Responding to the distress call they received earlier from the Asgardian ship, the Guardians of the Galaxy arrive only to discover that they are too late to stop Thanos, but are in time to save Thor who they find floating around in the ship's debris. After confirming with Thor about his altercation with Thanos, the heroes realize that if Thanos' goal is to assemble the Infinity Stones then he will eventually head to Knowhere in order to retrieve the Reality Stone which is currently in the Collector's possession. To stop Thanos from acquiring the Reality Stone; Thor, Rocket and Groot leave for Nidavellir to find the dwarf blacksmith Eitri, so that he might create a battle-axe capable of killing Thanos while Star-Lord, Gamora, Drax and Mantis go to Knowhere to protect the Reality Stone from Thanos till the others return with the axe. Unfortunately, by the time the guardians arrive at Knowhere, Thanos has already retrieved the Reality Stone from the Collector. The guardians try to take the stone back from Thanos, but are quickly defeated. Knowing that his adoptive daughter Gamora knows where the Soul Stone is, Thanos kidnaps her following his fight with her fellow guardians and trys to coerce her into revealing its location. When Gamora refuses Thanos threatens to torture her captive adoptive sister Nebula as punishment. Not wanting her sister to suffer, Gamora submits to Thanos' demands and reveals that the Soul Stone is located on the planet Vormir. Taking Gamora with him to the planet Vormir, Thanos discovers that the stone is guarded by the Red Skull who reveals that the stone can only be retrieved by someone who is willing to sacrifice someone they love. In response to this, Thanos reluctantly kills Gamora, earning him the stone.
American Upper Midwest, Pacific Northwest, the northern portions of the Great Lakes Basin, and Maine – Due to the cold weather, the garb in rural areas tends to more closely adhere to heavier materials, such as flannel or Buffalo plaid mackinaw jackets, the occasional parka, and trapper hat. A good example is seen in the typical attire of Paul Bunyan, a folk hero popular in areas where logging was a common occupation, as well as lumberjacks working in the area.
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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