Similar to a grappling hook, the line launching gun uses a strong clamp attached to a high-tensil wire for scaling surfaces and/or traversing gaps. It can be recovered by releasing the clamp and rewinding the cable. It was based from one that is designed as compact climbing gear for commando units. It is propelled with compressed air, and works with a magnetic grappling iron. The thin climbing cable was tested on a load-carrying capacity of 350 lbs. The line can be attached to a reel in the buckle in the utility harness, but this was only used to escape after being defeated by the Scarecow in The Narrows.
Eventually, Vulture's Chitauri alien weapon malfunctioned. Spider-Man tried to web the weapon up and contain its energy, only for it to short-circuit and cut the ferry in half. Spider-Man attempted to save the ferry's occupants; at his request, Karen quickly calculated the strongest points of the ship, and Spider-Man linked 98 percent of those points together. However, he had missed two percent of the points, and it was this oversight that caused Spider-Man's webs to fail. Spider-Man desperately bound both halves of the ship together, though it kept falling apart. Iron Man eventually arrived to assist in Spider-Man's rescue, sealing the ship by reforging the cutlines. After that, he took Spider-Man away to have a private talk.[2]
‘We hebben inmiddels vijf jaar op rij het topniveau behaald in de Champions League van de internationale klantenservices’, kon Cindy Kroon (vice president Customers & Solutions regio NL/UK bij Nuon/Vattenfall) een tijdje terug wel van de daken schreeuwen na het binnenslepen van het COPC CX 6.0-certificaat. ‘En toch blijft dit voor ons iets heel bijzonders.’ Achterover leunen is er dan ook niet bij voor de energiespeler: samen met Bernard Steenbergen (director Customer Service Operations) daagt Kroon de organisatie continu uit dit niveau vast te houden. Minimaal.
Spider-Man is a fictional superhero in the Marvel Universe debuting in the anthology comic book series issue Amazing Fantasy #15 (August 1962) in the Silver Age of Comics published by Marvel Comics. After his debut he would get his own comic book entitled The Amazing Spider-Man. The comic book series would introduce many of what would become his major supervillain adversaries. Spider-Man would then be popular enough for more Spider-Man comic spinoffs (The Spectacular Spider-Man, Marvel Team-Up, Web of Spider-Man, Peter Parker: Spider-Man etc.) which introduced more recurring enemies of the web-slinger.
When the Guardians of the Galaxy traveled to the 20th century on a mission to destroy the Badoon, the Uni-Power possessed a Badoon worker named L'Matto in order to prevent the planned genocide. L'Matto's newfound knowledge was able to keep the Guardians from attacking but the Brother Royal then used the Badoon Captain Universe as his champion in a gladiatorial challenge which he had coerced the Guardians into accepting. L'Matto easily overpowered Charlie-27 and was about to kill him when Vance Astro and Dr. Strange arrived and joined in the battle, with Nikki and Talon pitching in as well. Despite this, it was not until Aleta (who had become the new Starhawk) arrived and attacked alongside Dr. Strange that L'Matto was finally defeated, enabling Strange to exorcise the Uni-Power which L'Matto had abused and return it to Earth.[13]
What if Spider-Man had never become a crimefighter explores a world where Spider-Man stopped the burglar from robbing the TV studio and continued his television career, becoming a public relations 'specialist' for superheroes until Jameson's angry attack on him for slacking off with his powers results in Daredevil's death, inspiring Spider-Man to become a real hero.[48] This version of Spider-Man is seen in "Spider-Verse" and apparently survived.

Captain Universe was the starring feature in issues #9-11 of the tryout series Marvel Spotlight. Marvel Spotlight editor Al Milgrom recalled being taken away by the concept of a Captain Universe serial: "You could come up with three issues, three disparate individuals - each one very different from the other - and see how they use their powers. They wouldn't necessarily be superheroic types; they'd be regular people who fell into the powers for just one issue. ... But Captain Universe never got his own title, so I'm guessing it didn't sell terribly well."[1] The character appeared sporadically through the remainder of the 1980s in titles such as Marvel Fanfare and Contest of Champions.
