Warren Ellis' parody of Kurt Busiek's Marvels, Ruins, was a two-part miniseries set in an alternative universe where the situations that led to the heroes of the Marvel Universe gaining superpowers instead led to the more realistic side effects of horrific deformities and deaths. In this world, when Parker was bitten by a radioactive spider, instead of gaining powers, he broke out into an infectious rash that covered his body before his painful death. He had visited the offices of the Daily Bugle beforehand and infected fellow photographer Phil Sheldon, who set off to figure out how his world took a wrong turn, but succumbed to the disease before he could write his book.
This series debuted on Fox October 2, 1999 and lasted through March 31, 2001. Spider-Man, in this series, was voiced by Rino Romano (making him the only voice actor to play both Spider-Man and Batman, the most-recognized characters from both DC and Marvel). This animated series was supposed to be the continuation of Spider-Man: The Animated Series show from 1994. This series would also take part in the future. The series starts off at the Polaris One site where JJJ's son, John Jameson is talking to the public. About 6 months ago, through an advanced space warp drive engine, the man made probe called Alita projected itself to the far side of the sun where Alita recorded an exact duplicate of Earth. An Earth-like planet in the same orbit on the other side of the sun. John continues to talk about the probe being destroyed. Since then, people question should there be a man-made mission to go to " Counter Earth". He goes on to say that there should be one to find out what was responsible for this and there should be an investigation. Peter then leaves to change into costume because his spider-sense is tingling. He sees Venom and Carnage and confronts them. The spaceship is readying for take off and Spidey battles Venom and Carnage while wondering what they are doing and why were they trying to stow away on the spaceship. Venom restrains Spidey and Carnage tells him that nothing will get in the way of them going to "Counter Earth" and joining the Synoptic. Spider-Man gets kicked off the flight and gets blamed for what happens to John during his mission. Six months later, they launch the Solaris II rescue mission to go to "Counter Earth". The Webslinger appears with his new suit featuring nano technology "borrowed" from the lab of Reed Richards. Microscopic robots cover his entire body with anti-symbiote devices. He is stopped by Nick Fury who gives Spidey a chance to redeem himself by taking the space shuttle to "Counter Earth", so he can go rescue John Jameson. Once on "Counter Earth", after almost being burned up on entry, Peter is under arrest and is sought out by Lord Tyger and the High Evolutionary. Spidey meets the people who are chasing him, known as the Knights of Wondergore. Lord Tyger introduces himself and the rest of the Knights of Wondergore; Ursula, Lady Vermin, and Sir Ram. While being chased throughout the city, he realizes that there is a high tech society where humanoid animals have taken over and the normal people live in the overpopulated slums. He was captured and told of what happened by the High Evolutionary who came from another planet to seek a place where petty humans squabbles; greed, selfishness, violence, and hatred was no more. He built his paradise with many experiments, using animals that he now calls Beastials. They are under the leadership of the High Evolutionary, are stronger, faster, and free of the primitive human mind. Spider-Man was rescued by the resistance who had been told that the war lasted for 50 years. Spidey finds John in the resistance deciding to stay until the humans are free of the High Evolutionary's oppression. Peter blends in with the humans to see what the "Counter Earth" world was like. After saving Shane Yamada-Jones from the robots, Naoko, Shane's mother, a doctor, helps Peter. He takes him into their home, providing Peter pays rent, giving him two weeks rent free for saving Shane's life. This series doesn't last long. Only thirteen episodes were broadcast ending with a cliffhanger. Six more episodes were made for the second season but were never aired.
What’s more fun than going all out with the scare factor on Halloween? Our scary boys costumes are the perfect way for your son to frighten his friends and classmates. This is the one night a year when you’re encouraged to look as grotesque as possible! What better way to do that than in an Exploding Guts Zombie Spandex Suit, with organs coming out of it? No one will be able to resist looking at him, even if they have to peek between their fingers! If he’s all about ghoulish horror or simply celebrating the darker side of life, we’ve got affordable boys horror costumes ranging from skeletons to monsters to vampires, werewolves or even the grim reaper.
