“Parents who wonder why college tuition is so high and why it increases so much each year may be less than pleased to learn that their sons and daughters will have an opportunity to interact with more administrators and staffers—but not more professors,” Benjamin Ginsberg observed in Washington Monthly back in 2011. “For many of these career managers, promoting teaching and research is less important than expanding their own administrative domains.” All over America, dispensing Halloween costume advice is now an annual ritual performed by college administrators.

As for the reason for Superhero’s; I think her’s (or ‘super’ heros) were always needed. It’s jsut earlier superhero’s like cowboys are not seen as super now. However, they were much better than the average at gunslinging and all had colerfull names and personalities. I think we the dawn of the 30s and in even earlier in the post World War I era, people realized that a gun slinging cowboy could not save them. People demanded (or wanted) hero’s with more powers. Hero’s that would not be plowed down by machine guns and rifles. Hense superman was made. As street crime began to dominate people’s fears, less super-human heros like Batman appeared. 

At his headquarters, Mysterio is preparing to cement his victory by destroying the portal and trapping Spider-Man in the Ultimate universe forever. But unable to resist the temptation to see how his enemy is faring, he keeps the portal open long enough for Peter and the Ultimates to capture him. Despite his best efforts to throw them off with his usual weapons, Mysterio is quickly defeated and Fury decides to keep him prisoner on their side of the rift due to his knowledge of Peter's secret identity. With the portal closing, Peter departs for his world after giving Miles his blessing as the new Spider-Man of this world, an acknowledgment that makes Fury and Miles very satisfied. Back in his world, Peter runs a search for Miles' counterpart in his world and is shocked at the result.[7]
The Sailor Moon series is known for featuring a substantial number of openly LGBT characters since its inception, as Japan have traditionally been more open about portraying homosexuality in its children's media compared to many countries in the West.[65][66] Certain characters who are presented as homosexual or transgender in one continuity may not be presented as such in others, particularly with dubbed versions made for international release.[67]

He first appeared as a Peter Parker double emerging from one of the Jackal's pods that initially an amnesiac but later believed himself to be the real Peter Parker, having been kept in stasis since the first Clone Saga. He claimed that both Peter Parker and Ben Reilly were his clones. However, upon meeting Parker, Reilly and Kaine, the Jackal's programming kicked in and he went insane before shapeshifting into a freakish giant, therefore revealing his true status as a clone. In denial of the truth, he tried to kill the "clones" and to claim Peter Parker's life as his own. He was even infatuated with Parker's wife Mary Jane Watson and seeks to have her as his bride. Since their first encounter, Reilly realizes that Spidercide is twisted from the start and expresses disgust of his corrupted doppelgänger's immorality, tauntingly refers him as "Freakface" once the villainous clone's shapeshifting powers manifest. However, this also causes Reilly to be afraid of his and Parker's capabilities for wicked if they allow themselves demoralize as Spidercide.
A version of Peter Parker exists, who is a child abused by his Uncle Ben. While locked in the cellar, he is befriended by a large spider-like creature, the Tallus instructs Blink and Nocturne to lead this universe's incarnation of Wolverine to the run down shack the Parkers call home, a fight ensues and the creature and Wolverine are both slain, as Blink and Nocturne depart this reality, it is shown that the creature bit the young Peter.[4]
Superhuman Durability: Under normal circumstances, Spidercide's body is somewhat harder and more resistant to certain types of physical injury than the body of a normal human. He can withstand powerful impact forces, such as falling from a height of several stories or being struck by a superhumanly strong opponent such as Spider-Man, that would severely injure or kill a normal human with little to no injury.
In 1984, in order to get exclusive photographs of the new Decepticon fortress in Oregon, Peter Parker donned his Spider-Man costume and used his powers to sneak closer to the action. He intercepted Gears, who had been sent on a scouting mission, and attacked, thinking Gears was one of the invaders. When Skywarp threw a tank at a gaggle of unwary reporters, Gears saved them, convincing Spider-Man he was good.

Of course, Marty went to the past and then Back to the Future, and if you're all about this top franchise of the 80s, you're going to want to set your sights on this Marty costume from the first movie. With the shirt, jacket, and vest (that looks suspiciously like a life preserver to the people of 1955), this costume set also includes some cool prop accessories that are sure to make you feel like a resident of Hill Valley—in any era!
Black Widow a.k.a. Natasha Romanova: During a HYDRA attempt to take over S.H.I.E.L.D., she is tortured to such an extent that she regresses back to an old cover identity of schoolteacher Nancy Rushman, but she is recovered by Spider-Man in time to help Nick Fury and Shang-Chi work out what had happened and restore her memory, with "Nancy" developing an attraction to Spider-Man before her memory is restored during the final fight against Madam Viper, Boomerang and the Silver Samurai.
Some boys want to grow up to be a big and strong man, and well, some boys just want to grow up to be a macho, macho man. If you've always found yourself in the latter category, then the easiest way to show off your sex appeal is by going in one of our officially licensed Village People Costumes! They're made and designed by us, and by far the most popular and instantly recognizable character is the Biker. This jacket and chaps set comes with the hat, thick manly mustache, and a fun chest chain to transform you into the iconic performer with some sizzling sex appeal.

