“First published in 1930, Gladiator is the tale of Hugo Danner, a man endowed from birth with extraordinary strength and speed. But Danner is no altruist. He spends his life trying to cope with his abilities, becoming a sports hero in college, later a sideshow act, a war hero, never truly finding peace with himself. The character of Danner inspired both Superman’s creators, and Lester Dent’s Doc Savage. But Wylie, an editor with the New Yorker, sought to develop more than a pulp hero. His Gladiator provides surprising insights into the difficulties suffered by the truly gifted when born in our midst.”
Raimi was also initially slated to direct a fourth Spider-Man film, with a release date of May 6, 2011. The ill-fated movie was intended to continue with the same cast and crew with plot-lines established in the first three films. Disagreement between Raimi and producers Laura Ziskin and Avi Arad over the script -- and over the choice of villains in particular -- as well as concerns with the rising cost of production (Raimi and series star Tobey Maguire would have claimed a large portion of any film royalties) led to a cancellation of that film's production. Instead, the Sony owned Columbia Pictures decided on a reboot of the franchise.
While brooding in his study over how to be a more effective crime fighter, Bruce Wayne saw a bat come through his window (in the earliest Detective Comics portrayal simply flying in an open window, in Post-Crisis continuity such as Batman: Year One, dramatically crashing through the glass) and perch on the bust of his father. Realizing that "criminals are a superstitious, cowardly lot," Bruce adopts the persona of a bat in order to conceal his identity and strike fear into his adversaries. Subsequent origin tales have had Bruce terrified by bats as a child, and observing a bat costume worn by his father at a costume ball, but the primary impetus of his decision to adopt the bat persona has always been the incident of the bat coming in the window of his study. It is as a result of this incident that the batsuit was developed.

Encapsulation: Encapsulation is when attributes and methods are stored in a single class. The process of providing a public interface to interact with the object while hiding other information inside the object. Encapsulation means that the internal representation of an object is generally hidden from view outside of the object's definition.The main way that encapsulation helps reduce rippling effects of change is by keeping as many of the implementation details private to the class. By limiting the interface only to those members needed to use the class, many changes can be made to the implementation without affecting any code that uses the class. The class can be thought of as a 'capsule' or container for data and operations.
^ Another character commonly described as archenemy is Venom. Eddie Brock as Venom is commonly described as the mirror version or the evil version of Spider-Man in many ways.[8][9][123] Venom's goals are usually depicted as ruining Spider-Man's life and messing with Spider-Man's head.[86] Venom is also one of the most popular Spider-Man villains.[131] This popularity has led him to be an established iconic character of his own with own comic book stories.[8][132]

After returning from Berlin, Stark allowed Parker to keep the suit, although he advised the young hero not do anything he would or would not do and to remain on the ground, a tip which Parker accepted. Parker then asked when the next mission was, and Stark replied that if they needed him then someone would contact him, and appointed Happy Hogan to be their liaison.[2]
In the Clone Saga, a controversial story arc, the long lost Jackal-made copy of Peter Parker returns. For years he was believed to have died after his initial encounter with the real Peter Parker. The clone, who is now calling himself Ben Reilly spent years traveling the world as he knew there was no place for him in New York City again. When his aunt May was believed to be dying, Ben returned to New York and eventually met Peter Parker. At first the two fought and Peter saw Ben as a thread, but later on the two of them worked together, with Ben even taken over as Spider-man for some time when it was believed that Peter had lost his powers. It was also during this time that aunt May seemingly died of old age. Before she passed away, she told Peter that she had known about him being Spider-man for some time now. Years later, it would be revealed that it was not aunt May that had died, but a stand in that was the work of Norman Osborn. Peter remained out of super-heroin for some time, untill his powers seemingly returned and he and the Scarlet Spider fought side by side for some time. The story arc lasted for two years and ended with the death of Ben Reilly at the hands of a returning Norman Osborn who was revealed to be alive and has been pulling strings from the moment he was believed to have died. On that day, Peter felt to have lost a brother. Although Norman Osborn was defeated, it was far from the last thing that was heard from him. With his powers fully returned, Peter resumed his work as the Amazing Spider-Man once again.
Jump up ^ Cowsill, Alan; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1990s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 184. ISBN 978-0756692360. Todd McFarlane was at the top of his game as an artist, and with Marvel's release of this new Spidey series he also got the chance to take on the writing duties. The sales of this series were nothing short of phenomenal, with approx. 2.5 million copies eventually printing, including special bagged editions and a number of variant covers.
Peter Benjamin Parker is a photographer for the Daily Bugle newspaper under Editor-in-Chief Joe Robertson. Parker is also the friendly costumed hero Spider-Man. Spider-Man possesses the abilities of Earth arachnids, allowing him to fire thread-like projectiles from his wrists. These threads may be used to spin webs of near-limitless size, as well as to capture thieves and other assorted rogues in the selfsame manner as a spider entraps traditional insects. Those who wonder about his boundless strength would be advised to listen closely, as his spectacular might is the result of radioactive energy flowing through his very veins. The aforementioned web-like materials fired from his wrists can also be used as a means of swinging to and fro, meaning that those who wish to observe the Spider-Man in action can best do so by simply looking overhead. In addition, he is known to be primarily a nocturnal adventurer, appearing in the deep of night wherever evil is afoot. His alacrity is so great, his timing so amazing, he has been compared to a flash of light. Despite his best efforts and good intentions, it seems that his attempts at justice are often overlooked, and while other heroes may find celebrity and fortune, poor Parker is constantly in one hang-up or another. Regardless, the Spider-Man soldiers on; wherever there is a fight or ruckus or tussle, the Spider-Man can be found!

