^ The Chameleon is the first member of Spider-Man's rogues gallery in publication date. (Excluding the Burglar).[9] He is also well known to be related to Kraven the Hunter and Kraven to him. That revealed relationship helped evolve him as a major villain compared to his original depiction of being just a solo villain in the original issue of The Amazing Spider-Man.[139][140][141]

In this example, the objects or instances are the individual superheroes described by the class Superhero. There could be an Ironman object, a Wonder Woman object, a Batman object, or a Spiderman object. The class Superhero associates certain attributes and methods with the superhero objects. For this example, each superhero will have the following attributes: strength, superpower, costume color, secret identity, points, and health. Additionally, each superhero will have the following methods (or actions): attack and heal.


In subsequent decades, popular characters like Dazzler, She-Hulk, Elektra, Catwoman, Witchblade, Spider-Girl, Batgirl and the Birds of Prey became stars of long-running eponymous titles. Female characters began assuming leadership roles in many ensemble superhero teams; the Uncanny X-Men series and its related spin-off titles in particular have included many female characters in pivotal roles since the 1970s.[33] Volume 4 of the X-Men comic book series featured an all-female team as part of the Marvel NOW! branding initiative in 2013.[34] Superpowered female characters like Buffy the Vampire Slayer[35] and Darna[36][37] have a tremendous influence on popular culture in their respective countries of origin.
“First published in 1930, Gladiator is the tale of Hugo Danner, a man endowed from birth with extraordinary strength and speed. But Danner is no altruist. He spends his life trying to cope with his abilities, becoming a sports hero in college, later a sideshow act, a war hero, never truly finding peace with himself. The character of Danner inspired both Superman’s creators, and Lester Dent’s Doc Savage. But Wylie, an editor with the New Yorker, sought to develop more than a pulp hero. His Gladiator provides surprising insights into the difficulties suffered by the truly gifted when born in our midst.” 

His actions were violent, and the Jackal revealed he had been engineered to kill the real Peter, Ben, Kaine and Mary Jane. The Jackal further assisted "Peter" by giving him detailed info on various villains and allies of Spider-Man. As a joke, the Jackal said this "Peter" would commit mass "spidercide" on his behalf.[1] Spidercide stole a container of ribonucleic nanocontagium from the genetic research firm Genetech which lead him to have a confront with the New Warriors.[2] Using these materials, Spidercide and the Jackal killed 2600 people in Springville, Pennsylvania by releasing an airborne version of the Carrion virus. This same incident triggered the powers of Helix.[3]

Jump up ^ Thomson, Thomas; Annandale, Charles (1896). A History of the Scottish People from the Earliest Times: From the Union of the kingdoms, 1706, to the present time. Blackie. Archived from the original on 21 June 2013. Retrieved 31 October 2011. Of the stated rustic festivals peculiar to Scotland the most important was Hallowe'en, a contraction for All-hallow Evening, or the evening of All-Saints Day, the annual return of which was a season for joy and festivity.
Unseen scientist Mister Fantastic constructed large, transforming battle armour for various superhumans; Spider-Man received two, one based on each of his costumes, both of which could transform into a high-speed motorcycle. It is likely Richards gained the idea from Spider-Man, as it is inconceivable the encounter with the Transformers wouldn't have a lasting impact on the vigilante.[1]
Spider-Man Noir or just Spider-Man (Peter Parker) is a fictional character, a superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. This alternate version of Spider-Man is a darker take on Spider-Man and the mythos is set in 1933 – during the Great Depression and is a part of the Marvel Noir universe. An inexperienced but idealistic apprentice of a respected yet troubled reporter, Peter Parker is accidentally bitten by an illegally imported and highly-venomous spider, while secretly investigating a smuggling ring of ancient spider statues. Instead of killing him, the bite gave him super-human abilities, similar to that of a spider. Taking advantage of his new abilities, Parker begins to wage a one-man war against the criminal underworld in New York City as a brutal and feared vigilante, known as the "Spider-Man", partly to avenge the deaths of his uncle Ben Parker and his mentor: Ben Urich, at the hands of the city's major crime lord: Norman Osborn.
Jump up ^ Skelly, Tim. "Interview II: 'I created an army of characters, and now my connection to them is lost.'" (Initially broadcast over WNUR-FM on "The Great Electric Bird", May 14, 1971. Transcribed and published in The Nostalgia Journal #27.) Reprinted in The Comics Journal Library Volume One: Jack Kirby, George, Milo ed. May 2002, Fantagraphics Books. p. 16
Development of artifacts and symbols associated with Halloween formed over time. Jack-o'-lanterns are traditionally carried by guisers on All Hallows' Eve in order to frighten evil spirits.[97][120] There is a popular Irish Christian folktale associated with the jack-o'-lantern,[121] which in folklore is said to represent a "soul who has been denied entry into both heaven and hell":[122]
Perhaps, Spider-Man's most famous piece of equipment is his self built web-shooters which allow him to shoot sticky ropes of webbing which he uses to swing from building to building. They are a pair of special wrist devices of Peter's own design that contain a material that mixes with air to web-like material. They can be used in many different ways by varying the pressure and adjusting the nozzles of the spinnerets. They can take the form of strong thin lines, as fine quick spreading lines, or as a thick adhesive liquid. Spider-Man can either use the webbing as web-gloves to protect his hands, as a Web-Parachute, an air-proof Web-Dome, a Web-Shield that offers protection from bullets and energy blasts, as small "web-bullets" that bounce off opponents, use the webbing to ensnare an opponent, tie foes up with a rope and hang them upside down from vertical poles, pulling his foes towards him, or shoot them in any direction he chooses Spider-Man's primary means of transportation is by the use of his webbing to swing around the city. He shoots a strand of webbing to a high location, like the edge of a building, and pushes his body towards any direction he chooses while holding on to the web, allowing him to traverse at an accelerated speed. This artificial webbing lasts for an hour before fading away. More recently he has evolved biological web shooters that spray webbing from his forearms but this power has been erased by Mephisto after the One More Day storyline.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 72. ISBN 978-0756692360. Writer Gerry Conway and artist Ross Andru introduced two major new characters to Spider-Man's world and the Marvel Universe in this self-contained issue. Not only would the vigilante known as the Punisher go on to be one of the most important and iconic Marvel creations of the 1970s, but his instigator, the Jackal, would become the next big threat in Spider-Man's life.

