Jump up ^ Kaplan, Arie (2008). From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books. The Jewish Publication Society. p. 120. ISBN 978-0827608436. In Uncanny X-Men #129 cover-dated Jan. 1979 and on sale in late 1978, writer Chris Claremont and the artist John Byrne created Katherine "Kitty" Pryde, aka Shadowcat, a young Jewish girl who possess the mutant ability to walk through walls.


Author and Ditko scholar Blake Bell writes that it was Ditko who noted the similarities to the Fly. Ditko recalled that "Stan called Jack about the Fly", adding that "[d]ays later, Stan told me I would be penciling the story panel breakdowns from Stan's synopsis". It was at this point that the nature of the strip changed. "Out went the magic ring, adult Spider-Man and whatever legend ideas that Spider-Man story would have contained". Lee gave Ditko the premise of a teenager bitten by a spider and developing powers, a premise Ditko would expand upon to the point he became what Bell describes as "the first work for hire artist of his generation to create and control the narrative arc of his series". On the issue of the initial creation, Ditko states, "I still don't know whose idea was Spider-Man".[26] Kirby noted in a 1971 interview that it was Ditko who "got Spider-Man to roll, and the thing caught on because of what he did".[27] Lee, while claiming credit for the initial idea, has acknowledged Ditko's role, stating, "If Steve wants to be called co-creator, I think he deserves [it]".[28] He has further commented that Ditko's costume design was key to the character's success; since the costume completely covers Spider-Man's body, people of all races could visualize themselves inside the costume and thus more easily identify with the character.[17]


Jump up ^ Diehl, Daniel; Donnelly, Mark P. (13 April 2011). Medieval Celebrations: Your Guide to Planning and Hosting Spectacular Feasts, Parties, Weddings, and Renaissance Fairs. Stackpole Books. p. 17. ISBN 9780811744300. All Hallows' Eve. A time of spiritual unrest, when the souls of the dead, along with ghosts and evil spirits, were believed to walk the land. Church bells were run and fires lit to guide these souls on their way and deflect them from haunting honest Christian folk. Barns and homes were blessed to protect people and livestock from the effects of witches, who were believed to accompany the malignant spirits as they traveld the earth. Although a rare few continued to divine the future, cast spells, and tell ghost stories in rural communities, woe to anyone who was denounced to the church for engaging in such activities. These may seem like innocent fun today, but it was deadly serious stuff during the Middle Ages.
Captain Universe generally possesses superhuman strength, flight, Uni-Vision (microscopic vision, X-ray vision, and telescopic vision), telekinesis, enhanced senses, and a psychic awareness of imminent danger; when a person already possessing one or more of these abilities was transformed into Captain Universe, those abilities were amplified by vast amounts. Some manifestations of the Uni-Power have demonstrated other, less common abilities as well as failing to exhibit some of the more 'usual' powers, which vary in intensity with each wielder according to the strength and imagination of each. Captain Universe usually possesses the ability of molecular rearrangement of organic and inorganic matter, transmutation of elements, the ability to fire bursts of energy and concussive force, and hypnosis (using the Uni-Vision energy). Possessing its own sentience, the Uni-Power can and will abandon a host if necessary, or if said host uses or intends to use the granted abilities in a detrimental or criminal fashion.
There are several games traditionally associated with Halloween. Some of these games originated as divination rituals or ways of foretelling one's future, especially regarding death, marriage and children. During the Middle Ages, these rituals were done by a "rare few" in rural communities as they were considered to be "deadly serious" practices.[163] In recent centuries, these divination games have been "a common feature of the household festivities" in Ireland and Britain.[57] They often involve apples and hazelnuts. In Celtic mythology, apples were strongly associated with the Otherworld and immortality, while hazelnuts were associated with divine wisdom.[164] Some also suggest that they derive from Roman practices in celebration of Pomona.[84]
‘We hebben inmiddels vijf jaar op rij het topniveau behaald in de Champions League van de internationale klantenservices’, kon Cindy Kroon (vice president Customers & Solutions regio NL/UK bij Nuon/Vattenfall) een tijdje terug wel van de daken schreeuwen na het binnenslepen van het COPC CX 6.0-certificaat. ‘En toch blijft dit voor ons iets heel bijzonders.’ Achterover leunen is er dan ook niet bij voor de energiespeler: samen met Bernard Steenbergen (director Customer Service Operations) daagt Kroon de organisatie continu uit dit niveau vast te houden. Minimaal.
When he arrived most of the remaining heroes had been murdered by either Set's fearsome power or at the hands of his seven mind controlled brides. Quasar found The Silver Surfer attempting to keep the creature at bay. Filled with an immeasurable amount of rage the Quasar/Captain Universe entity summoned the Eye of Agamotto and pulled himself and Set into the Eye's pocket dimension where they would do battle for all Eternity. Later on Quasar of Earth-616 viewed his counterpart facing Set.

