The time between Spider-Man capturing the burglar that killed Uncle Ben and him becoming a superhero was told over 30 years after his origin when the Amazing Fantasy series was continued in 1995 by writer Kurt Busiek (#16-18, Dec. 1995 – Mar. 1996). After catching the burglar that killed Ben, Peter had given up being Spider-Man as it reminded him of his irresponsible behavior that ultimately led to his uncle’s death. Even though Maxie Shiffman, the agent he had hired when he was a costumed wrestler, was putting out ads to track down Spider-Man, Peter didn’t want anything to do with that life. Ben had been the only earner in the family and after his death Peter and his Aunt May were struggling for money. A salesman tried to con May into buying furniture that Ben had apparently left a deposit on before his death. Although the salesman had seemed genuine at the time, Peter caught Mr. Vale pulling the same stunt on an old widower when he was swinging through the city in his Spider-Man costume to clear his head. Spider-Man followed Mr. Vale to a warehouse where he discovered a whole gang of organized criminals led by The Undertaker. Spider-Man challenged the gang and soon had them rounded up for the police. Chronologically this was the first time Spider-Man had been threatened with a gun. More significantly, during the fight he discovered his Spider-Sense for the first time. Capturing these criminals lead Peter to believe that this is how he has to make up for Uncle Ben’s death, by using his powers to help others.

In the recent Spider-Girl storyline "Brand New May", Peter has uncovered a lab, within it is a stasis tank containing an exact physical symbiote duplicate of Mayday Parker, with notes left behind by Norman Osborn suggesting she is the real Mayday, and not a clone. When protecting his nephew Normie from an exploding test tube, Peter is affected by the serum within much like Osborn was...and begins to develop erratic behavior. He ultimately overcomes an attempt by Norman Osborn to control his mind and defeats him with the aid of his daughter, her clone, and the spirit of his Aunt May.
Enhanced Durability: Woven with durable fabric, Spider-Man's new suit is highly tear resistant, as seen when it received no damage after being dragged along the streets after a van, withstood the strain of Spider-Man holding the Staten Island Ferry together, and when it was unscathed by shards of shattered glass during the Rescue at the Washington Monument. In addition, the suit is waterproof, as showcased when the suit and its technological capabilities were unaffected despite being submerged in water.
I actually do think The Incredibles explored this issue in a subtle way; the fact that the basis of Syndrome’s psychosis is that he was fixated on one element of the superhero making a person a “super” - special powers or abilities. That was evidenced in his plot to destory the ideas of “supers” by making everyone “super” eventually; as if giving everyone special powers is all it would take to eliminate the idea of heroes.
^ The Chameleon is the first member of Spider-Man's rogues gallery in publication date. (Excluding the Burglar).[9] He is also well known to be related to Kraven the Hunter and Kraven to him. That revealed relationship helped evolve him as a major villain compared to his original depiction of being just a solo villain in the original issue of The Amazing Spider-Man.[139][140][141]
One day, Peter was at a science exhibit witnessing a scientist attempting to harness the power of radioactivity. Suddenly, a tiny spider fell, unseen by all, into the beam of radiation. Soon, that spider bit Peter on his hand. Dazed and woozy, Peter fled the room and accidentally ran into the path of an incoming car. Warned by a tingle in the back of his head, he quickly dodged the car. Somehow, he stuck to the wall he landed on. Crawling up the wall he grabbed and accidentally crushed a steel pipe. Then he started walking on a power line, with ease. Realizing the spider somehow its power to him, he began to wonder what to do with his new abilities. Soon after, Peter was walking down the street when he noticed a poster of a wrestling challenge. Thinking that this was another way to test his powers, he eagerly, ran home. After easily defeating his opponent, Crusher Hogan, a television promoter offered Peter (Peter was wearing a makeshift costume to protect his identity) a TV show.

When Marvel wanted to issue a story dealing with the immediate aftermath of the September 11 attacks, the company chose the December 2001 issue of The Amazing Spider-Man.[165] In 2006, Spider-Man garnered major media coverage with the revelation of the character's secret identity,[166] an event detailed in a full page story in the New York Post before the issue containing the story was even released.[167]
The sonar lenses in the first sequel remain the only attempt to add somewhat white lenses to the standard cowl in the live-action movies. A very similar sonar lenses idea was used at the end of Batman Forever, although with a very different look to the lenses. The sonar batsuit worn by Val Kilmer was also used to screentest actors like Cillian Murphy for the first movie. Ben Affleck's power armor in Batman v Superman also had glowing whiteish-blue lcd light eyes.
Jump up ^ DeFalco "1960s" in Gilbert (2008), p. 93: "Dr. Octopus shared many traits with Peter Parker. They were both shy, both interested in science, and both had trouble relating to women...Otto Octavius even looked like a grown-up Peter Parker. Lee and Ditko intended Otto to be the man Peter might have become if he hadn't been raised with a sense of responsibility.
Halloween costumes are costumes worn on or around Halloween, a festival which falls on October 31. An early reference to wearing costumes at Halloween comes from Scotland in 1585, but they may pre-date this. There are many references to the custom during the 18th and 19th centuries in the Celtic countries of Scotland, Ireland, Mann and Wales. It has been suggested that the custom comes from the Celtic festivals of Samhain and Calan Gaeaf, or from the practise of "souling" during the Christian observance of Allhallowtide. Wearing costumes and mumming has long been associated with festivals at other times of the year, such as on Christmas.[1] Halloween costumes are traditionally based on frightening supernatural or folkloric beings. However, by the 1930s costumes based on characters in mass media such as film, literature, and radio were popular. Halloween costumes have tended to be worn mainly by young people, but since the mid-20th century they have been increasingly worn by adults also.
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