The first human Captain Universe was an astronaut named Captain Ray Coffin. He battled Baron Karza and sealed the Prometheus Pit between the Microverse and Earth.[3] Years later, the Uni-Power would possess his son Steve Coffin to battle Mister E and his shadow slaves.[4] It next possessed identical twins Ann Stafford and Clare Dodgson to capture Nemesis,[4] and then possessed small-time cat burglar Monty Walsh to stop mafia don Guido Carboni.[5] It then possessed Doctor Strange and Commander Arcturus Rann to reinforce the space-wall between the Microverse and the Macroverse.[6] It then possessed Bruce Banner for the first time, to defuse a nuclear missile, and wound up battling Banner's own alter ego, the Hulk.[7] Captain Universe was then next among the heroes summoned by the Grandmaster for the Contest of Champions.[8] The Captain Universe power next possessed Delayne Masters to defeat schoolyard bullies.[9] It then possessed Evan Swann to stop the Quantum Mechanic from destroying the Earth.[10]
Born to Richard and Mary Parker in Queens, New York, Peter Parker lost his parents at a very young age when their plane went down overseas while they were on a mission as government spies. He was raised by his aunt and uncle (May and Ben Parker) who, along with his teachers at Midtown High School, thought he had a bright future due to his affinity for science. However, Peter struggled with bullies and being teased for his introverted nature (sometimes referring to him as a "professional wallflower") and interest in science that pegged him as a teacher's pet.
Jump up ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 24. ISBN 978-0756692360. The Brain is an early Mobile Computer prototype built by I.C.M. in Midtown High School, where Peter Parker attended, it was deemed obsolete after Spidey's first encounter with it but it came back again.
Jump up ^ Kaplan, Arie (2008). From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books. The Jewish Publication Society. p. 120. ISBN 978-0827608436. In Uncanny X-Men #129 cover-dated Jan. 1979 and on sale in late 1978, writer Chris Claremont and the artist John Byrne created Katherine "Kitty" Pryde, aka Shadowcat, a young Jewish girl who possess the mutant ability to walk through walls.
Spider-Man (1967–70) episodes Spidey Super Stories (1974–77) The Amazing Spider-Man (1977–79) Spider-Man (1978–79) Spider-Woman (1979–80) Spider-Man (1981–82) The Capture of Captain America Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends (1981–83) episodes characters Spider-Man (1994–98) episodes characters Spider-Man Unlimited (1999–2001) Spider-Man: The New Animated Series (2003) The Spectacular Spider-Man (2008–09) episodes characters Ultimate Spider-Man (2012–17) episodes Spider-Man (2017–present) episodes
Sophia "Chat" Sanduval: A mutant known as Chat from the Marvel Adventures Spider-Man who appeared in issue 53 and is best friends with this version's Emma Frost. She has the power to talk to animals. She is one of the few people who knows Spider-Man's identity and has developed deep feelings for him. She and Peter begin dating, meanwhile Emma (with her own crush on Peter) shakes their relationship. Eventually, Chat becomes Peter's girlfriend.
In a parking lot, Spider-Man webbed Davis's hand onto his car bonnet, but Davis poked fun at Spider-Man for using a voice filter. Flustered, Spider-Man disabled the Enhanced Interrogation Protocol and asked for Vulture's location. Davis, grateful for Spider-Man's intervention several nights earlier, informed him of another weapons deal to be made on Staten Island Ferry.[2]
Reconnaissance Drone: In addition to altering the suit's size, the spider emblem on his chest is capable of detaching from its socket, utilizing a miniature propulsion engine from its tail section that allows it to fly through the air independent of Spider-Man's control. It has a tracker mode which allows it to fly onto a target and relay its position to the Spider-Man Suit, allowing Parker to follow targets through the interface of his Web-Shooters.
Peter Parquagh is a counterpart to Peter in the miniseries Marvel 1602, albeit without powers. In the series he acts as an apprentice to the royal spymaster Sir Nicholas Fury. A running gag involves Peter repeatedly almost getting bitten by unusual spiders, something that finally occurs at the very end. In the sequel, 1602: New World, he takes the identity of the Spider. Later, Peter's dual identity is revealed, and with the death of his beloved Virginia Dare at the hands of Norman Osborne, he returns to Europe and falls in love with Marion Jane Watson and joins her family of theater performers. During a battle with Baron Octavius, Norman Osborn, and Curtis Connors in Venice, a bystander picks up some of Peter's webbing which eventually served as the basis for the Super Soldier Serum and created Captain America in World War II in this universe.[26] While in the Globe theatre, he is attacked and killed by the supervillain Morlun.[27][28]
Though similar in appearance to the older costumes, this Batsuit is unique in and that it possesses a much larger amount of gadgetry than any other costume shown to date. Thus far, the Batsuit has been shown to not only contain multiple batarangs and other standard Bat-paraphernalia, but also a collapsible sword, wings, deep space gear, scuba equipment, and multiple rocket thrusters. Also, the emblem on Batman's chest can now transform into an emergency Batarang, becoming hard and rigid after being exposed to some sort of magnetic field emitted by the suit.
Spider-Man is zombified by Captain America. Unlike many of his zombie compatriots, Spider-Man is consumed with guilt over his need to eat flesh, though he is unable to prevent himself from satiating his hunger. He later eats Galactus, and becomes one of The Galactus, a number of heroes who obtain Galactus' powers due to consuming him. When his hunger begins to fade he turns on his fellow zombies, and later travels to Earth Z, where he kills the Sinister Six. He makes attempts to find a cure and succeeds, filling Sandman with nanobites and using him to wipe out all zombies, including himself.

