Lesley Bannatyne and Cindy Ott both write that Anglican colonists in the Southern United States and Catholic colonists in Maryland "recognized All Hallow's Eve in their church calendars",[114][115] although the Puritans of New England maintained strong opposition to the holiday, along with other traditional celebrations of the established Church, including Christmas.[116] Almanacs of the late 18th and early 19th century give no indication that Halloween was widely celebrated in North America.[117] It was not until mass Irish and Scottish immigration in the 19th century that Halloween became a major holiday in North America.[117] Confined to the immigrant communities during the mid-19th century, it was gradually assimilated into mainstream society and by the first decade of the 20th century it was being celebrated coast to coast by people of all social, racial and religious backgrounds.[118] "In Cajun areas, a nocturnal Mass was said in cemeteries on Halloween night. Candles that had been blessed were placed on graves, and families sometimes spent the entire night at the graveside".[119]

And there’s (at least) one more angle to this as well…where did the idea of the superhero come from? As Meg suggested to me at dinner last night, was there a cultural need for a superhero during a super-crisis like the Great Depression? Or did the idea evolve gradually from regular heros (cowboys, space cowboys, etc.) to heros who were magicians (with special powers…it’s not that much of a stretch to imagine a magician possessing supernatural powers) to classic superheroes like Superman?


After graduating from High School, Peter Parker enrolled at ESU ( Empire State University) where Flash introduced him to Harry Osborn and Gwen Stacy. During this time, Aunt May suffered from a serious heart attack. Peter would constantly blow his friends off and they saw this as an insult. Eventually their relationship would get better as Peter became more involved with his peers. He and Harry became best friends and roommates. Peter also started dating Gwen Stacy. He would also meet Anna Watson's niece Mary Jane. Although he was attracted to Mary Jane, Peter decided to settle with Gwen because MJ was too much of a "party girl" for him. Peter loves Gwen, but their relationship was strained a bit by him constantly leaving to fight crime. Their relationship was saved by Gwen's father, Police Captain George Stacy, an ally of Spider-Man, who approved of Peter dating his daughter. Gwen's father was later killed during a battle between Spider-Man and Doctor Octopus, after he was crushed by falling debris while saving a child. In his dying breath, George called Spider-Man "Peter", revealing that he had always known about his dual identity and urged him to take care of Gwen. George's death caused a strain in the couple's relationship because Gwen blamed Spider-Man for her loss. She left Peter for some time to live with her uncle in London.
It's been three weeks since spider-man foiled Doc Ock's plan and now Peter is invited to MJ's, which is Mary Jane's Club, but he is still under the weather because he was not able to prevent Silver Sables death, but while Peter is "having fun" at the party Carlie calls and tells Spider-man to come meet her at the cemetery. Spider-Man arrives and Carlie tells him that the grounds keeper saw a pale man digging the grave of Billie Connors with his bare hands and then vanishing into the dark with the body. Spider-Man instantly realized that this pale powerful man was Morbius and he goes to face him at Horizon labs. Spider-Man, disgusted by Morbius' actions, starts to attack him, but eventually stops when Michael explains that the reason he dug up the grave was to find a cure for the Lizard, and he tells Peter that he has already accomplished his goal. Spider-Man, hearing this, plans an attack on the Lizard and the confronts him in the sewers and fights him for a long period for time, but finaly Morbius and Spider-Man stab the Lizard with enough hypodermic harpoons for Max to bring Connor's back. But the Lizard is still in control, even in Kurt's body. The Lizard awakens Morbius' violent vampire side, with the smell of blood. And while Spider-Man was distracted with Morbius, Connors created the new serum that will turn him into the Lizard again, but this serums turns everyone into lizards except Connors himself, so while testing this serum Connors turns the entire Horizon Labs crew into Lizards. When he finally created the serum for himself, it turned him into a new version of the Lizard. When Spider-Man comes after capturing Morbius, Carlie tells him what has happened. Spidey creates a new cure and a battle ensures between Spider-Man and the Lizard. When Spider-Man stabs the Lizard with a harpoon filled with the cure, nothing happens, the cure doesn't work. Only at the end we see that the cure has actually worked and now Connors' mind is secretly in control of the Lizard's body.
Reaction to Spider-Man's rogues gallery has been overwhelmingly positive with many journalists citing it as one of the greatest comic book rogues galleries of all time,[133][134][135] with Batman's rogues gallery being its most rivaled contender.[136][137] Although editors such as The Hollywood Reporter's Graeme McMillan felt that only Flash's rogues gallery can compete with Spider-Man's rogues.[134] Kyle Schmidlin of What Culture! described the superhero's rogues gallery as "one of the most colorful in comics" explaining that Batman could only be debated as having a great number of enemies as good as Spider-Man.[138] IGN staff editors, Joshua Yehl and Jesse Schedeen, described the Spider-Man villains as "one of the most iconic and well-balanced in comics". They opined that the scope of their schemes, how cool their powers are, and how dramatically they have affected Spider-Man's life is what makes the Spider-Man villains so great.[1] Newsarama ranked Spider-Man's rogues gallery as number one out ten as the greatest rogues gallery of all time.[137]
While in an ESU laboratory, Peter invented a white & blue suit that was made of steel plates that were from a pseudo-metallic composition using a modified webbing formula. He used this costume during the "My enemy's enemy" story where he fought Blood Rose, Gauntlet and the heavily armed New Enforcers. The costume was destroyed by acid during the battle and was never rebuilt. Despite providing Spider-Man with increased durability and strength, it slowed down his movements.
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Gamers spend so much time immersed in the joy of entering another world that Halloween is a wonderful chance to take that love of gaming offline. Your son can take his pick of anything from World of Warcraft costumes to Halo, Donkey Kong and Five Nights at Freddy’s. Defend your homeland when dressing in an awesome Overwatch costume. Going trick-or-treating as Mercy, D.Va, Reaper, or even Solider: 76 will have you more than ready to become the world’s newest hero. Whether he’s dressing up on his own or joining his friends in group costumes for trick or treating, these boys gaming costumes are a wonderful way for him to show off his gamer favorites for Halloween 2018.
While I don’t know explicitly where the idea comes from, it seems to me that there are a few interesting threads that could be looked at. First, many of the original superhero creators were immigrants or children of immigrants — Americans but not quite like other Americans. Much has been made of the “Jewishness” of Superman — an immigrant from an Old World whose geeky, mild-mannered, weakling exterior hides his inner superiority to everyone around him, who even chose an American name to hide his secret foreign-sounding one. A second thread is the rise of teen culture in the US, and the development of the gender gap as the necessity for greater and greater independence became a factor in child-rearing. FInally, I think it bears looking at the problems of urban living which, at the beginning of the 20th century, had become the main environment for most Americans. Especially important in this connection is the anonymity afforded by urban living and the alientation — call it the Walter Mitty effect — leading people to desperately wish for a way to prove themselves worthy and *noticable*.
^ Jump up to: a b c "BBC – Religions – Christianity: All Hallows' Eve". British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). 2010. Archived from the original on 3 November 2011. Retrieved 1 November 2011. It is widely believed that many Hallowe'en traditions have evolved from an ancient Celtic festival called Samhain which was Christianised by the early Church.... All Hallows' Eve falls on 31st October each year, and is the day before All Hallows' Day, also known as All Saints' Day in the Christian calendar. The Church traditionally held a vigil on All Hallows' Eve when worshippers would prepare themselves with prayers and fasting prior to the feast day itself. The name derives from the Old English 'hallowed' meaning holy or sanctified and is now usually contracted to the more familiar word Hallowe'en. ...However, there are supporters of the view that Hallowe'en, as the eve of All Saints' Day, originated entirely independently of Samhain ...
The culmination of nearly every superhero that came before him, Spider-Man is the hero of heroes. He's got fun and cool powers, but not on the god-like level of Thor. He's just a normal guy with girlfriend problems and money issues, so he’s more relatable than playboy billionaire Iron Man. And he's an awkward teenager, not a wizened adult like Captain America. Not too hot and not too cold, Spider-Man is just right.

