Batman stands tall above Gotham City, and often times he has the weight of the entire world on his shoulders. Does he have what it takes to defeat The Joker ? Bane? Doomsday? When your little one takes the mantle of The Dark Knight, there will be no need to fret over which villain is threatening the neighborhood, because we’re sure he’ll be able to just focus on his Halloween party and all of the trick-or-treating fun. But when it’s time to strike a pose and show the world that he’s The Bat, you’re going to want to get the picture just right. A little breeze will make his cape look epic, and when he has his fists on his hips, the molded effect of this premier costume really stands out. A stern face will project his newfound power, but if he happens to crack a smile, that photo will look just as epic.
In 1991, Sega released the first Spider-Man arcade game titled Spider-Man: The Video Game. Sega also released The Amazing Spider-Man vs. The Kingpin the same year. The Nintendo home consoles were late to the Spider-Man party, but they saw many Spider-Man titles themselves. The first was Spider-Man: Return of the Sinister Six, released in 1992 and considered by some to be one of the worst Spider-Man games of all time. Not all Spider-Man titles followed original story lines. In 1994, Spider-Man and Venom: Maximum Carnage was released for the Super Nintendo and the Sega Genesis. The game closely followed the Maximum Carnage Story Arc. 1995 gave us Spider-Man and Venom: Separation Anxiety, which was released on the Sega Genesis, the Super Nintendo and the PC. That same year, Spider-Man: The Animated Series was released for the Genesis and the Super Nintendo; it followed the storyline of the series, with most of the characters being represented the way they were in the cartoon. The next Spider-Man game, Spider-Man: Web of Fire, was released for the Sega 32X. This game is one of rarest and most valuable Spider-Man games to date. For the next couple of years, no game completely dedicated to Spider-Man was released. However, in 1995 he made his fighting game debut in Capcom's Marvel Super Heroes arcade game (which was later ported to the Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn). He returned for the 1997 sequel Marvel Super Heroes vs. Street Fighter (which later ported to the Sony PlayStation and Sega Saturn) and its 1998 followup, Marvel vs. Capcom: Clash of Super Heroes (which was later ported to the Sega Dreamcast and Sony PlayStation).
Whoo! The Nature Boy knows a thing or two about the ladies, and he's been Whoo-ing and strutting his stuff for close to 40 years now. And his sexy swagger hasn't diminished at all over the years, like a fine wine, The Nature Boy just keeps on walking down the aisle stylin' and profilin'. With this exclusive, you can suit up just like Ric Flair for some timeless sex appeal. As Ric says, "Because all the women want to be with me, all the men want to be like me."
We found out in a hurry after the hit films, Iron Man and Captain America: The First Avenger, that our brand new cinematic heroes were going to need a little help saving the world. That’s why fans were prepared when The Avengers took the world by storm! With a bevy of films under the Marvel Cinematic Universe, this group has become a fan favorite for those watching and wanting to pay homage to them by going in costume. When you can find a friend to go in a Hulk costume or Thor costume we think you’re going to find that your group has the chops to get the job done. And if you have a femme fatale to be the Black Widow? Well, then you’re going to be downright unstoppable in your Marvel costumes!
Bruce Banner--the Incredible Hulk--and his wife, Betty, travel to New York to meet an old friend. There, they discover that their friend is a target for assassination by the notorious Super-Skrull, an alien possessing all the powers of the Fantastic Four. Teaming-up with the amazing Spider-Man, the Hulk must stop the shapeshifting villain from carrying out his mission.
Most of the supervillains of Spider-Man would be introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man comic book starting with the Chameleon.[3] The early villains would be introduced in the 1960s in the Silver Age of Comic Books,[3] and created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko.[3] John Romita, Sr. replaced Ditko starting with the Rhino.[4] Gerry Conway later replaced Stan Lee and helped create new adversaries for the web-slinger and also helped pave the way to the Bronze Age of Comic Books with the death of Spider-Man's long time romantic interest, Gwen Stacy.[5][6][7] Many collaborators would soon take over The Amazing Spider-Man title. One of the more popular examples included Todd McFarlane's Venom in the Modern Age of Comic Books.[8]
Parades and processions provide opportunities for people to dress up in historical or imaginative costumes. For example, in 1879 the artist Hans Makart designed costumes and scenery to celebrate the wedding anniversary of the Austro-Hungarian Emperor and Empress and led the people of Vienna in a costume parade that became a regular event until the mid-twentieth century. Uncle Sam costumes are worn on Independence Day in the United States. The Lion Dance, which is part of Chinese New Year celebrations, is performed in costume. Some costumes, such as the ones used in the Dragon Dance, need teams of people to create the required effect.