Add your other half and the kids for a night of Halloween fun the entire family will remember, and get matching costumes for everyone! Become a king and queen with the little members of royalty, dress them up as their favorite farm animals, turn them into little Halloween monsters, and more. They'll love joining enchanted lands and making their own unforgettable memories with you!

Kirby disputed Lee's version of the story and claimed Lee had minimal involvement in the character's creation. According to Kirby, the idea for Spider-Man had originated with Kirby and Joe Simon, who in the 1950s had developed a character called the Silver Spider for the Crestwood Publications comic Black Magic, who was subsequently not used.[note 4] Simon, in his 1990 autobiography, disputed Kirby's account, asserting that Black Magic was not a factor, and that he (Simon) devised the name "Spider-Man" (later changed to "The Silver Spider"), while Kirby outlined the character's story and powers. Simon later elaborated that his and Kirby's character conception became the basis for Simon's Archie Comics superhero the Fly.[24] Artist Steve Ditko stated that Lee liked the name Hawkman from DC Comics, and that "Spider-Man" was an outgrowth of that interest.[21]

On All Hallows' Eve, Christians in some parts of the world visit cemeteries to pray and place flowers and candles on the graves of their loved ones.[81] The top photograph shows Bangladeshi Christians lighting candles on the headstone of a relative, while the bottom photograph shows Lutheran Christians praying and lighting candles in front of the central crucifix of a graveyard.

By 1995, the suit was eventually modified, the cloak becoming a scalloped-edged cape and the gloves becoming gauntlets with three “fins” with claws embedded in the fingers for climbing. Famously drawn by the likes of Neal Adams and Jim Aparo, he eventually created a unique fire-retardant and chemical-resistant triple-weave Kevlar thread for the suit. The material had carbon nanotube fibers that imparted it with a unique sheen and made it heavily resistant to tearing. This material would go into the creation of all following bat-suits and other suits in the Bat Family. The most notable traits of this evolution were the incorporation of the yellow ellipse around the bat emblem as well as the capsule utility belt.

The practice may have originated in a Celtic festival, held on 31 October–1 November, to mark the beginning of winter. It was called Samhain in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, and Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Cornwall and Brittany. The festival is believed to have pre-Christian roots. After the Christianization of Ireland in the 5th century, some of these customs may have been retained in the Christian observance of All Hallows' Eve in that region—which continued to be called Samhain/Calan Gaeaf—blending the traditions of their ancestors with Christian ones.[2][3] It was seen as a liminal time, when the spirits or fairies (the Aos Sí), and the souls of the dead, could more easily come into our world.[4] It was believed that the Aos Sí needed to be propitiated to ensure that the people and their livestock survived the winter.
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