Halloween activities include trick-or-treating (or the related guising), attending Halloween costume parties, carving pumpkins into jack-o'-lanterns, lighting bonfires, apple bobbing, divination games, playing pranks, visiting haunted attractions, telling scary stories, and watching horror films. In many parts of the world, the Christian religious observances of All Hallows' Eve, including attending church services and lighting candles on the graves of the dead, remain popular,[21][22][23] although elsewhere it is a more commercial and secular celebration.[24][25][26] Some Christians historically abstained from meat on All Hallows' Eve, a tradition reflected in the eating of certain vegetarian foods on this vigil day, including apples, potato pancakes, and soul cakes.[27][28][29][30]
The haunted house as an American cultural icon can be attributed to the opening of the Haunted Mansion in Disneyland on 12 August 1969.[179] Knott's Berry Farm began hosting its own Halloween night attraction, Knott's Scary Farm, which opened in 1973.[180] Evangelical Christians adopted a form of these attractions by opening one of the first "hell houses" in 1972.[181]
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That storyline came at the behest of editor-in-chief Joe Quesada, who said, "Peter being single is an intrinsic part of the very foundation of the world of Spider-Man".[73] It caused unusual public friction between Quesada and writer J. Michael Straczynski, who "told Joe that I was going to take my name off the last two issues of the [story] arc" but was talked out of doing so.[75] At issue with Straczynski's climax to the arc, Quesada said, was
When Peter joined The Future Foundation he was given a new costume by Sue Storm. The suit is made of third generation unstable molecules. It has basic default settings however, by concentrating Peter can change the suit's designs and color. Spidey, Ben, Sue, and Reed will work along with other members of The Future Foundation to protect the Marvel Universe from its greatest future threats.
The New Kid is you, after all, so customizing your character remains a crucial part of the game. After selecting your character's sex and selecting from a variety of hairstyles and a default outfit, everything else plays out ingame. Costume pieces are no longer attached to stats, so now you can create your own unique and customization superhero costume. (Try to be a little more creative than Super Craig.)
Halloween or Hallowe'en (a contraction of All Hallows' Evening),[5] also known as Allhalloween,[6] All Hallows' Eve,[7] or All Saints' Eve,[8] is a celebration observed in a number of countries on 31 October, the eve of the Western Christian feast of All Hallows' Day. It begins the three-day observance of Allhallowtide,[9] the time in the liturgical year dedicated to remembering the dead, including saints (hallows), martyrs, and all the faithful departed.[10][11]
In the Amalgam Comics continuity, Spider-Man was combined with DC's Superboy to create Spider-Boy. He was featured in Spider-Boy #1 (April 1996) and Spider-Boy Team-Up #1 (June 1997). In this continuity, Spider-Boy is the clone of researcher Peter Parker, created during an explosion in the Project Cadmus Labs. Adopted by Cadmus director General Thunderbolt Ross, he is given the name "Pete Ross". Spider-Boy's power is the ability to redirect his own personal gravity, giving him the ability to climb walls, and to increase his strength. He is able to shoot webs using a special "Web Gun" developed by Cadmus. Spider-Boy is an honorary member of the Legion of Galactic Guardians 2099 (an amalgamation of DC's Legion of Super-Heroes and Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy plus the Marvel 2099 timeline). He is seen in the background during Spider-Verse to fight the Inheritors.
Batman's cape is made of "memory cloth," also developed by Lucius Fox. It is essentially flexible in its normal state, but becomes semi-rigid in a fixed form when an electric current is passed through it from the microcircuits in his right glove. Bruce also adds metal gauntlets with angular fin blades on the forearms, a weapon kept from his experience as a pupil of Ra's al Ghul's organization, the League of Shadows. Mainly used to block against knives or other stabbing weapons, Bruce managed to surprise Ra's by breaking the blade of his ninjaken in multiple places with the gauntlets.

Many superheroes have a secret identity, and wear a costume or uniform to help conceal that identity. The costume usually has a logo or symbol as part of its design. Sometimes the costume/uniform incorporates special equipment, tools or technology. For example: Iron Man's armor suit, Captain America's vibranium shield, Spider-Man's web-shooters.   

