One of the first things I did was to work up a costume. A vital, visual part of the character. I had to know how he looked ... before I did any breakdowns. For example: A clinging power so he wouldn't have hard shoes or boots, a hidden wrist-shooter versus a web gun and holster, etc. ... I wasn't sure Stan would like the idea of covering the character's face but I did it because it hid an obviously boyish face. It would also add mystery to the character....[21]
Spider-Man is an unlockable character in the Facebook game Marvel: Avengers Alliance. As an Infiltrator, he gains the Combat Awareness buff after attacking Tacticians. He has tremendous agility and an appropriate repertoire of powers, including: web-based attacks and his Spider Sense. He starts with his traditional red & blue costume, but players can purchase the black costume to fight as an ebony Infiltrator or a nefarious Bruiser. By unlocking Spider-Man players also gain access to the bonus missions in Chapter 3 of the single-player campaign.
Ultimate Spider-Man is a modernized reboot of the Spider-Man story, starting from the very beginning, with a plot that is inspired by, but very different from, the original continuity, and thus is a parallel universe counterpart to the mainstream version of Spider-Man. The main purpose of the series is to be accessible to new and young readers, as it is free from the decades of history of the original, but it has been embraced by many longtime fans as well.

Jump up ^ Woods, Robert (2013). Evangelical Christians and Popular Culture. ABC-CLIO. p. 239. ISBN 9780313386541. Evangelicals have found opportunities with both Christmas and Easter to use Christian candy to re-inject religion into these traditionally Christian holidays and boldly reclaim them as their own. They have increasingly begun to use Halloween, the most candy-centric holiday, as an opportunity for evangelism. Contained in small packages featuring Bible verses, Scripture Candy's "Harvest Seeds"--candy corn in everything but name—are among many candies created for this purpose.
Spider-Man once again featured as a playable fighter in the 2011 release of Marvel vs. Capcom 3: Fate of Two Worlds and its updated release of Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 and versions of the game would be released on the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita and Xbox 360. October 2011 also saw the release of the next Spider-Man video game adventure with Spider-Man: Edge of Time, developed by Activision and Beenox, the latter being given free reign after the success of Shattered Dimensions, which bears a similar gameplay concept. The game involves Peter Parker and his future counterpart Miguel O'Hara. New villain created for the game, Walker Sloan, has created a time machine in order to go back in time and start Alchemex, the company which Miguel works for, now was established in his own views in the seventies. Miguel proceeds to stop him but is caught in the portal after Sloan has entered and somehow becomes a "viewer" in the events. This gives him the ability to communicate with Peter Parker, who now works for Alechemex in this time altered universe, and everything he does directly affects the year 2099. Both briefly navigate their own timelines until circumstances force them to switch, now residing in timelines alien to them they traverse obstacles in order to get home through the temporal portal and solve the dystopian effects of the timeline corruption. The two work together to prevent Peter's death at the hands of Anti-Venom, save Mary Jane from multiple danger, and even take on the CEO of Alchemex. Currently Beenox has been given rights to the creation of all future Spider-Man games.
Jump up ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 24. ISBN 978-0756692360. While never reaching the popularity of previous [Stan] Lee and [Steve] Ditko collaborations, the Enforcers managed to give the wall-crawler a run for his money in their first appearance.
[32] Researchers conducted a survey for the National Retail Federation in the United States and found that 53.3 percent of consumers planned to buy a costume for Halloween 2005, spending $38.11 on average (up $10 from the year before). They were also expected to spend $4.96 billion in 2006, up significantly from just $3.3 billion the previous year.[33] The troubled economy has caused many Americans to cut back on Halloween spending. In 2009, the National Retail Federation anticipated that American households would decrease Halloween spending by as much as 15% to $56.31.[34] In 2013, Americans spent an estimated $6.9 billion to celebrate Halloween, including a predicted $2.6 billion on costumes (with more spent on adult costumes than for children's costumes) and $330 million on pet costumes.[35][36] In 2017 it was estimated that Americans would spend $9.1 billion on Halloween merchandise with $3.4 billion of that being on spend on Halloween costumes.[37]
×