living Lightning, the Shroud and a male Captain Universe.[volume & issue needed] (The membership of the Law Enforcement Squad paralleled the membership of DC Comics' Justice Society of America.[original research?] Captain Universe was the equivalent of DC's Starman.[original research?])
For her trouble, a faction of students are now trying to get the couple removed from their residential positions, which is to say, censured and ousted from their home on campus. Hundreds of Yale students are attacking them, some with hateful insults, shouted epithets, and a campaign of public shaming. In doing so, they have shown an illiberal streak that flows from flaws in their well-intentioned ideology.
His actions were violent, and the Jackal revealed he had been engineered to kill the real Peter, Ben, Kaine and Mary Jane. The Jackal further assisted "Peter" by giving him detailed info on various villains and allies of Spider-Man. As a joke, the Jackal said this "Peter" would commit mass "spidercide" on his behalf.[1] Spidercide stole a container of ribonucleic nanocontagium from the genetic research firm Genetech which lead him to have a confront with the New Warriors.[2] Using these materials, Spidercide and the Jackal killed 2600 people in Springville, Pennsylvania by releasing an airborne version of the Carrion virus. This same incident triggered the powers of Helix.[3]
We find out in Batman V Superman Dawn of Justice just what it takes to save the day; two superheroes at odds, one bad guy to show up out of the blue, and a superheroine to come in and bail the boys out. Your group of children can become this cinematic version of the Justice League when they go in these authentic DC Comics movie costumes. You might discourage your pint-sized Batman taking on the boy in the Superman costume, but we’re sure when Wonder Woman shows up on the scene they’ll be on their best behavior. Have them pose before their adventure by having them put their hands on their hips while they are lined up in a row. With the fate of the world on the line, they’ll be prepared and ready to save the day!
^ The Amazing Spider-Man #299 is the first appearance of Eddie Brock as Venom. The alien costume debuted from The Amazing Spider-Man #252 and the symbiote bonded to Spider-Man in Secret Wars #8.[8] Venom's creators are determined by pre-alien costume by not counting the creators/designers of the alien costume, David Michelinie or Mike Zeck, or the Marvel Comics fan who originally though of the concept for the creators.[8][159][160]
Spider-Man's plight was to be misunderstood and persecuted by the very public that he swore to protect. In the first issue of The Amazing Spider-Man, J. Jonah Jameson, publisher of the Daily Bugle, launches an editorial campaign against the "Spider-Man menace." The resulting negative publicity exacerbates popular suspicions about the mysterious Spider-Man and makes it impossible for him to earn any more money by performing. Eventually, the bad press leads the authorities to brand him an outlaw. Ironically, Peter finally lands a job as a photographer for Jameson's Daily Bugle.[9]:212
As for the reason for Superhero’s; I think her’s (or ‘super’ heros) were always needed. It’s jsut earlier superhero’s like cowboys are not seen as super now. However, they were much better than the average at gunslinging and all had colerfull names and personalities. I think we the dawn of the 30s and in even earlier in the post World War I era, people realized that a gun slinging cowboy could not save them. People demanded (or wanted) hero’s with more powers. Hero’s that would not be plowed down by machine guns and rifles. Hense superman was made. As street crime began to dominate people’s fears, less super-human heros like Batman appeared.
American historian and author Ruth Edna Kelley of Massachusetts wrote the first book-length history of Halloween in the US; The Book of Hallowe'en (1919), and references souling in the chapter "Hallowe'en in America".[145] In her book, Kelley touches on customs that arrived from across the Atlantic; "Americans have fostered them, and are making this an occasion something like what it must have been in its best days overseas. All Halloween customs in the United States are borrowed directly or adapted from those of other countries".[146]
Black Widow of the Avengers knows a thing or two about kicking butt and taking names, and it doesn’t matter if she’s teaming up with the Cap, Hawkeye, or just striking out solo. When she’s ready to throw down, it’s time to put all villains on notice. Recreate her Captain America: Civil War look with this stunning movie costume ; all you’ll need to complete the style is a wig for her signature long red hair.