In 1994 Captain Universe appeared in a one-shot, coinciding with a promotion, with the claim that readers could have a comic about themselves made for a fee. The comics were generally stock stories, with minor details (such as skin or hair color, key names or phrases, etc.) altered based on information provided by the purchaser. Veterinary student Jeff Christiansen, who would later become the force behind the resurgence of the Official Handbooks of the Marvel Universe in the mid-2000s was made the official Captain Universe of the comic so that it could be considered an in-continuity comic. The one-shot was titled X-Men/Captain Universe: Sleeping Giants.
In the Larval Zooniverse, Peter Porker (who was secretly the superhero Spider-Ham) was working on an experiment that went awry and bestowed upon him the cosmic power of Captain Zooniverse. With this new power he defeated all of his enemies and trapped them in orbit around Earth. He returned home a bit later and began a new villain-free life with his girlfriend Mary Jane Waterbuffalo.[27]
Spider-Man Noir appears in Ultimate Spider-Man, voiced by Milo Ventimiglia. In the episode "The Spider-Verse: Part 2", after Green Goblin appears on the Noir reality to collect the DNA of that universe Spider-Man, he is confronted by both the "Noir" and the "Ultimate" Spider-Man, who had followed the Goblin to this universe. However, after rejecting an alliance proposed by his counterpart, Noir is forced to work together with him after the Green Goblin hijacks an airship to draw out Spider-Man Noir, taking a group of civilians present hostage, including Mary Jane. While the Ultimate Spider-Man is saving the hostages, Spider-Man Noir fights the Goblin on his own, but the Goblin manage to take the DNA of a distracted Spider-Man Noir and then departs. Spider-Man Noir admits to both Ultimate Spider-Man and Mary Jane that he should drop the "lone wolf" act, and as his counterpart follows the Goblin to another dimension, the two Spider-Men depart as friends. Spider-Man Noir later returns In "The Spider-Verse: Part 4", summoned by "Ultimate" Spider-Man along with other Spider-Man counterparts to form a team known as the Web-Warriors in order to combat the Green Goblin and Electro. After the villains are defeated, the Web-Warriors return to their respective dimensions. Spider-Man Noir makes a cameo in the fourth season episode "Miles from Home".
Rapper Kanye West makes a return to the South Park world, having fully teansformed into a "Gay Fish" (his only identification in the game) and seeking Sea-Man and the player's help to guide his "momma" to Heaven aboard a unicorn that farts rainbows. This is a reference to 'Only One', a real mobile game West is making about his real mother's ascension to Heaven.
Jump up ^ Moser, Stefan (29 October 2010). "Kein 'Trick or Treat' bei Salzburgs Kelten" (in German). Salzburger Nachrichten. Archived from the original on 17 March 2014. Retrieved 11 August 2017. Die Kelten haben gar nichts mit Halloween zu tun", entkräftet Stefan Moser, Direktor des Keltenmuseums Hallein, einen weit verbreiteten Mythos. Moser sieht die Ursprünge von Halloween insgesamt in einem christlichen Brauch, nicht in einem keltischen.
There’s a related question that has some bearing on the answer to the above question: what is a superhero? There have probably been books (or at least extensive Usenet threads) written on this topic, but a good baseline definition needs to acknowledge both the “super” and the “hero” parts. That is, the person needs to have some superhuman power or powers and has to fight the bad guys. But this basic definition is flawed. Superman is an alien, not human. Batman doesn’t have any super powers…he’s a self-made superhero like Syndrome in The Incredibles. Or can a superhero be anyone (human or no) that fights bad guys and is superior to normal heroes…the cream of the hero crop? And what about a costume or alter ego…are they essential for superheroism? These are all questions well-suited for asking the internet, so have at it: what’s a good definition for a superhero?
Enhanced Durability: Woven with durable fabric, Spider-Man's new suit is highly tear resistant, as seen when it received no damage after being dragged along the streets after a van, withstood the strain of Spider-Man holding the Staten Island Ferry together, and when it was unscathed by shards of shattered glass during the Rescue at the Washington Monument. In addition, the suit is waterproof, as showcased when the suit and its technological capabilities were unaffected despite being submerged in water.
It seemed that Spider-man was finally back on track, with his name cleared and his life finally looking a bit better than it had in recent months. Norman Osborn however kept being a disturbing presence to Peter and Mary Jane. He started a ritual known as the Gathering of the Five, with one person getting Ultimate power, one got death, one got insanity and so on. Norman thought he gained power, but it turned out that it was insanity that he got. He attacked and kidnapped Peter. While he was captive, Peter got the shock of a life-time. His aunt May was standing in front of him, alive and well. After Spider-man broke free and defeated Norman Osborn, seemingly for good, as he was taken to a mental hospital, Peter learned that it was in fact aunt May he found. Not a clone, not a hoax. Norman had apparently kidnapped May years ago, and had an actress surgically look like aunt May and play her part while she was dying. This was why 'aunt May' knew about Peter being Spider-Man, she was hired by Norman Osborn to play her! Reed Richards of the Fantastic Four assured Peter it was his aunt. Peter saw this as a sign and stopped being Spider-Man altogether, finally living a good life with his aunt May and his wife Mary-Jane.

