What if Spider-Man had never become a crimefighter explores a world where Spider-Man stopped the burglar from robbing the TV studio and continued his television career, becoming a public relations 'specialist' for superheroes until Jameson's angry attack on him for slacking off with his powers results in Daredevil's death, inspiring Spider-Man to become a real hero.[48] This version of Spider-Man is seen in "Spider-Verse" and apparently survived.
Joey Esposito of IGN, who gave the first issue an 8.5 out of 10, praised the creative team, singling out the strong thematic elements set up by Bendis, and the graceful line work, cityscapes, action and comedic timing of Pichelli's art. Esposito also complimented Cory Petit's lettering, comparing his use of different fonts when Spider-Man arrives in the Ultimate Universe to the use of color that characterizes Dorothy's arrival in Oz in the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz.[12] James Hunt of Comic Book Resources, who gave the issue four and a half out of five stars, called it "one of the most momentous Spider-Man stories to be published in years", praising the issue's pace and tone, and Pichelli's art.[13]
Students hailed Spider-Man as a hero for his elevator rescue after he returned to New York City. He learned from Karen that the suit was recording all of his activity, so he reviewed a log of the day of Brice and Schultz's arms sale; he decided to confront the customer, Aaron Davis. At Karen's suggestion, he activated the Enhanced Interrogation Protocol, which made his voice sound deeper and more menacing.
The custom of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.[25] In 19th century America, Halloween was often celebrated with costume parades and "licentious revelries".[26] However, efforts were made to "domesticate" the festival to conform with Victorian era morality. Halloween was made into a private rather than public holiday, celebrations involving liquor and sensuality de-emphasized, and only children were expected to celebrate the festival.[27] Early Halloween costumes emphasized the gothic nature of Halloween, and were aimed primarily at children. Costumes were also made at home, or using items (such as make-up) which could be purchased and utilized to create a costume. But in the 1930s, A.S. Fishbach, Ben Cooper, Inc., and other firms began mass-producing Halloween costumes for sale in stores as trick-or-treating became popular in North America. Halloween costumes are often designed to imitate supernatural and scary beings. Costumes are traditionally those of monsters such as vampires, werewolves, zombies, ghosts,[28] skeletons, witches, goblins, trolls, devils, etc. or in more recent years such science fiction-inspired characters as aliens and superheroes. There are also costumes of pop culture figures like presidents, athletes, celebrities, or characters in film, television, literature, etc. Another popular trend is for women (and in some cases, men) to use Halloween as an excuse to wear sexy or revealing costumes, showing off more skin than would be socially acceptable otherwise.[29] Young girls also often dress as entirely non-scary characters at Halloween, including princesses, fairies, angels, cute animals and flowers.
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