Parker appears in numerous What If? universes. Among these are realities in which he is a member of the Fantastic Four; in which he was not bitten by the spider but some other supporting cast member was; in which he chose not to go into superheroics; in which he joins with Wolverine and takes up black ops work; and in which he becomes a mutated spider creature.
This version of Spider-Man appeared in a 4 issue miniseries (Feb-May 2009). He exists in the Great Depression Era of New York in the 1930s. Aunt May is a speaker of equality and spends time standing on a soap box shouting her beliefs. Uncle Ben was killed by a crime syndicate run by Norman Osborn, aka The Goblin. Shortly afterward, Peter is bitten by a strange spider and endowed with mystical spider-powers. Though he has a wall-crawling ability, he has increased agility, strength, a form of spider-sense, and can spray nets of webbing from his hand. He then dons a black mask, gloves, and a trenchcoat and sets out to stop Norman and his gang!

During her career, she had a role in the rebirth of two of Spider-Man's old foes during the Rose's efforts to gain extra muscle: she was the one who threw the switch of the electric chair which gave Electro his powers back, and helped set up the theft of Doctor Octopus' corpse for re-animation from the Hand. She also appears in Loners as an assassin smuggling MGH.[113][114][115][116]
While the previous game featured a straightforward, traditional turn-based combat system akin to most fantasy role-playing games, this game has a new grid-based combat system that remains turn-based but is much more refined. The player can now move their characters every turn, as well as build larger parties of allies that can be in play at once, against larger groups of opponents. This system encourages strategy from player and opponent alike, as attacks now knock back, or even forward, characters, which can make them more or less susceptible to certain attacks. Movement on the grid opens up some attacks and closes others.
The sonar lenses in the first sequel remain the only attempt to add somewhat white lenses to the standard cowl in the live-action movies. A very similar sonar lenses idea was used at the end of Batman Forever, although with a very different look to the lenses. The sonar batsuit worn by Val Kilmer was also used to screentest actors like Cillian Murphy for the first movie. Ben Affleck's power armor in Batman v Superman also had glowing whiteish-blue lcd light eyes.
If you're a gym rat and you've got the six pack to show it, then we ALL know there's only one costume for you—a Greek Spartan warrior! You could be just like King Leonidas in The 300 and vanquish your opponents on the battlefield...or even defeat them on the dance floor if you know a move or two. And it won't matter if you're looking for admiration from goddesses, kings and queens, or your fellow warriors. Because when you're dressed in this costume, you're not going to be leaving a whole lot to the imagination!

George Stacy (deceased): Gwen Stacy's father, Police Captain. Introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man (vol. 1) #56 (1968). He approves of Peter and Gwen's relationship as boyfriend and girlfriend. During a fight between Spider-Man and Doctor Octopus, he is crushed by falling debris while saving a child. As he dies, he reveals to Peter that he had known his identity for some time (something Peter had suspected anyway), and asks Peter to take care of Gwen.
Jump up ^ Saffel, p. 65, states, "In the battle that followed atop the Brooklyn Bridge (or was it the George Washington Bridge?)...." On page 66, Saffel reprints the panel of The Amazing Spider-Man #121, page 18, in which Spider-Man exclaims, "The George Washington Bridge! It figures Osborn would pick something named after his favorite president. He's got the same sort of hangup for dollar bills!" Saffel states, "The span portrayed...is the GW's more famous cousin, the Brooklyn Bridge. ... To address the contradiction in future reprints of the tale, though, Spider-Man's dialogue was altered so that he's referring to the Brooklyn Bridge. But the original snafu remains as one of the more visible errors in the history of comics."

The yearly New York Halloween Parade, begun in 1974 by puppeteer and mask maker Ralph Lee of Greenwich Village, is a large Halloween parade and one of America's only major nighttime parades (along with Portland's Starlight Parade), attracting more than 60,000 costumed participants, two million spectators, and a worldwide television audience of over 100 million.[157] The largest Halloween parade in the world takes place in Derry in Northern Ireland, which was named the "best Halloween destination in the world" having been voted number one in a USA Today readers' poll in 2015.[158]


Het kolossale glazen gebouw is vanaf Amsterdam Sloterdijk nauwelijks te missen. In de interactieve aankomsthal waar een fors touch-beeldscherm de ruimte vult en waar klanten het KPN Experience Lab kunnen betreden, worden we opgewacht door Jorn Vriend (product owner MijnKPN). Het telecombedrijf lanceerde in mei een vernieuwde Mijn-omgeving. De pilot had een ‘op maat gemaakt selfservicekanaal’ als doel. Voldoende aanleiding dus om dit keer niet de klantenserviceafdeling, maar het technologische hart van KPN een bezoek te brengen. Vol enthousiasme en bevlogenheid leidt hij ons rond over de afdeling, waar we een voetbalveld, een Playstation en surfborden aantreffen.