Jump up ^ "Here's to the Soulcakers going about their mysterious mummery". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on 3 April 2013. Retrieved 6 November 2012. One that has grown over the past decade is the so-called Night of Light, on All Hallows' Eve, October 31. It was invented in 2000, in leafy Chertsey, Surrey, when perhaps 1,000 people took part. Now it is a worldwide movement, popular in Africa and the United States.
After Spider-Man successfully apprehended the Vulture, Stark offered Parker another suit if he moved into the New Avengers Facility as the newest Avenger. However, Parker turned Stark's invitation down, preferring to operate in Queens as a local hero instead. Impressed at his maturity, Stark accepted his decision and returned the second suit back to Parker, after having confiscated it earlier following the Ambush at the Staten Island Ferry.
This Spider-Man toy transforms into a streamlined futuristic "Spider-Car" based loosely on a Peugeot 908 V12 HDi DPFS LeMans-style racer. It is fairly compact and unfolds into a roughly 7" tall robot with much more angular features than the original motorcycle version. Unlike nearly every other Crossovers figure, this one lacks a gimmick of any kind other than being a transforming Spider-Man.
Gabriel : Gwen's son by Norman Osborn. Norman convinced Gabriel and his sister, Sarah, that Peter Parker was their father and had killed their mother. Although Sarah is persuaded otherwise, Gabriel continues to believe so and takes on the identity of the "Gray" Goblin. After a confrontation with Spider-Man, he crashed into the river on his glider and lost his memories. Sarah took him to their home in France to recover. After failing to convince Sarah to join him, he flies off on a different glider. Introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man #509.
He’ll be ready for battle in his Silver Mirror Ninja costume, which includes a hood with mirror mask. This fierce garb will look amazing on any budding fighter. For extra fierceness, get him the Skull Dragon Ninja costume, so he can be even more intimidating and feel extra powerful. He can practice his ninja moves in the days leading up to October 31 so that when he makes his debut in front of his classmates or goes around the neighborhood he’s perfected his role for the day.

Pursuing the Vulture once again, Peter Parker went to grab his homemade suit from beneath the school lockers. After changing hastily into his suit, Spider-Man went outside only to be ambushed by the Shocker, who subsequently knocked Spider-Man's Web-Shooters off his wrists, putting him at a disadvantage. Shocker relentlessly kept attacking Spider-Man, smashing him through school buses. Before Shocker could strike Spider-Man again, Ned used one of the Web-Shooters to distract the Shocker, and Spider-Man bound him to a school bus.[2]


In 1984, in order to get exclusive photographs of the new Decepticon fortress in Oregon, Peter Parker donned his Spider-Man costume and used his powers to sneak closer to the action. He intercepted Gears, who had been sent on a scouting mission, and attacked, thinking Gears was one of the invaders. When Skywarp threw a tank at a gaggle of unwary reporters, Gears saved them, convincing Spider-Man he was good.
Jump up ^ Cleene, Marcel. Compendium of Symbolic and Ritual Plants in Europe. Man & Culture, 2002. p.108. Quote: "Soul cakes were small cakes baked as food for the deceased or offered for the salvation of their souls. They were therefore offered at funerals and feasts of the dead, laid on graves, or given to the poor as representatives of the dead. The baking of these soul cakes is a universal practice".
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