Depending on how you classify these things, it’s probably either Superman (the character who gave his name to the concept), Gilgamesh (powers beyond those of ordinary men!), or the Scarlet Pimpernel (who seems to be the first example, or at least the first that I can find, of the rich dandy who dons a mask to fight crime; Orczy’s book predates Zorro by a smidge, and Zorro was pretty clearly an influence on Batman). Tarzan, Doc Savage, Mandrake, and other pulp characters don’t seem to have some of the characteristics I’d look for.
The Sailor Moon series is known for featuring a substantial number of openly LGBT characters since its inception, as Japan have traditionally been more open about portraying homosexuality in its children's media compared to many countries in the West.[65][66] Certain characters who are presented as homosexual or transgender in one continuity may not be presented as such in others, particularly with dubbed versions made for international release.[67]
Here’s an example: If I’m your laundry object, you can give me your dirty clothes and send me a message that says, “Can you get my clothes laundered, please.” I happen to know where the best laundry place in San Francisco is. And I speak English, and I have dollars in my pockets. So I go out and hail a taxicab and tell the driver to take me to this place in San Francisco. I go get your clothes laundered, I jump back in the cab, I get back here. I give you your clean clothes and say, “Here are your clean clothes.”
One superpowered character was portrayed as an antiheroine, a rarity for its time: the Black Widow, a costumed emissary of Satan who killed evildoers in order to send them to Hell—debuted in Mystic Comics #4 (Aug. 1940), from Timely Comics, the 1940s predecessor of Marvel Comics. Most of the other female costumed crime-fighters during this era lacked superpowers. Notable characters include The Woman in Red,[18][19] introduced in Standard Comics' Thrilling Comics #2 (March 1940); Lady Luck, debuting in the Sunday-newspaper comic-book insert The Spirit Section June 2, 1940; the comedic character Red Tornado, debuting in All-American Comics #20 (Nov 1940); Miss Fury,[20] debuting in the eponymous comic strip by female cartoonist Tarpé Mills on April 6, 1941; the Phantom Lady, introduced in Quality Comics Police Comics #1 (Aug. 1941); the Black Cat,[21][22] introduced in Harvey Comics' Pocket Comics #1 (also Aug. 1941); and the Black Canary, introduced in Flash Comics #86 (Aug. 1947) as a supporting character.[23] The most iconic comic book superheroine, who debuted during the Golden Age, is Wonder Woman.[24] Modeled from the myth of the Amazons of Greek mythology, she was created by psychologist William Moulton Marston, with help and inspiration from his wife Elizabeth and their mutual lover Olive Byrne.[25][26] Wonder Woman's first appearance was in All Star Comics #8 (Dec. 1941), published by All-American Publications, one of two companies that would merge to form DC Comics in 1944.
By most definitions, characters do not require actual superhuman powers or phenomena to be deemed superheroes.[1][2][3] While the Dictionary.com definition of "superhero" is "a figure, especially in a comic strip or cartoon, endowed with superhuman powers and usually portrayed as fighting evil or crime",[4] the longstanding Merriam-Webster dictionary gives the definition as "a fictional hero having extraordinary or superhuman powers; also: an exceptionally skillful or successful person".[5] Terms such as masked crime fighters, costumed adventurers or masked vigilantes are sometimes used to refer to characters such as the Spirit, who may not be explicitly referred to as superheroes but nevertheless share similar traits.
During The Gauntlet storyline, a new Captain Universe makes himself known when he arrives on Earth with plans to kill Juggernaut.[17] Spider-Man learns that Captain Universe is a man named William Nguyen who wants revenge on Juggernaut for ruining his life during one of his rampages.[18] When he insists on trying to kill Juggernaut instead of fixing the tectonic plates beneath New York City, the Uni-Power leaves Nguyen and enters the Juggernaut. The Juggernaut, as Captain Universe, repairs the damage to the tectonic plates that was caused by him during the same rampage that ruined Nguyen's life. After the 'healing' of the tectonic plates, the Uni-Power subsequently leaves the Juggernaut and is not further seen.[19]
Jump up ^ "Bishop Challenges Supermarkets to Lighten up Halloween". The Church of England. Archived from the original on 18 May 2012. Retrieved 28 October 2009. Christianity needs to make clear its positive message for young people. It's high time we reclaimed the Christian aspects of Halloween," says the Bishop, explaining the background to his letter.
i agree with steve, in that the first superhero i could think of was gilgamesh. i think what jason is stuck on here is the first comic book hero - not just a character who uses superhuman powers for good, but one whose tales were published in modern drawning. if it wasn’t just drawn, but told through modern media that defines a superhero for jason, wouldn’t the shadow preceed mandrake in his radio drama? 