In France, some Christian families, on the night of All Hallows' Eve, prayed beside the graves of their loved ones, setting down dishes full of milk for them.[100] On Halloween, in Italy, some families left a large meal out for ghosts of their passed relatives, before they departed for church services.[112] In Spain, on this night, special pastries are baked, known as "bones of the holy" (Spanish: Huesos de Santo) and put them on the graves of the churchyard, a practice that continues to this day.[113]
With the release of the Spider-Man films, the Spider-Man video games followed suit. Spider-Man: The Game was released in unison with the film in 2002. It was released on the PlayStation 2, the Nintendo GameCube, the Gameboy Advance, the Xbox and the PC. The game broke many sales records at the time. When Spider-Man 2 was released in June 2004, Spider-Man 2: The Game was released the day before. The game saw release on the same consoles as Spider-Man: The Game did, in addition to the Nintendo DS and Sony PSP. 2005 saw a comic related Spider-Man game hit the market; Ultimate Spider-Man followed many of the comic story arcs, and allowed the player to switch between Spider-Man and Venom. Spider-Man, voiced by Quinton Flynn, appears as one of the main characters in Marvel: Ultimate Alliance and he has special conversations with Mysterio, Lizard and Scorpion, and Dark Spider-Man. His simulator disk has him saving Dum Dum Dugan from the Scorpion and A.I.M in the Omega Base. His costumes are his classic, symbiote, Scarlet Spider and Stark Armor costumes. Spider-Man's latest film, Spider-Man 3 also saw the same video game treatment as its prequels. Spider-Man 3 was released on more consoles than any game before it. The game was available for the Xbox 360, PlayStation 2 and 3, Nintendo Wii , Gameboy Advance, Nintendo DS, the Sony PSP and PC. Spider-Man: Friend or Foe was released in October 2007 for Xbox 360, Wii, Playstation 2 , PC, PSP and Nintendo DS. This Spider-Man game features the villains from the Spider-Man films, but with a humorous twist.
After returning from Berlin, Stark allowed Parker to keep the suit, although he advised the young hero not do anything he would or would not do and to remain on the ground, a tip which Parker accepted. Parker then asked when the next mission was, and Stark replied that if they needed him then someone would contact him, and appointed Happy Hogan to be their liaison.[2]
That storyline came at the behest of editor-in-chief Joe Quesada, who said, "Peter being single is an intrinsic part of the very foundation of the world of Spider-Man".[73] It caused unusual public friction between Quesada and writer J. Michael Straczynski, who "told Joe that I was going to take my name off the last two issues of the [story] arc" but was talked out of doing so.[75] At issue with Straczynski's climax to the arc, Quesada said, was

I’d venture that a “super hero” as opposed to an ordinary hero, is someone who essentially devotes their life to being a hero as their foundation. In this sense, I *would* consider quasi-mythological figures such as Zorro or Robin Hood to be effectively superheroes, though they lack a lot of the stereotypes we’ve come to associate with superheroes. (Or perhaps not… depending on how you look at it.)
In Civil War, Spider-Man is introduced as a young vigilante operating out of Queens. Tony Stark tracks down Peter and recruits him to help stop Captain America's team of fugitive heroes before the situation can escalate any further. During the battle, Spider-Man faces off against the Falcon and the Winter Soldier, but is thwarted by Falcon's Redwing drone. He later fights against Captain America, but is outsmarted and defeated by the veteran hero's superior tactical abilities. Spider-Man plays a major role in taking down Giant-Man, allowing Iron Man and War Machine to finish him off. However, Peter is injured in the process, causing Iron Man to send him back home.

^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 59. ISBN 978-0756692360. In the first issue of The Amazing Spider-Man to be written by someone other than Stan Lee...Thomas also managed to introduce a major new player to Spidey's life – the scientifically created vampire known as Morbius.
The word Halloween or Hallowe'en dates to about 1745[31] and is of Christian origin.[32] The word "Hallowe'en" means "hallowed evening" or "holy evening".[33] It comes from a Scottish term for All Hallows' Eve (the evening before All Hallows' Day).[34] In Scots, the word "eve" is even, and this is contracted to e'en or een. Over time, (All) Hallow(s) E(v)en evolved into Hallowe'en. Although the phrase "All Hallows'" is found in Old English "All Hallows' Eve" is itself not seen until 1556.[34][35]
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