When night falls in South Park, Cartman takes up the call and dons the Coon costume. This fearless crime fighter is the only one who can sort through the trash can of society. As the founder of Coon and Friends, the Coon is the mastermind behind the greatest superhero franchise of all time and will stop at nothing to see it realized. Thinks Eric Cartman is handsome and cool.


The Marvel Zombies universe features a Spider-Man who has been turned into a flesh-eating zombie after being infected by Zombie Captain America.[12] Although Spider-Man is just as ravenous as the other zombies when hungry, when he has eaten, Spider-Man is racked with guilt at what he has done, especially for having eaten Mary Jane and Aunt May, but unable to change his nature.[13] At the conclusion of the original series, Spider-Man is one of the heroes who become The Galacti, having consumed the original Galactus and subsequently acquiring his cosmic powers.[14]
This incarnation of Spider-Man has the same powers as his classical counterpart: enhanced strength, speed, reflexes, durability and agility proportionate of a spider, along with a sixth sense which warns him of unseen danger, also known as "spider-sense" and the ability to shoot organic webbing from his wrists and adhere to sheer walls and other solid surfaces.[2] Like the traditional Spider-Man, he uses his acrobatic agility to maneuver about the rooftops and uses his webbing as nets to both stun and capture his enemies.[3] He also has a huge network of contacts throughout the city and several informants in all the gangs.[6]
He has built many devices in his career as Spider-Man and is a skilled photographer and teacher. He has developed a unique style of combat through the years. Spider-Man, even before his training from Shang-Chi, has gone toe to toe with even the best marvel fighters. His spider-sense alone is like a close combat expert and combined with Spider-Man's reflexes and physical attributes, make it very difficult for Street-levelers to defeat him when he is not holding back.
While brooding in his study over how to be a more effective crime fighter, Bruce Wayne saw a bat come through his window (in the earliest Detective Comics portrayal simply flying in an open window, in Post-Crisis continuity such as Batman: Year One, dramatically crashing through the glass) and perch on the bust of his father. Realizing that "criminals are a superstitious, cowardly lot," Bruce adopts the persona of a bat in order to conceal his identity and strike fear into his adversaries. Subsequent origin tales have had Bruce terrified by bats as a child, and observing a bat costume worn by his father at a costume ball, but the primary impetus of his decision to adopt the bat persona has always been the incident of the bat coming in the window of his study. It is as a result of this incident that the batsuit was developed.
After the " Other" story arc, Tony Stark designed for Peter a specialized Red & Gold costume that is similar to Tony Stark's Iron Man costume. It was designated as Spider-Man Armored Fighting suit Version 1.1 which was made of a liquid nano-fiber. It provided Peter with the added functions of a short-ranged gliding function, increased strength, heat-resistant Kevlar microfiber that provided resistance to small caliber bullets, built-in fire, police and emergency scanners, visual amplifications such as infrared and ultraviolet, carbon filter in the mouth to prevent inhalation of airborne toxins, and a short-range GPS microwave communication system. All of which are controlled in the computerized control system in the titanium chest piece in the costume. Another very useful addition was a stealth mode which allowed Spider-Man to blend with the environment or even disappear completely in some backgrounds. Along with this came the customization option to instantly switch between any former style he's worn (Spidey suit, black suit, normal clothes, etc); all on the same suit. It also contained three retractable spider legs called "waldoes" which can be used as offensive weapons. Spidey wore this costume before and during the Civil War but Tony, in order to keep an eye on Peter, had the costume feed him with information about Peter, notably the Spider-Sense. When Peter revealed that he was going to switch sides and fought Iron Man, the latter used a voice activated override which incapacitated Peter for a while. He had already known about this and used his computer expertise to disable the override and managed to defeat Iron Man with a surprise attack. He then discarded the costume and returned to wear his original costume when he joined Captain America's team during the Civil War. The members of the initiative team known as the Scarlet Spiders would start wearing costumes of similar design and functions.
