May The Force be with your son this year in one of our 2018 boys Star Wars Halloween costumes! Whoever his favorite character is, your son can dress up in his image in our officially licensed costumes. These include our Darth Vader costume, featuring a jumpsuit with armor and 3D boot tops along with a mask, cape and molded belt. For extra authenticity, he can also get a lightsaber to complete the look of this feared villain. We also offer several Luke Skywalker costumes so he can join the Rebel Alliance in his tan tunic, belt, pants and boot covers.


Both Spider-Men face off against Mysterio's Avatar. Miles blindly attacks, but due to his lack of combat experience and tactics, he is easily thrown back into Peter and both end up in the East River. Mysterio then deploys high-technology and a strong chemical in order to create the illusion that a mob of Spider-Man's enemies from both realities is attacking them. During the battle, Peter figures out the trick and demands Mysterio to return him to his home universe. Angered, Mysterio decides to instead strand Peter in a world where he is believed to be dead. The avatar self-destructs rendering Miles unconscious. He later wakes up to see that the Ultimates and Nick Fury are on the scene. While his version of Tony Stark begins to work on deciphering Mysterio's dimension technology, Miles asks where Peter went. Fury surmised that he went off to find out the truth about his alternate self. Peter decides to investigate on his own and goes to the location where his apartment in his home universe is supposed to be. He finds it to be converted into a store, and while posing some questions to the cashier, he stops an armed gunman who was attempting a robbery. He is shocked to find out that the Peter Parker of this other world had died in battle and that the city was still mourning his tragic end. It is also common knowledge that Peter Parker was Spider-Man. Distraught over the news, he swings over to Queens where the Parker Residence is currently up for sale. May Parker is seeing off Gwen Stacy to school. When they both see Peter in his costume, they believe he is some lunatic who is disrespecting the memory of the deceased Peter Parker and threaten to call the police. They become shocked beyond words as Peter unmasks himself with tears in his eyes.[5]
Samhain (/ˈsɑːwɪn, ˈsaʊɪn/) was the first and most important of the four quarter days in the medieval Gaelic calendar and was celebrated on 31 October – 1 November in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man.[39][40] A kindred festival was held at the same time of year by the Brittonic Celts, called Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Kalan Gwav in Cornwall and Kalan Goañv in Brittany; a name meaning "first day of winter". For the Celts, the day ended and began at sunset; thus the festival began on the evening before 7 November by modern reckoning(the half point between equinox and solstice).[41] Samhain and Calan Gaeaf are mentioned in some of the earliest Irish and Welsh literature. The names have been used by historians to refer to Celtic Halloween customs up until the 19th century,[42] and are still the Gaelic and Welsh names for Halloween.

From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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