When Peter joined The Future Foundation he was given a new costume by Sue Storm. The suit is made of third generation unstable molecules. It has basic default settings however, by concentrating Peter can change the suit's designs and color. Spidey, Ben, Sue, and Reed will work along with other members of The Future Foundation to protect the Marvel Universe from its greatest future threats.

Jump up ^ Lipton, Eric (April 9, 2008). "Official Had Controversial Photos Deleted, Report Says". New York Times. Retrieved 2008-04-09."The staff member who won the “most original costume” prize wore a dreadlock wig, what looked like a prison jumpsuit and black face paint. “I’m a Jamaican detainee from Krome — obviously, I’ve escaped,” the employee, referring to a detention center in Miami, announced to the judges..."

Peter discovers that he is suffering from an unknown disease that is killing him. He seeks the help of the Marvel Universe's best scientists but none of them could help him so he decides to accept the inevitable. He is later attacked by the powerful Morlun, and after a brutal fight, the totem eater rips off Peter's eye, eats it and continues to beat Spider-Man to his apparent death. After his body is sent to the hospital, Morlun attempts to consume him, but after an intervention from Mary Jane, whom Morlun was about to kill, Spider-Man's form suddenly changed. His eyes glow red, his teeth become razor sharp and two poison stingers sprout from his arms. Peter attacks Morlun, stabs him in the shoulder with one of his stingers and bites him in the neck. He then apparently dies in MJ's arms. He finds himself face to face with a Spider monster who tells Peter that he has to either accept his spider side and evolve or die. Spider-Man embraces his "other" and recovers. He reunites with his friends and family and reveals that he has received new powers.
Spider-Man's advanced musculature produces less fatigue toxins during physical activity than an ordinary human. This allows him to exert himself physically for much longer periods of time before fatigue begins to impair him. At his peak, Spider-Man can physically exert himself at his peak capacity for many hours before the build up of fatigue toxins in his blood begins to impair him. He once fought Morlun for many hours continuously, and has stated an ability to hold his breath for at least twice as long as non-enhanced humans.

George Marston of Newsarama explaining why he felt that Spider-Man rogues gallery was the best was the thematic elements that the villains of Spider-Man manifested.[137] He explained that just like the superhero they have the same concept of science gone wrong. They are "like him, great men with great minds, great power, and great determination." But instead they fail to use their powers responsibly. Separating the thin line between being a hero from being a villain.[137]
Gabriel : Gwen's son by Norman Osborn. Norman convinced Gabriel and his sister, Sarah, that Peter Parker was their father and had killed their mother. Although Sarah is persuaded otherwise, Gabriel continues to believe so and takes on the identity of the "Gray" Goblin. After a confrontation with Spider-Man, he crashed into the river on his glider and lost his memories. Sarah took him to their home in France to recover. After failing to convince Sarah to join him, he flies off on a different glider. Introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man #509.

After graduating from High School, Peter Parker enrolled at ESU ( Empire State University) where Flash introduced him to Harry Osborn and Gwen Stacy. During this time, Aunt May suffered from a serious heart attack. Peter would constantly blow his friends off and they saw this as an insult. Eventually their relationship would get better as Peter became more involved with his peers. He and Harry became best friends and roommates. Peter also started dating Gwen Stacy. He would also meet Anna Watson's niece Mary Jane. Although he was attracted to Mary Jane, Peter decided to settle with Gwen because MJ was too much of a "party girl" for him. Peter loves Gwen, but their relationship was strained a bit by him constantly leaving to fight crime. Their relationship was saved by Gwen's father, Police Captain George Stacy, an ally of Spider-Man, who approved of Peter dating his daughter. Gwen's father was later killed during a battle between Spider-Man and Doctor Octopus, after he was crushed by falling debris while saving a child. In his dying breath, George called Spider-Man "Peter", revealing that he had always known about his dual identity and urged him to take care of Gwen. George's death caused a strain in the couple's relationship because Gwen blamed Spider-Man for her loss. She left Peter for some time to live with her uncle in London.
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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