In the 1930s, both trends came together in some of the earliest superpowered costumed heroes such as Japan's Ōgon Bat[9][10] (visualized in painted panels used by kamishibai oral storytellers in Japan since 1931), Mandrake the Magician[11][12][13] (1934), Superman in 1938 and Captain Marvel (1939) at the beginning of the Golden Age of Comic Books. The precise era of the Golden Age of Comic Books is disputed, though most agree that it was started with the launch of Superman in 1938.[14] Superman remains one of the most recognizable Superheroes to this day.[14] The success of Superman spawned a whole new genre of characters with secret identities and superhuman powers – the Superhero genre.[14]
After the war, Peter remains a fugitive and his Aunt May is shot by a sniper hired by the Kingpin. Peter finds himself in a place he has never been before. He dons his black costume and goes on a rampage to find his aunt's shooter. May has fallen into a coma and is in critical condition. Eventually Peter discovers that the Kingpin is the man responsible and tracks the crime-lord to Riker's Island Prison. He savagely beats Fisk to a bloody pulp but decides to leave him with his humiliating defeat as it's worse than death for Fisk. Peter warns the other inmates to stay away from his family and tells Fisk that when May dies, Peter will come back and finish him. Since Spider-Man is a fugitive, he is unable to get proper help for May and is forced to commit felonies to try and save her, before realizing that he has finally become what he has spent his life fighting, a criminal.
The thousands of Halloween postcards produced between the turn of the 20th century and the 1920s commonly show children but not trick-or-treating.[149] Trick-or-treating does not seem to have become a widespread practice until the 1930s, with the first U.S. appearances of the term in 1934,[150] and the first use in a national publication occurring in 1939.[151]
Spider-Man discovered the symbiote costume during the Secret Wars and it became his primary costume until he discovered that it was an alien feeding on him. With it, he had an unlimited supply of webbing, and the suit could mimic his civilian clothing. It didn't, contrary to popular belief, enhance his powers. After meeting with Mr Fantastic, he decided it must be destroyed and would later get rid of it using the sounds of a church bell. It would later bond with Eddie Brock to form the deadly villain known as Venom. The Black Cat would later give Spidey a cloth version of the black suit which he would start wearing for a time, switching between it and the red & blue costume. After the Kraven's last Hunt story and the appearance of Venom for the first time, Mary Jane urged Peter to stop wearing the costume because it reminded her of those traumatizing events. During the Back In Black story, after Aunt May was shot by a sniper, a darkness filled Spider-Man's heart like never before. He wore the black costume to show this dark side, becoming much more ruthless towards enemies (using torture for example). Peter attempted to infiltrate Stark Tower to stop Norman Osborn, he used a black costume made of unstable molecules to disguise himself as the Venom. During the Grim Hunt story, after Kraven was recovered, he presented Peter with a black costume as a calling card after the Kravinoffs killed Peter's "brother" Kaine. He once again wore this costume and became aggressive towards the villains, vowing to hunt them all down. He was about to kill Kraven with a spear until he was convinced otherwise by Arachne and Arana. The black suit represents Spider-Man's dark side.
Spider-Man: Reign depicts an older Spider-Man in the future who, having given up on crime-fighting, is driven back into action by the return of some of his old enemies, exposing a conspiracy by Venom to take control of the city with a mass of symbiotes.[41] The character is later killed by Daemos with his head smashed on Mary Jane Watson's tombstone in Spider-Verse.[citation needed]
A tokusatsu series featuring Spider-Man was produced by Toei and aired in Japan. It is commonly referred to by its Japanese pronunciation "Supaidā-Man".[187] Spider-Man also appeared in other print forms besides the comics, including novels, children's books, and the daily newspaper comic strip The Amazing Spider-Man, which debuted in January 1977, with the earliest installments written by Stan Lee and drawn by John Romita, Sr.[188] Spider-Man has been adapted to other media including games, toys, collectibles, and miscellaneous memorabilia, and has appeared as the main character in numerous computer and video games on over 15 gaming platforms.

In 2005, after a four-year break from comic appearances, Captain Universe returned in the second series of Amazing Fantasy.[2] Also in 2005, a series of one-shot specials linked together by the Uni-Power/Captain Universe were released featuring different characters from the Marvel Universe as the Uni-Power each imbues them with power of Captain Universe. These titles were Captain Universe/Hulk, Captain Universe/Daredevil, Captain Universe/X-23, Captain Universe/Invisible Woman and Captain Universe/Silver Surfer. The Uni-Power made a brief appearance in Nextwave, he also made a "cameo" as Cosmic Spider-Man for the variant cover of Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man #3 and played an important part in the Death's Head 3.0 saga chronicled in Amazing Fantasy.