In 1972, a second monthly ongoing series starring Spider-Man began: Marvel Team-Up, in which Spider-Man was paired with other superheroes and villains.[31] From that point on there have generally been at least two ongoing Spider-Man series at any time. In 1976, his second solo series, Peter Parker, the Spectacular Spider-Man began running parallel to the main series.[32] A third series featuring Spider-Man, Web of Spider-Man, launched in 1985 to replace Marvel Team-Up.[33] The launch of a fourth monthly title in 1990, the "adjectiveless" Spider-Man (with the storyline "Torment"), written and drawn by popular artist Todd McFarlane, debuted with several different covers, all with the same interior content. The various versions combined sold over 3 million copies, an industry record at the time. Several limited series, one-shots, and loosely related comics have also been published, and Spider-Man makes frequent cameos and guest appearances in other comic series.[32][34] In 1996 The Sensational Spider-Man was created to replace Web of Spider-Man.[35]
In this universe of Earth-1048, Peter has been Spider-Man for eight years and him and Mary Jane are just friends. After a heartbreaking battle against Doctor Octopus, Peter gets the cure to Devil's Breath virus, but is unable to save Aunt May because other people needed it so he was forced to sacrifice her. It's revealed that Aunt May knew about Peter's identity as Spider-Man. Miles Morales also appears where his father got killed from an attack by Mister Negative's Inner Demons and he got his powers from a genetically-altered spider which was brought unknowingly by Mary Jane Watson. In Spider-Geddon, Superior Spider-Man recruits Peter to fight the Inheritors after they defeated Tarantula.[83]
In 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States decided Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC, a case concerning royalties on a patent for an imitation web-shooter. The opinion for the Court, by Justice Elena Kagan, included several Spider-Man references, concluding with the statement that "with great power there must also come—great responsibility".[172]
In the episode "Traction," the Batman is badly injured by the immensely powerful Bane, due to which he is forced to build a prototype called the "Batbot" to battle the villain. Bruce Wayne controls the Batbot while sitting inside the cockpit. It is shown to possess the superhuman strength to match that of Bane, along with enhanced levels of agility and endurance. It has two turbos retro-thrusters flight on its back as well. The Batbot is also shown to be controlled via the Batman's utility belt (for example, in "The Cat and the Bat" episode).
After returning from Berlin, Stark allowed Parker to keep the suit, although he advised the young hero not do anything he would or would not do and to remain on the ground, a tip which Parker accepted. Parker then asked when the next mission was, and Stark replied that if they needed him then someone would contact him, and appointed Happy Hogan to be their liaison.[2]