Joey Esposito of IGN, who gave the first issue an 8.5 out of 10, praised the creative team, singling out the strong thematic elements set up by Bendis, and the graceful line work, cityscapes, action and comedic timing of Pichelli's art. Esposito also complimented Cory Petit's lettering, comparing his use of different fonts when Spider-Man arrives in the Ultimate Universe to the use of color that characterizes Dorothy's arrival in Oz in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz.[12] James Hunt of Comic Book Resources, who gave the issue four and a half out of five stars, called it "one of the most momentous Spider-Man stories to be published in years", praising the issue's pace and tone, and Pichelli's art.[13]
Rapper Kanye West makes a return to the South Park world, having fully teansformed into a "Gay Fish" (his only identification in the game) and seeking Sea-Man and the player's help to guide his "momma" to Heaven aboard a unicorn that farts rainbows. This is a reference to 'Only One', a real mobile game West is making about his real mother's ascension to Heaven.
A previously unknown translation of an ancient grimoire, the Darkhold, has been unearthed by archaeologists in South America. But this chilling discovery will have far-reaching effects. Halfway across the globe, the Darkhold is relentlessly pursued by the Cabal of Scrier, an organization devoted to achieving ultimate power through whatever means necessary. And it is through their actions that a darkness from beyond the grave will return to haunt the Spectacular Spider-Man in the form of one of the most frightening and dangerous foes he's ever encountered....
Spider-Man has been featured numerous times in Hasbro's Marvel Legends series. He first appeared in the Movie Sandman Build-a-Figure wave in both his outfit from the first movie and his black costume from Spider-Man 3. He was next featured in the Arnim Zola Build-a-Figure series, this time sporting his Big Time costume. The movie version of Spider-Man from The Amazing Spider-Man 2 was then featured in the Ultimate Green Goblin Build-a-Figure wave. A classic version of Spider-Man was later featured in the Hobgoblin Build-a-Figure wave, nicknamed "Pizza Spidey" by fans due to the presence of a slice of pizza. The Ultimate version of Spider-Man was then featured in the Space Venom Build-a-Figure series. The Symbiote version of Spider-Man then appeared in the Sandman Build-a-Figure wave. A Spider-Man: Homecoming-themed wave was then launched, with Vulture's wings as the "Build-a-Vehicle" this time. The line featured the movie version of Spider-Man in his costume and his homemade suit, as well as Cosmic Spider-Man. Spider-Man has also been featured in several two-packs and box sets, including a Captain America: Civil War-themed set that included Iron Man and Captain America, and a two-pack with Ultimate Vulture.

As Thanos begins to activate the completed Infinity Gaunlet, he is attacked by Thor who is able to severely wound him with his new axe Stormbreaker, but is unable to stop Thanos from activating the gauntlet despite the injuries he inflicted on Thanos. As half of all life across the universe disintegrates, including White Wolf, Black Panther, Groot, Scarlet Witch, Falcon, Mantis, Drax, Star-Lord, Doctor Strange and Spider-Man; Thanos teleports away to an unknown planet to recover from the wounds inflicted by Thor. Let stunned by their inability to stop Thanos and the deaths of their friends; The remaining heroes Iron Man, Nebula, Bruce, M'Baku, Okoye, War Machine, Rocket, Steve, Black Widow, and Thor are left on their respective battlefields of Wakanda and Titan are wondering what to do next.
With Leeds's help, Spider-Man tracked Toomes to an old warehouse. Parker questioned Toomes's criminal activity and what he was doing to his family, but Toomes simply waited to activate his Exo-Suit; once it did, he began attacking Spider-Man. Peter dodged every attack and quipped at Toomes, but later realized that Toomes sought to destroy the beams of the warehouse. The wings smashed through the last supporting beam of the warehouse, and debris collapsed upon Spider-Man. Vulture equipped his suit and left Spider-Man to die.