Peter's life did not get any easier after his wedding. As soon as he returned from his honeymoon, he was attacked by Kraven the Hunter in one of the most traumatizing events in both Peter and MJ's lives. Kraven was seeking to regain the honor that his family had lost and to do so, he must prove his superiority over his greatest foe, Spider-Man. After ambushing him, Kraven shot Peter in the head with a rifle and buried him on his grounds. Kraven donned a black Spider-Man costume and became a merciless vigilante. He even defeated Vermin, a villain Spider-Man could not defeat on his own. After two weeks, it was revealed that Spider-Man was actually alive and Kraven shot him with a tranquilizer. Peter eventually made his way to Kraven's estate and brutally pummeled the hunter. Kraven was unconcerned as he has proven his superiority over his foe before and so he set the Vermin free. After Spider-Man left Kraven to capture Vermin, Kraven killed himself.
Janine Godbe a.k.a. Elizabeth Tyne The one great love of Ben's life. Ben found out Janine was living under an assumed name after she murdered the father who molested her. Ben confided in Janine that he was a clone of Spider-Man. Later Kaine forced Janine to fake her death to hurt Ben. Janine later turned herself into the police for killing her father. In the MC2 universe Darkdevil is Ben and Janine's son.
Maybe they need a full size Dark Knight to help them take on their task? Whether it’s trick-or-treating the toughest neighborhood or they’re preparing for an epic showdown with a top villain, we’re confident having an adult Batman will make sure they come out victorious. He’ll probably have all kinds of extra gadgetry in his adult-sized utility belt, and with his authentic Dawn of Justice Batman costume, your children’s costumes will achieve their full effect. For posing, Wonder Woman can show her muscles while Superman prepares to take flight, and no matter what the mission is, Batman will be there to look over the young ones, but he’s going to look pretty fantastic in his own right, too. This will definitely be a superhero costume team for the history books!
I’ve seen only brief mentions of The Phantom here - I’d have thought he was one of the earliest superheroes in comics. Checking Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Phantom - he’s described as the first costumed superhero, debuting in February 1936. So that predates some of the more well-known examples that started up a few years later (though maybe not the likes of The Shadow, but it depends on whether you think of him as a “costumed superhero” or not).
It begins with an orphan named Peter Parker, raised by his beloved Aunt May and Uncle Ben in Queens, New York. A quiet student, he works diligently at his studies and pines for the beautiful Mary Jane Watson. But this ordinary teenage boy is about to have his life turned upside down, when he is bitten by a genetically altered spider. Suddenly, he finds himself possessed of spectacular powers. He is now and forever Spider-Man!
Spider-Man also seems to have at least some degree of Super-Human sight, at least in order to assist his Superhuman speed, reflexes and agility. Ever since obtaining his powers, he has not needed his glasses, and has frequently pulled off impressive aiming feats with his webbing, although this is assisted with his Spider-Sense. Perhaps most impressively, during Spider-Island, a depowered Hercules with Spider-Man's power-set said he could see bullets in slow motion.
Sometime later, Spider-Man revealed his identity to the Black Cat who would end up breaking up with him. She was unable to bear the fact that Spider-Man liked to live a civilian life as Peter Parker instead of staying in costume. Mary Jane would return to New York and she visited Peter in his apartment. Meanwhile, the Puma had tracked down Spider-Man but Peter sensed his presence using his spider-sense.
Jump up ^ Saffel, p. 65, states, "In the battle that followed atop the Brooklyn Bridge (or was it the George Washington Bridge?)...." On page 66, Saffel reprints the panel of The Amazing Spider-Man #121, page 18, in which Spider-Man exclaims, "The George Washington Bridge! It figures Osborn would pick something named after his favorite president. He's got the same sort of hangup for dollar bills!" Saffel states, "The span portrayed...is the GW's more famous cousin, the Brooklyn Bridge. ... To address the contradiction in future reprints of the tale, though, Spider-Man's dialogue was altered so that he's referring to the Brooklyn Bridge. But the original snafu remains as one of the more visible errors in the history of comics."
The feast of All Hallows', on its current date in the Western Church, may be traced to Pope Gregory III's (731–741) founding of an oratory in St Peter's for the relics "of the holy apostles and of all saints, martyrs and confessors".[76][77] In 835, All Hallows' Day was officially switched to 1 November, the same date as Samhain, at the behest of Pope Gregory IV.[78] Some suggest this was due to Celtic influence, while others suggest it was a Germanic idea,[78] although it is claimed that both Germanic and Celtic-speaking peoples commemorated the dead at the beginning of winter.[79] They may have seen it as the most fitting time to do so, as it is a time of 'dying' in nature.[78][79] It is also suggested that the change was made on the "practical grounds that Rome in summer could not accommodate the great number of pilgrims who flocked to it", and perhaps because of public health considerations regarding Roman Fever – a disease that claimed a number of lives during the sultry summers of the region.[80]
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