The Toei Company had made a television series based on Marvel's famous hero as a tokusatsu in Japan. Even though the powers and costume are the same; the man behind the mask was a young motorcycle rider named Takuya Yamashiro who instead of getting bitten by a radioactive spider follows his archaeologist father and discovers a UFO called "Marveller" from the planet "Spider". When his father was killed exploring the ship, Takuya meets the lone survivor from Spider. It gives him a bracelet that not only grants him the same costume and the same powers as the American version but it also allows him to summon a giant robot (which looks an awful lot like a Power Ranger zord) to fight the evil of Professor Monster and his monstrous minions. The series lasted 41 episodes and is available in streaming video on Marvel's website.
Arthur Stacy: Gwen Stacy's uncle, a private investigator, first appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man (vol. 1) #93 and #95. He was reintroduced only in the 1990s, in Peter Parker: Spider-Man #70 (in the last part of 'Clone Saga'). He is George's younger brother, but was originally presented in the 1970s as the older brother. For a time, Spider-Man would call on Stacy's skills as an investigator.
Boy's Costumes are proportioned for the appropriate age, from toddler all the way to teenager. Some of our costumes are in a jumpsuit style, which has the legs, torso and arms all attached in one piece. Others costumes have multiple pieces, such as shirt, jacket, pants, and more. These separate pieces give the wearer more freedom of movement, and offer a realistic look due to a layered effect. Our costumes for boys are great for trick or treating, but don't forget that they are also useful long after for purposes of make believe and healthy personal growth. 
^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 25. ISBN 978-0756692360. The Amazing Spider-Man #13 saw [Stan] Lee and [Steve] Ditko return to the creation of new super villains. This issue marked the debut of Mysterio, a former special effects expert named Quentin Beck.
The array of devices Batman carries have become more complex over time. The simple coiled rope and Batarang scaling equipment became a rocket-powered (or compressed air powered) grapple gun. The suit has also carried on different occasions a re-breather device, flash and gas grenades, explosives and a detonator, lockpicks, a signaling device for the Batmobile, electronic surveillance equipment (including video camera and monitor), a forensic kit for gathering crime scene evidence, a medical kit, a cache of money and, in early incarnations, a pistol in a holster. On any occasion where Batman anticipates encountering Kryptonians, he has also carried (in a lead case) a Kryptonite Ring, given to him by Superman as a weapon of last resort.

Follow Spider-Man’s action-packed journey, from his struggle to harness the extraordinary gifts that will prove to be both blessing and curse, to his fight to save innocent lives while the media tears him to pieces. It all leads up to his ultimate battle high above New York streets, against the death-dealing madman known as the Green Goblin. While the city watches helplessly and countless lives hang in the balance, Spider-Man confronts his archnemesis, and the Goblin puts Spider-Man’s vow to fight crime to the ultimate test...
Halloween costumes are costumes worn on or around Halloween, a festival which falls on October 31. An early reference to wearing costumes at Halloween comes from Scotland in 1585, but they may pre-date this. There are many references to the custom during the 18th and 19th centuries in the Celtic countries of Scotland, Ireland, Mann and Wales. It has been suggested that the custom comes from the Celtic festivals of Samhain and Calan Gaeaf, or from the practise of "souling" during the Christian observance of Allhallowtide. Wearing costumes and mumming has long been associated with festivals at other times of the year, such as on Christmas.[1] Halloween costumes are traditionally based on frightening supernatural or folkloric beings. However, by the 1930s costumes based on characters in mass media such as film, literature, and radio were popular. Halloween costumes have tended to be worn mainly by young people, but since the mid-20th century they have been increasingly worn by adults also.
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