The toy's instructions are also somewhat crazy as they go through the entire transformation sequence, then end with a picture of Spider-Man transformed a totally different way from the waist down (resembling the picture on the back of the card). This was likely done because transforming him the correct way makes it impossible for him to stand without splaying his legs far out to the sides. The instructions also fail to note the step wherein his legs extend slightly to reveal double-jointed knees.
In Python, the datetime module contains examples of attributes. A datetime object has several pieces of information associated with it that a user can extract. For example, to get the day from the datetime object, a user could call datetime.day and to get the year, the user could call datetime.year and so on. The day and the year are attributes of a datetime object.
The student finally declares, “You should not sleep at night! You are disgusting!” Bear in mind that this is a student described by peers with phrases like, to cite one example, “I've never known her to be anything other than extremely kind, level-headed, and rational.” But her apparent embrace of an ideology that tends toward intolerance produce a very different set of behaviors.
Unseen scientist Mister Fantastic constructed large, transforming battle armour for various superhumans; Spider-Man received two, one based on each of his costumes, both of which could transform into a high-speed motorcycle. It is likely Richards gained the idea from Spider-Man, as it is inconceivable the encounter with the Transformers wouldn't have a lasting impact on the vigilante.[1]

From Tom De Haven and Dean Wesley Smith's look at Spidey's early career, to David Michelinie's portrait of a dying reporter who wants his last story to be the revelation of Spider-Man's true identity, to Lawrence Watt-Evan's tale of a bot whose web-slinger hero-worship leads to tragedy, plus stories by Craig Shaw Gardner, Ann Nocenti, Robert L. Washington III, Greg Cox, Christopher Golden, and many more-- here are spectaclar new tales of Spider-Man adventure!
Captain Universe generally possesses superhuman strength, flight, Uni-Vision (microscopic vision, X-ray vision, and telescopic vision), telekinesis, enhanced senses, and a psychic awareness of imminent danger; when a person already possessing one or more of these abilities was transformed into Captain Universe, those abilities were amplified by vast amounts. Some manifestations of the Uni-Power have demonstrated other, less common abilities as well as failing to exhibit some of the more 'usual' powers, which vary in intensity with each wielder according to the strength and imagination of each. Captain Universe usually possesses the ability of molecular rearrangement of organic and inorganic matter, transmutation of elements, the ability to fire bursts of energy and concussive force, and hypnosis (using the Uni-Vision energy). Possessing its own sentience, the Uni-Power can and will abandon a host if necessary, or if said host uses or intends to use the granted abilities in a detrimental or criminal fashion.
In 2012 a tie in to The Amazing Spider-Man movie, titled The Amazing Spider-Man,was released on June 26th. Spider-Man also featured as a playable character in the fighting game Marvel vs. Capcom Origins which was a compilation of the arcade games Marvel Super Heroes and Marvel vs. Capcom: Clash of Super Heroes. The game was released in during September 2012 on the PlayStation 3 Network and Xbox 360 Xbox Live Arcade services.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1970s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 72. ISBN 978-0756692360. Writer Gerry Conway and artist Ross Andru introduced two major new characters to Spider-Man's world and the Marvel Universe in this self-contained issue. Not only would the vigilante known as the Punisher go on to be one of the most important and iconic Marvel creations of the 1970s, but his instigator, the Jackal, would become the next big threat in Spider-Man's life.
In Batman: The Animated Series (1992–1995) the Batsuit is based on the "New Look" costume. The cape, cowl, gloves, briefs, and boots are dark blue, as indicated by the highlight. Occasionally the cape and cowl are also shown to be one piece and when he's not fighting, the cape sometimes resembles a cloak, draped over Batman's body. The costume lacks any armor qualities, instead of being merely a bodysuit with no apparent special features and it often becomes torn in serious fights. It is occasionally seen packed in Bruce Wayne's luggage or in his vehicles, and it is made clear that he has numerous spares.