Dr. Doom has broken Dr. Octopus out of prison as the final mover in the latest plan for world conquest. Using Ock's expertise to help him draw on the arcane energies of the Negative Zone, Doom has found a way to wield absolute power. Now the only thing standing between Doom and his goals are Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four--and one of the F.F. is already Doom's prisoner!
Is there anything more perfect than Dorinda talking to her Halloween decorations? Yes, there is: It's drunk Dorinda trying to explain how she got her Lady Gaga costume made by way of Saturday Night Live, Andy Samberg and possibly Adam Sandler. Before she hosted her party—and got mad at Sonja for not greeting her as the host of the party—Dorinda hosted Luann for a post-divorce lunch.

American historian and author Ruth Edna Kelley of Massachusetts wrote the first book-length history of Halloween in the US; The Book of Hallowe'en (1919), and references souling in the chapter "Hallowe'en in America".[145] In her book, Kelley touches on customs that arrived from across the Atlantic; "Americans have fostered them, and are making this an occasion something like what it must have been in its best days overseas. All Halloween customs in the United States are borrowed directly or adapted from those of other countries".[146]


At the end of the Silver Age, Norman Osborn's memories began to flood back. He decided to hurt Peter as much as possible as the Green Goblin. He kidnapped Gwen Stacy and held her hostage at the Brooklyn Bridge. Spider-Man went to save Gwen and, despite being ill at the time, managed to defeat the Goblin. The Goblin threw Gwen off the bridge and, although Peter caught her by attaching a web line to her leg as she fell, the drop caused her neck to snap. As Spider-Man held Gwen's dead body, he vowed to kill the Goblin. He tracked him down to one of his warehouses. He brutally pummeled the Goblin in a fit of rage but managed to stop himself from committing murder. In one last attempt to achieve victory, Norman sent his Goblin Glider to impale Spider-Man from behind. Peter ducks and the Goblin is apparently killed from being impaled by his own glider. Mary Jane consoled Peter on the death of Gwen and the two started to date. Peter eventually proposed to her, but she refused and ended up breaking up with him. At this time Miles Warren, a college professor obsessed with Gwen became the deranged villain known as the Jackal. He hired the Punisher to kill Spider-Man and he also made copies of both Gwen and Peter. The Peter copy escaped and Gwen's copy eventually went back to Miles. Harry Osborn followed in the footsteps of his father and became the next Green Goblin. He blamed Peter for his father's death. Harry later lost his memory after a fight with Spider-Man. Harry's psychologist, Bart Hamilton attempted to take up the mantle of the Goblin himself but was killed by his own bomb while fighting Peter.
Two years later, during his final battle against the Green Goblin, rather than survive unscathed, Peter loses a leg to his arch-enemy and Osborn is killed.[volume & issue needed] Peter finally realizes the price he has paid for being Spider-Man, and ends his career to raise a family with Mary Jane and May. Over the years, he overcomes his physical handicap and ultimately joins the NYPD in a scientific capacity. However, after saving him from an insane Normie Osborn, his daughter May "Mayday" Parker begins a career as Spider-Girl behind his back, a decision Peter begrudgingly is forced to accept and deal with, made difficult by his love for May.[volume & issue needed]
In 1962, Marvel Comics editor and head writer Stan Lee was looking for a new superhero idea. He decided to create Spider-Man as a character with whom teens could identify, as there was a recent surge in teenage demand for comics. Lee was supposedly inspired for the concept of Spider-Man after observing a spider climb up a wall. Lee had to convince publisher Martin Goodman to introduce Spider-Man in the last issue of the canceled series Amazing Adult Fantasy, which was renamed Amazing Fantasy for that issue (#15, Aug. 1962). Lee then approached legendary artist Jack Kirby for an initial character design. However Lee was dissatisfied with Kirby’s attempt as the character turned out to be too heroic and Spider-Man was supposed to be a teenage boy. Lee then turned to Steve Ditko who developed the now iconic look of Spider-Man.
Jump up ^ Smith, Bonnie G. (2004). Women's History in Global Perspective. University of Illinois Press. p. 66. ISBN 9780252029318. Retrieved 14 December 2015. The pre-Christian observance obviously influenced the Christian celebration of All Hallows' Eve, just as the Taoist festival affected the newer Buddhist Ullambana festival. Although the Christian version of All Saints' and All Souls' Days came to emphasize prayers for the dead, visits to graves, and the role of the living assuring the safe passage to heaven of their departed loved ones, older notions never disappeared.
^ Despite first appearing in Spider-Man comic books, the Kingpin is more notable of being a Daredevil adversary. The character that represents the opposite of what Daredevil stands for. Despite this he is a major antagonist of both superheroes in the Marvel comic books just as recurringly.[9][156] He also is a major recurring villain in the rest of the Marvel Universe crossing over as major antagonists to superheroes/antiheroes (such as the Punisher) in certain comic books of the many based universes of Marvel. (PunisherMAX. etc.)[157]