Within the Marvel Universe there exists a multiverse with many variations of Spider-Men.[149] An early character included in the 1980's is the fictional anthropomorphic funny animal parody of Spider-Man in pig form named Spider-Ham (Peter Porker).[150] Many imprints of Spider-Men were created like the futuristic version of Spider-Man in Marvel 2099 named Miguel O'Hara. In Marvel Comics 2 imprint, Peter marries Mary Jane and has a daughter named Mayday Parker who carries on Spider-Man's legacy and Marvel Noir has a 1930's version of Peter Parker.[151] [149] [152] Other themed versions exist within the early 2000's such as an Marvel Mangaverse version and an Indian version from Spider-Man: India named Pavitr Prabhakar.[153] [149]

Critics in the legal community dispute whether the "Super Hero" marks meet the legal standard for trademark protection in the United States: distinctive designation of a single source of a product or service. Controversy exists over each element of that standard: whether "Super Hero" is distinctive rather than generic, whether "Super Hero" designates a source of products or services, and whether DC and Marvel jointly represent a single source.[48] Some critics further characterize the marks as a misuse of trademark law to chill competition.[49] To date, aside from a failed trademark removal action brought in 2016 against DC Comics' and Marvel Comics' United Kingdom registration, no dispute involving the trademark "Super Hero" has ever been to trial or hearing.[50]
^ Despite first appearing in Spider-Man comic books, the Kingpin is more notable of being a Daredevil adversary. The character that represents the opposite of what Daredevil stands for. Despite this he is a major antagonist of both superheroes in the Marvel comic books just as recurringly.[9][156] He also is a major recurring villain in the rest of the Marvel Universe crossing over as major antagonists to superheroes/antiheroes (such as the Punisher) in certain comic books of the many based universes of Marvel. (PunisherMAX. etc.)[157]

Possessing mental command over power tools, Toolshed is an extremely handy member of Freedom Pals. To the kids at school he is Stan Marsh but when darkness falls, Toolshed rushes into battle armed with contents of his dad’s workbench. The accident that give him the ability to control tools has sadly rendered his father an idiot, but he hopes one day to save him.
George Stacy (deceased): Gwen Stacy's father, Police Captain. Introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man (vol. 1) #56 (1968). He approves of Peter and Gwen's relationship as boyfriend and girlfriend. During a fight between Spider-Man and Doctor Octopus, he is crushed by falling debris while saving a child. As he dies, he reveals to Peter that he had known his identity for some time (something Peter had suspected anyway), and asks Peter to take care of Gwen.

Oh how nice it is to have the ladies of the Big Apple back for The Real Housewives of New York City season 10. Bethenny Frankel, Dorinda Medley, Carole Radziwill, Sonja Morgan, Tinsley Mortmier and Luann de Lesseps wasted no time getting into the drama at Dorinda's Halloween party. The drinks were orange, bubbly and flowing. The outfits were tight and the weaves were almost as big as the attitudes.
Halloween activities include trick-or-treating (or the related guising), attending Halloween costume parties, carving pumpkins into jack-o'-lanterns, lighting bonfires, apple bobbing, divination games, playing pranks, visiting haunted attractions, telling scary stories, and watching horror films. In many parts of the world, the Christian religious observances of All Hallows' Eve, including attending church services and lighting candles on the graves of the dead, remain popular,[21][22][23] although elsewhere it is a more commercial and secular celebration.[24][25][26] Some Christians historically abstained from meat on All Hallows' Eve, a tradition reflected in the eating of certain vegetarian foods on this vigil day, including apples, potato pancakes, and soul cakes.[27][28][29][30]
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