Categories: Marvel Comics superheroesSpider-Man1962 comics debutsAmerican superheroesCharacters created by Stan LeeCharacters created by Steve DitkoChild superheroesComics adapted into animated seriesComics adapted into playsComics adapted into radio seriesComics adapted into television seriesComics adapted into video gamesComics by Stan LeeComics by Steve DitkoComics characters introduced in 1962Comics set in New York CityFictional adopteesFictional business executivesFictional characters from New York CityFictional characters with precognitionFictional characters with superhuman sensesFictional college studentsFictional inventorsFictional orphansFictional photographersFictional reportersFictional schoolteachersFictional scientistsFictional stalking victimsFictional victims of bulliesFictional vigilantesExperimental medical treatments in fictionMale characters in comicsMarvel Comics adapted into filmsMarvel Comics characters who can move at superhuman speedsMarvel Comics characters with accelerated healingMarvel Comics characters with superhuman strengthMarvel Comics martial artistsMarvel Comics mutatesMarvel Comics television charactersMarvel vs. Capcom fightersSpider-Man charactersSpiders in popular cultureSuperheroes who are adoptedSuperhero film charactersTeenage characters in filmTeenage characters in comicsSuperheroes with alter egosVideo game guest characters
The Classic Suit is the one Peter Parker begins this story using, and it appears he has been using this suit for the better part of 8 years. It features a smaller spider design on the front with the larger spider on the back - and more basic materials used in the design. It becomes damaged during the start of the story, during your fight with Kingpin.
^ Jump up to: a b c Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 36. ISBN 978-0756692360. Now it was time for [John Romita, Sr.] to introduce a new Spidey villain with the help of [Stan] Lee. Out of their pooled creative energies was born the Rhino, a monstrous behemoth trapped in a durable rhinoceros suit.
This series debuted in March 8, 2008 and is still in continuation, airing on the CW 4Kids at 10:00 a.m on Saturday mornings. This series would also make the 10th television series about Spider-Man. This series starts with Spider-Man (voiced by Josh Keaton) talking about how he spent his summer vacation and introducing himself as the Spectacular Spider-Man. The day before school starts he wants his piece of the action. He ends up stopping Flint Marko and Alex O' Hirn. Spidey says that this was his third time stopping them and he pulls out his new device, the spider-signal. Norman Osborn acquires a new enemy in The Vulture. Before he became The Vulture, he was a man who worked for Oscorp and created an invention known as the tech. flight. He demands that Norman publicly apologize to him for stealing his inventions and to say that it was all his idea. Norman won't apologize stating that no one would believe that he had created it. But all is not lost, as he is soon saved by Your Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man. The series artwork was created by Sean "Cheeks" Galloway. The same person responsible for some character design work for the Hellboy animated movies. The character designs resemble those of The Batman TV series, as they have been designed by the same people who worked on that show. This series is supposed to be like the 1960's version of Spider-Man. It doesn't start off like all of the other incarnations of Spider-Man, starting off with Peter getting bitten by a radioactive spider but with a twist. Peter just starts his junior yeah of high school and gets pushed around by jocks. He made friends in Harry Osborn and Gwen Stacy. Gwen Stacy is also Peters intellectual equal, getting a job working for Doctor Connors. Gwen and Peter also see their old friend Eddie Brock who Peters call bro because their parents were best friends. Both Eddie's and Peter's parents died in a plane crash. Ever since then, Eddie and Peter have had a close friendship. Peter betrays Doctor Connors trust by taking pictures of Spider-Man and Doctor Connors as the Lizard. This puts a strain on their friendship and their "brotherhood". Eddie knows about Gwen liking him but after all the things that he did wrong, it was the final straw when Peter goes to the prom with Mary Jane. This series is full of twists and turns. It ends its first season with Eddie being taken over by the symbiote and turning into Venom. After almost being beaten by Venom, he saves Gwen and continues to have a Thanksgiving dinner. Aunt May has come out of hospital after recovering from a heart attack, Peter cooks the thanksgiving dinner, Gwen brings over her family dinner and they all enjoy a nice meal. Peter washes the dishes and goes outside thanking Gwen for what she has done and for always being there. As Gwen is about to leave, she runs back, taking the advice MJ gave her, and gives Peter a kiss. Peter then realizes what Venom was talking about when he said that he is going to take away the person who means the most to him.
Dr. Watts (appeared in Spider-Man 2: Enter Electro): Dr. Watts (first name unknown) is a prominent scientist. She is the creator of the Bio-Nexus Device and a world-renowned scholar of biology. In the game, she is kidnapped by Hammerhead while attending the Science Industry Ball. During Spider-Man's fight with Hammerhead, Dr. Watts disappears, which led Spider-Man to believe that the Sandman took her. Due to an anonymous tip, Spider-Man tracks Dr. Watts to a museum, where she is taken hostage by Electro. After Electro leaves the museum, Dr. Watts tells Spider-Man that Electro went to the Twin Towers.
“First published in 1930, Gladiator is the tale of Hugo Danner, a man endowed from birth with extraordinary strength and speed. But Danner is no altruist. He spends his life trying to cope with his abilities, becoming a sports hero in college, later a sideshow act, a war hero, never truly finding peace with himself. The character of Danner inspired both Superman’s creators, and Lester Dent’s Doc Savage. But Wylie, an editor with the New Yorker, sought to develop more than a pulp hero. His Gladiator provides surprising insights into the difficulties suffered by the truly gifted when born in our midst.”
Halloween costumes in the contemporary Western world sometimes depict people and things from present times and are sometimes read in terms of their political and cultural significance. Halloween costumes are sometimes denounced for cultural appropriation when they uncritically use stereotypical representations of other groups of people.[38][39] Immigration and Customs Enforcement Secretary Julie Myers was involved in a scandal when she awarded "Best Costume" at the ICE Halloween party to an 'escaped Jamaican prisoner' dressed in dreadlocks and blackface.[40]
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