^ Jump up to: a b Mary Mapes Dodge, ed. (1883). St. Nicholas Magazine. Scribner & Company. p. 93. 'Soul-cakes,' which the rich gave to the poor at the Halloween season, in return for which the recipients prayed for the souls of the givers and their friends. And this custom became so favored in popular esteem that, for a long time, it was a regular observance in the country towns of England for small companies to go from parish to parish, begging soul-cakes by singing under the windows some such verse as this: 'Soul, souls, for a soul-cake; Pray you good mistress, a soul-cake!'

Turn up the fun for your son’s night of trick-or-treating with one of Spirit’s boys TV and movie Halloween costumes. These officially licensed outfits will have him looking like he stepped straight off the big or small screen as one of pop culture’s most popular characters. These costumes are some of the most coveted because everyone at school and in the neighborhood will know exactly who he’s dressed as, from The Cat in the Hat to Kylo Ren. Our children’s Godzilla inflatable costume has a tail and appropriately angry face that will delight everyone who sees it. Dress as a hero in a classic Ghostbusters jumpsuit that will have you ready to take care of any kind of pesky paranormal activity going on. Finish the look by carrying around your handy P.K.E. Meter and wearing your Ecto Goggles!
Someone was probably smoking spinach when they suggested that Popeye was the first superhero. As the “Men of Tomorrow” book makes clear, the precursors to Superman and Batman were Doc Savage and The Shadow, created in the Street and Smith pulp magazines of the early ’30s. It is interesting to note that DC Comics currently plans to return its universe to its early roots and purge all magical powers from their characters, leaving Wonder Woman in limbo it would seem.
Kirby disputed Lee's version of the story and claimed Lee had minimal involvement in the character's creation. According to Kirby, the idea for Spider-Man had originated with Kirby and Joe Simon, who in the 1950s had developed a character called the Silver Spider for the Crestwood Publications comic Black Magic, who was subsequently not used.[note 4] Simon, in his 1990 autobiography, disputed Kirby's account, asserting that Black Magic was not a factor, and that he (Simon) devised the name "Spider-Man" (later changed to "The Silver Spider"), while Kirby outlined the character's story and powers. Simon later elaborated that his and Kirby's character conception became the basis for Simon's Archie Comics superhero the Fly.[24] Artist Steve Ditko stated that Lee liked the name Hawkman from DC Comics, and that "Spider-Man" was an outgrowth of that interest.[21]
The toy's instructions are also somewhat crazy as they go through the entire transformation sequence, then end with a picture of Spider-Man transformed a totally different way from the waist down (resembling the picture on the back of the card). This was likely done because transforming him the correct way makes it impossible for him to stand without splaying his legs far out to the sides. The instructions also fail to note the step wherein his legs extend slightly to reveal double-jointed knees.
There also contain many other versions of Spider-Man outside of comic books. Some in film, in television or in video games among countless other media. Some characters have crossed over in the comic book canon as one of the separate incarnations such as the Ultimate Spider-Man animated series version and the live-action Japanese show version appearing in "Spider-Verse". Also, one of the alternate Spider-Men from the series final of the 90s TV Show appeared in Spider-Verse as a background character, and the two live-action versions from the original trilogy and Amazing Spider-Man series are mentioned.
From at least the 16th century,[64] the festival included mumming and guising in Ireland, Scotland, the Isle of Man and Wales.[65] This involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food. It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf, similar to the custom of souling (see below). Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[66] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[67] In parts of southern Ireland, the guisers included a hobby horse. A man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[68] In Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[65] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient festival included people in costume representing the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[64] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod.[65] In the late 19th and early 20th century, young people in Glamorgan and Orkney cross-dressed.[65]
×