Following the camp depiction of the 1960s live-action television series, director Tim Burton's Batman films feature an all-black Batsuit with bright yellow chest emblem, brass utility belt, heavy armor placed on the chest, forearms, and boots, with the chest armor incorporating the bat-emblem. This became the basic template on which all subsequent live-action Batsuits were based.
He has other options when it comes to which type of scary clown he’ll be dressing up as, including Twisty the Clown from American Horror Story. One of our most popular is Carver the Clown. With his gruesome mask and bright red hair, he looks just bloodcurdling enough that he could indeed live up to his name. If your son is the type who likes to jump out from behind doors and yell “Boo,” he’ll be thrilled with all the possibilities for causing hair-raising shrieks when he wears one of our boys scary clown costumes.

Dr. Watts (appeared in Spider-Man 2: Enter Electro): Dr. Watts (first name unknown) is a prominent scientist. She is the creator of the Bio-Nexus Device and a world-renowned scholar of biology. In the game, she is kidnapped by Hammerhead while attending the Science Industry Ball. During Spider-Man's fight with Hammerhead, Dr. Watts disappears, which led Spider-Man to believe that the Sandman took her. Due to an anonymous tip, Spider-Man tracks Dr. Watts to a museum, where she is taken hostage by Electro. After Electro leaves the museum, Dr. Watts tells Spider-Man that Electro went to the Twin Towers.
Secret Identity Male Characters Clones Single Characters Hazel Eyes Brown Hair Earth-616 Characters J.M. DeMatteis/Creator Mark Bagley/Creator Characters Living Characters Modern-Age Characters 1995 Character Debuts Power Grid Added Power Grid Complete Gifted Intelligence Superhuman (800 lbs-25 ton) Strength Superhuman Speed Regenerative Durability No Energy Projection Fighting Ability - Experienced fighter Clones Created By Miles Warren Shapeshifters Strength Class 10 Wallcrawling Superhuman Durability Leaping Killed by Kaine Human/Spider Hybrids Clones of Peter Parker Precogs Stretching Density Manipulation Cellular Degeneration Regeneration
From Tom De Haven and Dean Wesley Smith's look at Spidey's early career, to David Michelinie's portrait of a dying reporter who wants his last story to be the revelation of Spider-Man's true identity, to Lawrence Watt-Evan's tale of a bot whose web-slinger hero-worship leads to tragedy, plus stories by Craig Shaw Gardner, Ann Nocenti, Robert L. Washington III, Greg Cox, Christopher Golden, and many more-- here are spectaclar new tales of Spider-Man adventure!
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Gabriel Vargas Gabriel Vargas Captain Universe/Silver Surfer #1 (2005) A discharged Marine of the United States Marine Corps that was wounded in action and was honorably discharged. First Captain Universe to get arrested by the Kree after he stopped a group from killing Kree Civilians (Annihilation Wave Sympathizers). He was then assigned to Peter Quill's Special Ops group. During his mission he accidentally killed teammate Deathcry who was attempting to kill him after he 'stole' one of her kills. The Uni-Power leaves Gabriel after he cures the airborne Phalanx virus. Gabriel is killed by Phalanx Select Blastaar sometime after the Uni-Power leaves him.
Jump up ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 29. ISBN 978-0756692360. While he wouldn't have the same staying power as many other Stan Lee/Steve Ditko creations, the Crime Master gave villainy a good shot in this first half of a two-part Spider-Man adventure.
Two years later, during his final battle against the Green Goblin, rather than survive unscathed, Peter loses a leg to his arch-enemy and Osborn is killed.[volume & issue needed] Peter finally realizes the price he has paid for being Spider-Man, and ends his career to raise a family with Mary Jane and May. Over the years, he overcomes his physical handicap and ultimately joins the NYPD in a scientific capacity. However, after saving him from an insane Normie Osborn, his daughter May "Mayday" Parker begins a career as Spider-Girl behind his back, a decision Peter begrudgingly is forced to accept and deal with, made difficult by his love for May.[volume & issue needed]
Unlike well known rivalries in comics book depictions where heroes always still have more than one enemy but usually one archenemy (e.g., Joker, to Batman in DC Comics, Red Skull to Captain America, Doctor Doom to the Fantastic Four and the Brotherhood of Mutants to the X-Men in Marvel Comics etc.), Spider-Man is known to have three archenemies and it can be debated or disputed as to which one is worse:[123]

It is widely believed that many Halloween traditions originated from ancient Celtic harvest festivals, particularly the Gaelic festival Samhain; that such festivals may have had pagan roots; and that Samhain itself was Christianized as Halloween by the early Church.[12][13][14][15][16] Some believe, however, that Halloween began solely as a Christian holiday, separate from ancient festivals like Samhain.[17][18][19][20]
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