If you want to make your Halloween costume something no one will ever be able to forget, add some incredible accessories! There are lots of different ways to add to your style. If you're dressed as a superhero, get weapons, gloves, boot tops, capes, and masks. If you're getting ready to battle the Sith as a powerful Jedi, or want to try the Kessel run as a smooth-talking smuggler, you can get lightsabers, blaster pistols, and helmets. There are lots of generic items you can use for almost any look, like solid-color capes, skin suits, hats, and boots, to help you create a look all your own.

Author and Ditko scholar Blake Bell writes that it was Ditko who noted the similarities to the Fly. Ditko recalled that "Stan called Jack about the Fly", adding that "[d]ays later, Stan told me I would be penciling the story panel breakdowns from Stan's synopsis". It was at this point that the nature of the strip changed. "Out went the magic ring, adult Spider-Man and whatever legend ideas that Spider-Man story would have contained". Lee gave Ditko the premise of a teenager bitten by a spider and developing powers, a premise Ditko would expand upon to the point he became what Bell describes as "the first work for hire artist of his generation to create and control the narrative arc of his series". On the issue of the initial creation, Ditko states, "I still don't know whose idea was Spider-Man".[26] Kirby noted in a 1971 interview that it was Ditko who "got Spider-Man to roll, and the thing caught on because of what he did".[27] Lee, while claiming credit for the initial idea, has acknowledged Ditko's role, stating, "If Steve wants to be called co-creator, I think he deserves [it]".[28] He has further commented that Ditko's costume design was key to the character's success; since the costume completely covers Spider-Man's body, people of all races could visualize themselves inside the costume and thus more easily identify with the character.[17]
Comic-book companies were in the early stages of cultural expansion and many of these characters played to specific stereotypes; Cage and many of his contemporaries often employed lingo similar to that of blaxploitation films, Native Americans were often associated with shamanism and wild animals, and Asian Americans were often portrayed as kung fu martial artists. Subsequent minority heroes, such as the X-Men's Storm and the Teen Titans' Cyborg avoided such conventions; they were both part of ensemble teams, which became increasingly diverse in subsequent years. The X-Men, in particular, were revived in 1975 with a line-up of characters culled from several nations, including the Kenyan Storm, German Nightcrawler, Russian Colossus, Irish Banshee, and Japanese Sunfire. In 1993, Milestone Comics, an African-American-owned media/publishing company entered into a publishing agreement with DC Comics that allowed them to introduce a line of comics that included characters of many ethnic minorities. Milestone's initial run lasted four years, during which it introduced Static, a character adapted into the WB Network animated series Static Shock.
So you're a bearded bro. Or a mustache wearing macho man. Or maybe you've got a fu manchu the likes of which few have ever seen! Whatever kind of facial hair you have, we're sure that you're not exactly looking to go clean shaven to portray your favorite character. Fret not, because fortunately we have a TON of costumes for men with beards, mustaches, sideburns! Peruse these top selling costume choices to pick out your favorite facial hair enhanced look.
Enhanced Reconnaissance Mode: This mode allows Spider-Man's hearing and optics to be enhanced. It enables both X-Ray and infrared vision to see through solid objects and locate his target. It also allows for enhanced audio reception capabilities to the point that he can eavesdrop on conversations from yards away. It also corresponds to the suit's database, allowing for data retrieval about certain individuals and their backgrounds.
"People often say glibly that Marvel succeeded by blending super hero adventure stories with soap opera. What Lee and Ditko actually did in The Amazing Spider-Man was to make the series an ongoing novelistic chronicle of the lead character's life. Most super heroes had problems no more complex or relevant to their readers' lives than thwarting this month's bad guys.... Parker had far more serious concern in his life: coming to terms with the death of a loved one, falling in love for the first time, struggling to make a living, and undergoing crises of conscience."
"Costume" often refers to a particular style of clothing worn to portray the wearer as a character or type of character at a social event in a theatrical performance on the stage or in film or television. In combination with other aspects of stagecraft, theatrical costumes can help actors portray characters' and their contexts as well as communicate information about the historical period/era, geographic location and time of day, season or weather of the theatrical performance. Some stylized theatrical costumes, such as Harlequin and Pantaloon in the Commedia dell'arte, exaggerate an aspect of a character.