A tokusatsu series featuring Spider-Man was produced by Toei and aired in Japan. It is commonly referred to by its Japanese pronunciation "Supaidā-Man".[187] Spider-Man also appeared in other print forms besides the comics, including novels, children's books, and the daily newspaper comic strip The Amazing Spider-Man, which debuted in January 1977, with the earliest installments written by Stan Lee and drawn by John Romita, Sr.[188] Spider-Man has been adapted to other media including games, toys, collectibles, and miscellaneous memorabilia, and has appeared as the main character in numerous computer and video games on over 15 gaming platforms.
A popular variant of trick-or-treating, known as trunk-or-treating (or Halloween tailgaiting), occurs when "children are offered treats from the trunks of cars parked in a church parking lot", or sometimes, a school parking lot.[113][152] In a trunk-or-treat event, the trunk (boot) of each automobile is decorated with a certain theme,[153] such as those of children's literature, movies, scripture, and job roles.[154] Trunk-or-treating has grown in popularity due to its perception as being more safe than going door to door, a point that resonates well with parents, as well as the fact that it "solves the rural conundrum in which homes [are] built a half-mile apart".[155][156]

While brooding in his study over how to be a more effective crime fighter, Bruce Wayne saw a bat come through his window (in the earliest Detective Comics portrayal simply flying in an open window, in Post-Crisis continuity such as Batman: Year One, dramatically crashing through the glass) and perch on the bust of his father. Realizing that "criminals are a superstitious, cowardly lot," Bruce adopts the persona of a bat in order to conceal his identity and strike fear into his adversaries. Subsequent origin tales have had Bruce terrified by bats as a child, and observing a bat costume worn by his father at a costume ball, but the primary impetus of his decision to adopt the bat persona has always been the incident of the bat coming in the window of his study. It is as a result of this incident that the batsuit was developed.


Captain Universe was the starring feature in issues #9-11 of the tryout series Marvel Spotlight. Marvel Spotlight editor Al Milgrom recalled being taken away by the concept of a Captain Universe serial: "You could come up with three issues, three disparate individuals - each one very different from the other - and see how they use their powers. They wouldn't necessarily be superheroic types; they'd be regular people who fell into the powers for just one issue. ... But Captain Universe never got his own title, so I'm guessing it didn't sell terribly well."[1] The character appeared sporadically through the remainder of the 1980s in titles such as Marvel Fanfare and Contest of Champions.
In parts of Britain, these customs came under attack during the Reformation as some Protestants berated purgatory as a "popish" doctrine incompatible with their notion of predestination. Thus, for some Nonconformist Protestants, the theology of All Hallows' Eve was redefined; without the doctrine of purgatory, "the returning souls cannot be journeying from Purgatory on their way to Heaven, as Catholics frequently believe and assert. Instead, the so-called ghosts are thought to be in actuality evil spirits. As such they are threatening."[101] Other Protestants maintained belief in an intermediate state, known as Hades (Bosom of Abraham),[107] and continued to observe the original customs, especially souling, candlelit processions and the ringing of church bells in memory of the dead.[71][108] Mark Donnelly, a professor of medieval archæology, and historian Daniel Diehl, with regard to the evil spirits, on Halloween, write that "barns and homes were blessed to protect people and livestock from the effect of witches, who were believed to accompany the malignant spirits as they traveled the earth."[109] In the 19th century, in some rural parts of England, families gathered on hills on the night of All Hallows' Eve. One held a bunch of burning straw on a pitchfork while the rest knelt around him in a circle, praying for the souls of relatives and friends until the flames went out. This was known as teen'lay.[110] The rising popularity of Guy Fawkes Night (5 November) from 1605 onward, saw many Halloween traditions appropriated by that holiday instead, and Halloween's popularity waned in Britain, with the noteworthy exception of Scotland.[111] There and in Ireland, they had been celebrating Samhain and Halloween since at least the early Middle Ages, and the Scottish kirk took a more pragmatic approach to Halloween, seeing it as important to the life cycle and rites of passage of communities and thus ensuring its survival in the country.[111]
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