Throughout Ireland and Britain, the household festivities included rituals and games intended to foretell one's future, especially regarding death and marriage.[57] Apples and nuts were often used in these divination rituals. They included apple bobbing, nut roasting, scrying or mirror-gazing, pouring molten lead or egg whites into water, dream interpretation, and others.[58] Special bonfires were lit and there were rituals involving them. Their flames, smoke and ashes were deemed to have protective and cleansing powers, and were also used for divination.[43] In some places, torches lit from the bonfire were carried sunwise around homes and fields to protect them.[42] It is suggested that the fires were a kind of imitative or sympathetic magic – they mimicked the Sun, helping the "powers of growth" and holding back the decay and darkness of winter.[54][59][60] In Scotland, these bonfires and divination games were banned by the church elders in some parishes.[61] In Wales, bonfires were lit to "prevent the souls of the dead from falling to earth".[62] Later, these bonfires served to keep "away the devil".[63]
Spider Woman a.k.a. Spider-Gwen might be from an alternate universe, but with her stylish look we think she’d be right at home on any planet. With this costume’s sleek hoodie and dynamic color scheme we’re sure you’re going to love pretending you’re the one who got bit by a radioactive spider. Give this cool costume a try to bring this up-and-coming superhero to life!

Christian Bale found the original Batsuit to be very uncomfortable and restrictive, as it was still very much derived from the standard WB batsuits of the past first established by Michael Keaton, with little improvement. The "bat suit wrangler", Day Murch from the 90's films was brought on to assist Bale and stuntmen like Buster Reeves. From Christopher Nolan's point of view, he was dissatisfied with the appearance of the foam rubber cowl, within the fiction it supposed to be made of a solid graphite material. For these reasons, Bruce's desire for a new costume in the movies was put into the story.
Holland also reprises his role in the third Avengers film, Avengers: Infinity War, where he joins the heroes in the fight against Thanos. He is first seen in action leaving a school bus during a field trip when he sees Thanos' forces invading New York before proceeding to help Stark, Doctor Strange and Wong in fighting off Cull Obsidian and Ebony Maw from kidnapping Strange. However, the Black Order succeeds in capturing Strange, leaving Parker and Stark to get inside the ship which the two Black Order members used to travel to Earth in order to rescue Strange. The two Avengers were able to send Maw into outer space and rescued Strange from being tortured when he refused to give up the Time Stone. The trio decide to head to Titan in order to deal with Thanos themselves only to meet Star-Lord, Mantis and Drax the Destroyer of the Guardians of the Galaxy who also went to Titan to fight Thanos and rescue Gamora. Thanos then arrives on Titan to attain the Time Stone from Strange which leads to him and the team having a fearsome battle and ends with Thanos being mentally incapacitated by Mantis while the others try to take off Thanos' Infinity Gauntlet from his hand. However, this plan fails after Quill attacks Thanos when he learns the former was responsible for Gamora's death which lets Thanos to break away from being mentally incapacitated.
Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and hobby horses were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[65] From at least the 18th century, "imitating malignant spirits" led to playing pranks in Ireland and the Scottish Highlands. Wearing costumes and playing pranks at Halloween spread to England in the 20th century.[65] Traditionally, pranksters used hollowed out turnips or mangel wurzels often carved with grotesque faces as lanterns.[65] By those who made them, the lanterns were variously said to represent the spirits,[65] or were used to ward off evil spirits.[69][70] They were common in parts of Ireland and the Scottish Highlands in the 19th century,[65] as well as in Somerset (see Punkie Night). In the 20th century they spread to other parts of England and became generally known as jack-o'-lanterns.[65]
An African-American woman acting as the newest Captain Universe joins the Avengers[22] in the fight against Ex Nihilo, his sister Abyss, and the Builder named Aleph on Mars. Captain Universe vaporizes Aleph when he does not agree to stop transforming or destroying planets.[23] She is revealed to be Tamara Devoux, a woman who remained in a coma for ten years after a car crash. During a talk with Nightmask, she translates his language and announces that not only is the universe dying, but the White Event is coming.[24]
Further customization comes with exploring the town as the New Kid fills out a 'character sheet' - finding characters who specialize in this fields and talking to them ad fulfilling tasks helps you discover your gender, race, economic class, etc. Of course, this still South Park, so none of it only matters - the Rednecks will try to beat you up anyway. (Some of the dialogue does change a little.)
The letters page for US Marvel Comics issue #64 declared The Transformers and Marvel Universes to be separate. In the process, it politely asked the readers to just forget about the issue guest-starring Spider-Man. But the Wiki never forgets. The Marvel Database wiki notes that the Spider-Man from the issue therefore appears to be a paradox, as he has memories of events of the mainstream "616" universe, but lives in a realm where few 616 heroes and villains exist.

The custom of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.[25] In 19th century America, Halloween was often celebrated with costume parades and "licentious revelries".[26] However, efforts were made to "domesticate" the festival to conform with Victorian era morality. Halloween was made into a private rather than public holiday, celebrations involving liquor and sensuality de-emphasized, and only children were expected to celebrate the festival.[27] Early Halloween costumes emphasized the gothic nature of Halloween, and were aimed primarily at children. Costumes were also made at home, or using items (such as make-up) which could be purchased and utilized to create a costume. But in the 1930s, A.S. Fishbach, Ben Cooper, Inc., and other firms began mass-producing Halloween costumes for sale in stores as trick-or-treating became popular in North America. Halloween costumes are often designed to imitate supernatural and scary beings. Costumes are traditionally those of monsters such as vampires, werewolves, zombies, ghosts,[28] skeletons, witches, goblins, trolls, devils, etc. or in more recent years such science fiction-inspired characters as aliens and superheroes. There are also costumes of pop culture figures like presidents, athletes, celebrities, or characters in film, television, literature, etc. Another popular trend is for women (and in some cases, men) to use Halloween as an excuse to wear sexy or revealing costumes, showing off more skin than would be socially acceptable otherwise.[29] Young girls also often dress as entirely non-scary characters at Halloween, including princesses, fairies, angels, cute animals and flowers.
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