Jump up ^ Monaghan, Patricia (1 January 2009). The Encyclopedia of Celtic Mythology and Folklore. Infobase Publishing. p. 167. ISBN 9781438110370. Archived from the original on 23 April 2016. Retrieved 19 October 2015. They were both respected and feared. "Their backs towards us, their faces away from us, and may God and Mary save us from harm," was a prayer spoken whenever one ventured near their dwellings.


Gabriel : Gwen's son by Norman Osborn. Norman convinced Gabriel and his sister, Sarah, that Peter Parker was their father and had killed their mother. Although Sarah is persuaded otherwise, Gabriel continues to believe so and takes on the identity of the "Gray" Goblin. After a confrontation with Spider-Man, he crashed into the river on his glider and lost his memories. Sarah took him to their home in France to recover. After failing to convince Sarah to join him, he flies off on a different glider. Introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man #509.
Costumes are popularly employed at sporting events, during which fans dress as their team's representative mascot to show their support. Businesses use mascot costumes to bring in people to their business either by placing their mascot in the street by their business or sending their mascot out to sporting events, festivals, national celebrations, fairs, and parades. Mascots appear at organizations wanting to raise awareness of their work. Children's Book authors create mascots from the main character to present at their book signings. Animal costumes that are visually very similar to mascot costumes are also popular among the members of the furry fandom, where the costumes are referred to as fursuits and match one's animal persona, or "fursona".
When fighting Electro, Spidey had to modify his costume to defeat his foe. He once made a costume from a rubber air mattress that made victory over Electro possible. On another occasion, when Electro's powers were amplified, Spider-Man used an improved version of the insulated costume that was resistant to Electro's attacks. With the help of X-Man, Spider-Man once again defeated Electro.
Arcade Beetle Abner Jenkins Leila Davis Janice Lincoln Big Wheel Black Tarantula Boomerang Bullseye Calypso Carrion Clash Cyclone Demogoblin Doctor Doom Doppleganger Dracula Foreigner Gibbon Gog Grey Goblin Grim Hunter Grizzly Hippo Human Fly Hypno-Hustler Jack O' Lantern Jason Macendale Jigsaw Juggernaut Kangaroo Living Brain Lobo Brothers Looter Man-Wolf Kraven the Hunter (Ana Kravinoff) Kraven the Hunter (Alyosha Kravinoff) Lady Octopus Leap-Frog Magneto Man-Bull Massacre Mephisto Menace Mister Hyde Molten Man Morlun Nightmare Overdrive Owl Red Skull Ringer Scarecrow Scorcher Scorpia Scream Screwball Shathra Shriek Sin-Eater Speed Demon Spider Queen Spot Stegron Stilt-Man Styx and Stone Swarm Tarantula Taskmaster Trapster Phil Urich Vermin Walrus White Rabbit Will o' the Wisp
The Iron Spider armor also has a secret override that can be activated by Iron Man in case of emergencies or if Spider-Man ever switches sides (which he does in Civil War #5). However, unknown to Stark, Peter was already aware of the safety measure and had bypassed it with his own override, Password Surprise. Perhaps most sinister, Stark discovered a way to give his own Iron Man armor a "spider-sense" based on Peter's, and the ability to give Spider-Man's sense red herrings.
Long before Bruce Wayne became Batman, Thomas Wayne wore a "batsuit" to a costume ball. The costume consisted of a domino mask and a cape cut in a manner suggesting wings. According to some stories, Thomas foiled a crime while wearing the suit. Batman kept it in a glass case similar to the suits of his fallen partners. Dr. Hurt has since taken it and worn it as his own, as he claims to be Bruce's father. It was assumed lost when Dr. Hurt plunged into the Gotham Bay, but he has since resurfaced wearing it.
Jump up ^ Carter, Albert Howard; Petro, Jane Arbuckle (1998). Rising from the Flames: The Experience of the Severely Burned. University of Pennsylvania Press. p. 100. ISBN 9780812215175. Halloween, incorporated into the Christian year as the eve of All Saints Day, marked the return of the souls of the departed and the release of devils who could move freely on that night. Fires lit on that night served to prevent the influence of such spirits and to provide omens for the future. Modern children go from house to house at Halloween with flashlights powered by electric batteries, while jack o'lanterns (perhaps with an actual candle, but often with a lught bulb) glow from windows and porches.
Jump up ^ Monaghan, Patricia (1 January 2009). The Encyclopedia of Celtic Mythology and Folklore. Infobase Publishing. p. 167. ISBN 9781438110370. Archived from the original on 23 April 2016. Retrieved 19 October 2015. They were both respected and feared. "Their backs towards us, their faces away from us, and may God and Mary save us from harm," was a prayer spoken whenever one ventured near their dwellings.
When Marvel approached Hasbro about the prospect of including Spider-Man in the third issue of the Generation 1 comic book, they initially turned the idea down, since Spider-Man was currently licensed to rival toy company Mattel for the Secret Wars toyline. Marvel convinced them to permit the appearance by putting Spidey in his black costume, whereas the Secret Wars toy was clad in his traditional red and blue, and therefore wouldn't be "advertised" by the comic.[4] This meant adding a footnote to the story explaining that it took place prior to the recent issue of Spidey's own title in which he ditched the black threads upon finding out they were a symbiote.
In subsequent decades, popular characters like Dazzler, She-Hulk, Elektra, Catwoman, Witchblade, Spider-Girl, Batgirl and the Birds of Prey became stars of long-running eponymous titles. Female characters began assuming leadership roles in many ensemble superhero teams; the Uncanny X-Men series and its related spin-off titles in particular have included many female characters in pivotal roles since the 1970s.[33] Volume 4 of the X-Men comic book series featured an all-female team as part of the Marvel NOW! branding initiative in 2013.[34] Superpowered female characters like Buffy the Vampire Slayer[35] and Darna[36][37] have a tremendous influence on popular culture in their respective countries of origin.

