To fight the deranged villain known as Massacre, Peter built himself a dark colored bulletproof armored costume that deflects bullets, and equipped himself with magnetic webbing that can be used to disable the radio frequencies of Massacre's charges. It is also lightweight, but needs to recharge after a certain period of usage. Peter has also incorporated the technology in improving road safety.

While I don’t know explicitly where the idea comes from, it seems to me that there are a few interesting threads that could be looked at. First, many of the original superhero creators were immigrants or children of immigrants — Americans but not quite like other Americans. Much has been made of the “Jewishness” of Superman — an immigrant from an Old World whose geeky, mild-mannered, weakling exterior hides his inner superiority to everyone around him, who even chose an American name to hide his secret foreign-sounding one. A second thread is the rise of teen culture in the US, and the development of the gender gap as the necessity for greater and greater independence became a factor in child-rearing. FInally, I think it bears looking at the problems of urban living which, at the beginning of the 20th century, had become the main environment for most Americans. Especially important in this connection is the anonymity afforded by urban living and the alientation — call it the Walter Mitty effect — leading people to desperately wish for a way to prove themselves worthy and *noticable*.
In Batman: Year One, it is depicted that Batman hid a few pieces of his arsenal in his leather boots, such as a blow gun with fast-acting anesthetic darts and an ultrasonic device built into his left heel. Batman's boots are highly unique. The basic design of the boots are modeled on Tactical boots, but they are made from lightweight rubbers and are much more flexible to allow for full extension when kicking. The boots feature a unique "slingshot" ankle reinforcement design that acts as both the armor and as reinforcement for the ankle joint when kicking or landing from high distances. The bottom is a flexible split sole design and is textured for a variety of surfaces. The boots also have steel toes, making them much more effective when on the offensive. Although Batman is already an accomplished Olympic level swimmer, during the Batman: Hush storyline, it is revealed that he installed underwater propellers on the heels. In Batman Begins, a boot heel is revealed to contain an ultrasonic signaling device capable of calling live bats to it as a form of protection and cover for Batman during a getaway. This device was originally introduced in the Batman: Year One series.
In a Manhattan warehouse, an innocent man has been murdered during a mysterious crime. Evidence points to the involvement of Venom-- the alien symbiote who is obsessed with Spider-Man's destruction. Yet Venom has always safeguarded innocent lives--- has he gone completely around the bend, or is there another suspect?Spider-Man thinks there is more to the crime than meets the eye. The spectre of the Hobgoblin, one of Spider-Man's nastiest villains, falls on a series of thefts, and leads the web-slinger to a deadly secret that may cause New York's destruction. Spider-Man must outsmart two of his most lethal foes to save the city-- but even more danger awaits him!

In addition to the suit's continuous evolution, Batman keeps variant costumes for dealing with extraordinary situations; for example, he has been shown in a Scuba variant of his costume, a fireproof version for fighting his enemy Firefly, a thermally insulated version for fighting Mr. Freeze, as well as others. Many versions of the hero show him swapping his cloth costume for a suit of powered armor.
Christian Bale found the original Batsuit to be very uncomfortable and restrictive, as it was still very much derived from the standard WB batsuits of the past first established by Michael Keaton, with little improvement. The "bat suit wrangler", Day Murch from the 90's films was brought on to assist Bale and stuntmen like Buster Reeves. From Christopher Nolan's point of view, he was dissatisfied with the appearance of the foam rubber cowl, within the fiction it supposed to be made of a solid graphite material. For these reasons, Bruce's desire for a new costume in the movies was put into the story.

[32] Researchers conducted a survey for the National Retail Federation in the United States and found that 53.3 percent of consumers planned to buy a costume for Halloween 2005, spending $38.11 on average (up $10 from the year before). They were also expected to spend $4.96 billion in 2006, up significantly from just $3.3 billion the previous year.[33] The troubled economy has caused many Americans to cut back on Halloween spending. In 2009, the National Retail Federation anticipated that American households would decrease Halloween spending by as much as 15% to $56.31.[34] In 2013, Americans spent an estimated $6.9 billion to celebrate Halloween, including a predicted $2.6 billion on costumes (with more spent on adult costumes than for children's costumes) and $330 million on pet costumes.[35][36] In 2017 it was estimated that Americans would spend $9.1 billion on Halloween merchandise with $3.4 billion of that being on spend on Halloween costumes.[37]
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