Debra Whitman: a fellow Empire State University student and secretary whom Peter dates for a period of time, though his frequent disappearances complicate their relationship. She is eventually diagnosed with mild schizophrenia, ironically exacerbated by her "delusional" belief that Peter is Spider-Man. With Peter's help, she overcomes that idea. Soon afterward, she leaves New York after another man, Biff Rifkin, confesses his strong feelings for her.

Some superheroes use their powers to counter daily crime while also combating threats against humanity from supervillains, who are their criminal counterparts. Often at least one of these supervillains will be the superhero's archenemy. Some long-running superheroes and superheroines such as Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, Hulk, Green Lantern, the Flash, Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, Iron Man and the X-Men have a rogues gallery of many villains. There are movies and TV shows featuring various super heroes.
When it comes time for Halloween, there is a lot more to think about than picking out a costume. Plenty of strategizing comes with choosing the perfect outfit. For starters, you will need to know what size your child wears and check out some of our measurement charts to find the best fit. Trick-or-treating at night may be dangerous, so having reflectors or lights are definitely helpful. If you are buying for costumes and accessories for more than one person, be sure to check out any coupons and savings deals we have going on. 
Spider-Man has been featured numerous times in Hasbro's Marvel Legends series. He first appeared in the Movie Sandman Build-a-Figure wave in both his outfit from the first movie and his black costume from Spider-Man 3. He was next featured in the Arnim Zola Build-a-Figure series, this time sporting his Big Time costume. The movie version of Spider-Man from The Amazing Spider-Man 2 was then featured in the Ultimate Green Goblin Build-a-Figure wave. A classic version of Spider-Man was later featured in the Hobgoblin Build-a-Figure wave, nicknamed "Pizza Spidey" by fans due to the presence of a slice of pizza. The Ultimate version of Spider-Man was then featured in the Space Venom Build-a-Figure series. The Symbiote version of Spider-Man then appeared in the Sandman Build-a-Figure wave. A Spider-Man: Homecoming-themed wave was then launched, with Vulture's wings as the "Build-a-Vehicle" this time. The line featured the movie version of Spider-Man in his costume and his homemade suit, as well as Cosmic Spider-Man. Spider-Man has also been featured in several two-packs and box sets, including a Captain America: Civil War-themed set that included Iron Man and Captain America, and a two-pack with Ultimate Vulture.

From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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