^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 36. ISBN 978-0756692360. Now it was time for [John Romita, Sr.] to introduce a new Spidey villain with the help of [Stan] Lee. Out of their pooled creative energies was born the Rhino, a monstrous behemoth trapped in a durable rhinoceros suit.
^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 59. ISBN 978-0756692360. In the first issue of The Amazing Spider-Man to be written by someone other than Stan Lee...Thomas also managed to introduce a major new player to Spidey's life – the scientifically created vampire known as Morbius.
These are not mere mortals but they are blessed with divine gifts. They were often agents of change bringing culture, social change or advancement to a civilization. Their stories were more than just historical lessons - there was an element of religion and cult worship. I would argue that they are part of the archetype of the superhero - even if they are foreign to our current definition.
[32] Researchers conducted a survey for the National Retail Federation in the United States and found that 53.3 percent of consumers planned to buy a costume for Halloween 2005, spending $38.11 on average (up $10 from the year before). They were also expected to spend $4.96 billion in 2006, up significantly from just $3.3 billion the previous year.[33] The troubled economy has caused many Americans to cut back on Halloween spending. In 2009, the National Retail Federation anticipated that American households would decrease Halloween spending by as much as 15% to $56.31.[34] In 2013, Americans spent an estimated $6.9 billion to celebrate Halloween, including a predicted $2.6 billion on costumes (with more spent on adult costumes than for children's costumes) and $330 million on pet costumes.[35][36] In 2017 it was estimated that Americans would spend $9.1 billion on Halloween merchandise with $3.4 billion of that being on spend on Halloween costumes.[37]
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