Beneath the rubble, Parker called for help and writhed in pain, but he noticed an image of his mask in the water and his own reflection. Remembering Stark's words, Parker finally understood what his mentor meant about separating his identity from his suit: with or without the suit, he was Spider-Man. Spider-Man regained his resolve and pushed the rubble off his back, and he continued his pursuit of the Vulture.[2]
The first Halloween haunted house run by a nonprofit organization was produced in 1970 by the Sycamore-Deer Park Jaycees in Clifton, Ohio. It was cosponsored by WSAI, an AM radio station broadcasting out of Cincinnati, Ohio. It was last produced in 1982.[182] Other Jaycees followed suit with their own versions after the success of the Ohio house. The March of Dimes copyrighted a "Mini haunted house for the March of Dimes" in 1976 and began fundraising through their local chapters by conducting haunted houses soon after. Although they apparently quit supporting this type of event nationally sometime in the 1980s, some March of Dimes haunted houses have persisted until today.[183]

After Peter had his aunt returned, he decided to stop being Spider-man for good. He started living in a new apartment with his aunt May and wife Mary-Jane. All of New York was wondering where Spider-Man could have gone after his seemingly final battle with the Green Goblin. He would not even react to messages send by Peter's good friend the Human Torch. Peter had found a job at a science-center where he did good work and stayed out of the superhero life, although it turned out that was harder then it seemed. It was at this time that a seemingly new Spider-Man appeared on the scene. It turned out that this was Mattie Franklin, a participant in the Gathering of the Five, whom got the gift of Power. She acted as Spider-man and later as Spider-Woman, when Peter finally accepted that he was needed as Spider-man and returned to the life as a superhero.

Jump up ^ Ditko, Steve (2000). Roy Thomas, ed. Alter Ego: The Comic Book Artist Collection. TwoMorrows Publishing. ISBN 1-893905-06-3. "'Stan said a new Marvel hero would be introduced in #15 [of what became titled Amazing Fantasy]. He would be called Spider-Man. Jack would do the penciling and I was to ink the character.' At this point still, Stan said Spider-Man would be a teenager with a magic ring which could transform him into an adult hero—Spider-Man. I said it sounded like the Fly, which Joe Simon had done for Archie Comics. Stan called Jack about it but I don't know what was discussed. I never talked to Jack about Spider-Man... Later, at some point, I was given the job of drawing Spider-Man'".

Jump up ^ Cleene, Marcel. Compendium of Symbolic and Ritual Plants in Europe. Man & Culture, 2002. p.108. Quote: "Soul cakes were small cakes baked as food for the deceased or offered for the salvation of their souls. They were therefore offered at funerals and feasts of the dead, laid on graves, or given to the poor as representatives of the dead. The baking of these soul cakes is a universal practice".
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