^ Jump up to: a b c "BBC – Religions – Christianity: All Hallows' Eve". British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). 2010. Archived from the original on 3 November 2011. Retrieved 1 November 2011. It is widely believed that many Hallowe'en traditions have evolved from an ancient Celtic festival called Samhain which was Christianised by the early Church.... All Hallows' Eve falls on 31st October each year, and is the day before All Hallows' Day, also known as All Saints' Day in the Christian calendar. The Church traditionally held a vigil on All Hallows' Eve when worshippers would prepare themselves with prayers and fasting prior to the feast day itself. The name derives from the Old English 'hallowed' meaning holy or sanctified and is now usually contracted to the more familiar word Hallowe'en. ...However, there are supporters of the view that Hallowe'en, as the eve of All Saints' Day, originated entirely independently of Samhain ...
At one time, candy apples were commonly given to trick-or-treating children, but the practice rapidly waned in the wake of widespread rumors that some individuals were embedding items like pins and razor blades in the apples in the United States.[193] While there is evidence of such incidents,[194] relative to the degree of reporting of such cases, actual cases involving malicious acts are extremely rare and have never resulted in serious injury. Nonetheless, many parents assumed that such heinous practices were rampant because of the mass media. At the peak of the hysteria, some hospitals offered free X-rays of children's Halloween hauls in order to find evidence of tampering. Virtually all of the few known candy poisoning incidents involved parents who poisoned their own children's candy.[195]
These are not mere mortals but they are blessed with divine gifts. They were often agents of change bringing culture, social change or advancement to a civilization. Their stories were more than just historical lessons - there was an element of religion and cult worship. I would argue that they are part of the archetype of the superhero - even if they are foreign to our current definition.
“We are not asking to be coddled,” the open letter insists. “The real coddling is telling the privileged majority on campus that they do not have to engage with the brutal pasts that are a part of the costumes they seek to wear.” But no one asserted that students should not be questioned about offensive costumes––only that fellow Yale students, not meddling administrators, should do the questioning, conduct the conversations, and shape the norms for themselves.  “We simply ask that our existences not be invalidated on campus,” the letter says, catastrophizing.
In the late 1980s and early 1990s, theme parks entered the business seriously. Six Flags Fright Fest began in 1986 and Universal Studios Florida began Halloween Horror Nights in 1991. Knott's Scary Farm experienced a surge in attendance in the 1990s as a result of America's obsession with Halloween as a cultural event. Theme parks have played a major role in globalizing the holiday. Universal Studios Singapore and Universal Studios Japan both participate, while Disney now mounts Mickey's Not-So-Scary Halloween Party events at its parks in Paris, Hong Kong and Tokyo, as well as in the United States.[190] The theme park haunts are by far the largest, both in scale and attendance.[191]
^ The Amazing Spider-Man #299 is the first appearance of Eddie Brock as Venom. The alien costume debuted from The Amazing Spider-Man #252 and the symbiote bonded to Spider-Man in Secret Wars #8.[8] Venom's creators are determined by pre-alien costume by not counting the creators/designers of the alien costume, David Michelinie or Mike Zeck, or the Marvel Comics fan who originally though of the concept for the creators.[8][159][160]
J. Jonah Jameson is depicted as the publisher of the Daily Bugle and is Peter Parker's boss and as a harsh critic of Spider-Man, always saying negative things about the superhero in the newspaper. Despite his role as Jameson's publishing editor and confidant Robbie Robertson is always depicted as a supporter of both Peter Parker and Spider-Man.[47]
The Utility Belt is a specialized belt Batman wears to equip his crime-fighting gear. The utility belt is a modified climbing harness, with magnetized impact-resistant pouches, and canisters attached to the belt at ergonomic points for ease of reach. It carries a magnetic gas-powered grapple gun, an encrypted cell phone, Batarangs, a medical kit, smoke bombs, mini explosives, periscope, remote control for the Tumbler, mini-cam, money, and other unspecified equipment. Batman removed the belt's shoulder and chest straps because they constricted his movements.