Detective Terri Lee (appeared in Spider-Man): She is a detective for the New York Police Department. Naturally, she investigates cases that involve Spider-Man and to an extent to Peter Parker, though she never found out Peter and Spider-Man are the same person. She didn't trust Spider-Man at first, but overtime she began accepting Spider-Man as an ally. She has ties to Carnage and she had a relationship with the vampire hunter Blade.
While brooding in his study over how to be a more effective crime fighter, Bruce Wayne saw a bat come through his window (in the earliest Detective Comics portrayal simply flying in an open window, in Post-Crisis continuity such as Batman: Year One, dramatically crashing through the glass) and perch on the bust of his father. Realizing that "criminals are a superstitious, cowardly lot," Bruce adopts the persona of a bat in order to conceal his identity and strike fear into his adversaries. Subsequent origin tales have had Bruce terrified by bats as a child, and observing a bat costume worn by his father at a costume ball, but the primary impetus of his decision to adopt the bat persona has always been the incident of the bat coming in the window of his study. It is as a result of this incident that the batsuit was developed.

Spider-Man is a fictional superhero created by writer-editor Stan Lee and writer-artist Steve Ditko. He first appeared in the anthology comic book Amazing Fantasy #15 (August 1962) in the Silver Age of Comic Books. He appears in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, as well as in a number of movies, television shows, and video game adaptations set in the Marvel Universe. In the stories, Spider-Man is the alias of Peter Parker, an orphan raised by his Aunt May and Uncle Ben in New York City after his parents Richard and Mary Parker were killed in a plane crash. Lee and Ditko had the character deal with the struggles of adolescence and financial issues, and accompanied him with many supporting characters, such as J. Jonah Jameson, Flash Thompson, Harry Osborn, romantic interests Gwen Stacy and Mary Jane Watson, and foes such as Doctor Octopus, Green Goblin and Venom. His origin story has him acquiring spider-related abilities after a bite from a radioactive spider; these include clinging to surfaces, shooting spider-webs from wrist-mounted devices, and detecting danger with his "spider-sense".
I’d venture that a “super hero” as opposed to an ordinary hero, is someone who essentially devotes their life to being a hero as their foundation. In this sense, I *would* consider quasi-mythological figures such as Zorro or Robin Hood to be effectively superheroes, though they lack a lot of the stereotypes we’ve come to associate with superheroes. (Or perhaps not… depending on how you look at it.)
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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