In addition to the creation of new minority heroes, publishers have filled the identities and roles of once-Caucasian heroes with new characters from minority backgrounds. The African-American John Stewart appeared in the 1970s as an alternate for Earth's Green Lantern Hal Jordan, and would become a regular member of the Green Lantern Corps from the 1980s onward. The creators of the 2000s-era Justice League animated series selected Stewart as the show's Green Lantern. In the Ultimate Marvel universe, Miles Morales, a multiracial American youth who was also bitten by a genetically-altered spider, debuted as the new Spider-Man after the apparent death of the original. Kamala Khan, a Pakistani-American teenager who is revealed to have Inhuman lineage after her shapeshifting powers manifested, takes on the identity of Ms. Marvel in 2014. Her self-titled comic book series became a cultural phenomenon, with extensive media coverage by CNN, the New York Times and The Colbert Report, and embraced by anti-Islamophobia campaigners in San Francisco who plastered over anti-Muslim bus adverts with Kamala stickers.[57] Other such successor-heroes of color include James "Rhodey" Rhodes as Iron Man, Ryan Choi as the Atom, and Jaime Reyes as Blue Beetle.

Lesley Bannatyne and Cindy Ott both write that Anglican colonists in the Southern United States and Catholic colonists in Maryland "recognized All Hallow's Eve in their church calendars",[114][115] although the Puritans of New England maintained strong opposition to the holiday, along with other traditional celebrations of the established Church, including Christmas.[116] Almanacs of the late 18th and early 19th century give no indication that Halloween was widely celebrated in North America.[117] It was not until mass Irish and Scottish immigration in the 19th century that Halloween became a major holiday in North America.[117] Confined to the immigrant communities during the mid-19th century, it was gradually assimilated into mainstream society and by the first decade of the 20th century it was being celebrated coast to coast by people of all social, racial and religious backgrounds.[118] "In Cajun areas, a nocturnal Mass was said in cemeteries on Halloween night. Candles that had been blessed were placed on graves, and families sometimes spent the entire night at the graveside".[119]
American historian and author Ruth Edna Kelley of Massachusetts wrote the first book-length history of Halloween in the US; The Book of Hallowe'en (1919), and references souling in the chapter "Hallowe'en in America".[145] In her book, Kelley touches on customs that arrived from across the Atlantic; "Americans have fostered them, and are making this an occasion something like what it must have been in its best days overseas. All Halloween customs in the United States are borrowed directly or adapted from those of other countries".[146]
During The Gauntlet storyline, a new Captain Universe makes himself known when he arrives on Earth with plans to kill Juggernaut.[17] Spider-Man learns that Captain Universe is a man named William Nguyen who wants revenge on Juggernaut for ruining his life during one of his rampages.[18] When he insists on trying to kill Juggernaut instead of fixing the tectonic plates beneath New York City, the Uni-Power leaves Nguyen and enters the Juggernaut. The Juggernaut, as Captain Universe, repairs the damage to the tectonic plates that was caused by him during the same rampage that ruined Nguyen's life. After the 'healing' of the tectonic plates, the Uni-Power subsequently leaves the Juggernaut and is not further seen.[19]
Halloween costumes are costumes worn on or around Halloween, a festival which falls on October 31. An early reference to wearing costumes at Halloween comes from Scotland in 1585, but they may pre-date this. There are many references to the custom during the 18th and 19th centuries in the Celtic countries of Scotland, Ireland, Mann and Wales. It has been suggested that the custom comes from the Celtic festivals of Samhain and Calan Gaeaf, or from the practise of "souling" during the Christian observance of Allhallowtide. Wearing costumes and mumming has long been associated with festivals at other times of the year, such as on Christmas.[1] Halloween costumes are traditionally based on frightening supernatural or folkloric beings. However, by the 1930s costumes based on characters in mass media such as film, literature, and radio were popular. Halloween costumes have tended to be worn mainly by young people, but since the mid-20th century they have been increasingly worn by adults also.
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