Answering the call of justice, Call Girl disconnects criminals and places their evil ambitions on hold. Extending her influence from social media to the town of South Park, Wendy Testaburger is a gadgeteer and a white-hat hacker with a heart of gold who uses technology and an army of followers to unfriend evil. If you need information, just know that you can rely on... Call Girl!
It's been three weeks since spider-man foiled Doc Ock's plan and now Peter is invited to MJ's, which is Mary Jane's Club, but he is still under the weather because he was not able to prevent Silver Sables death, but while Peter is "having fun" at the party Carlie calls and tells Spider-man to come meet her at the cemetery. Spider-Man arrives and Carlie tells him that the grounds keeper saw a pale man digging the grave of Billie Connors with his bare hands and then vanishing into the dark with the body. Spider-Man instantly realized that this pale powerful man was Morbius and he goes to face him at Horizon labs. Spider-Man, disgusted by Morbius' actions, starts to attack him, but eventually stops when Michael explains that the reason he dug up the grave was to find a cure for the Lizard, and he tells Peter that he has already accomplished his goal. Spider-Man, hearing this, plans an attack on the Lizard and the confronts him in the sewers and fights him for a long period for time, but finaly Morbius and Spider-Man stab the Lizard with enough hypodermic harpoons for Max to bring Connor's back. But the Lizard is still in control, even in Kurt's body. The Lizard awakens Morbius' violent vampire side, with the smell of blood. And while Spider-Man was distracted with Morbius, Connors created the new serum that will turn him into the Lizard again, but this serums turns everyone into lizards except Connors himself, so while testing this serum Connors turns the entire Horizon Labs crew into Lizards. When he finally created the serum for himself, it turned him into a new version of the Lizard. When Spider-Man comes after capturing Morbius, Carlie tells him what has happened. Spidey creates a new cure and a battle ensures between Spider-Man and the Lizard. When Spider-Man stabs the Lizard with a harpoon filled with the cure, nothing happens, the cure doesn't work. Only at the end we see that the cure has actually worked and now Connors' mind is secretly in control of the Lizard's body.
In 1966, Marvel Comics introduced the Black Panther, an African monarch who became the first non-caricatured black superhero.[53] The first African-American superhero, the Falcon, followed in 1969, and three years later, Luke Cage, a self-styled "hero-for-hire", became the first black superhero to star in his own series. In 1989, the Monica Rambeau incarnation of Captain Marvel was the first female black superhero from a major publisher to get her own title in a special one-shot issue. In 1971, Red Wolf became the first Native American in the superheroic tradition to headline a series.[54] In 1973, Shang-Chi became the first prominent Asian superhero to star in an American comic book (Kato had been a secondary character of the Green Hornet media franchise series since its inception in the 1930s.[55]). Kitty Pryde, a member of the X-Men, was an openly Jewish superhero in mainstream American comic books as early as 1978.[56]

Some superheroes use their powers to counter daily crime while also combating threats against humanity from supervillains, who are their criminal counterparts. Often at least one of these supervillains will be the superhero's archenemy. Some long-running superheroes and superheroines such as Superman, Spider-Man, Batman, Wonder Woman, Hulk, Green Lantern, the Flash, Captain America, Thor, Wolverine, Iron Man and the X-Men have a rogues gallery of many villains. There are movies and TV shows featuring various super heroes.


When Marvel approached Hasbro about the prospect of including Spider-Man in the third issue of the Generation 1 comic book, they initially turned the idea down, since Spider-Man was currently licensed to rival toy company Mattel for the Secret Wars toyline. Marvel convinced them to permit the appearance by putting Spidey in his black costume, whereas the Secret Wars toy was clad in his traditional red and blue, and therefore wouldn't be "advertised" by the comic.[4] This meant adding a footnote to the story explaining that it took place prior to the recent issue of Spidey's own title in which he ditched the black threads upon finding out they were a symbiote.
Jump up ^ Carter, Albert Howard; Petro, Jane Arbuckle (1998). Rising from the Flames: The Experience of the Severely Burned. University of Pennsylvania Press. p. 100. ISBN 9780812215175. Halloween, incorporated into the Christian year as the eve of All Saints Day, marked the return of the souls of the departed and the release of devils who could move freely on that night. Fires lit on that night served to prevent the influence of such spirits and to provide omens for the future. Modern children go from house to house at Halloween with flashlights powered by electric batteries, while jack o'lanterns (perhaps with an actual candle, but often with a lught bulb) glow from windows and porches.

Regardless, Lee received Goodman's approval for the name Spider-Man and the "ordinary teen" concept and approached artist Jack Kirby. As comics historian Greg Theakston recounts, Kirby told Lee about an unpublished character on which he had collaborated with Joe Simon in the 1950s, in which an orphaned boy living with an old couple finds a magic ring that granted him superhuman powers. Lee and Kirby "immediately sat down for a story conference", Theakston writes, and Lee afterward directed Kirby to flesh out the character and draw some pages.[20] Steve Ditko would be the inker.[note 3] When Kirby showed Lee the first six pages, Lee recalled, "I hated the way he was doing it! Not that he did it badly—it just wasn't the character I wanted; it was too heroic".[20]:12 Lee turned to Ditko, who developed a visual style Lee found satisfactory. Ditko recalled:
During The Gauntlet storyline, a new Captain Universe makes himself known when he arrives on Earth with plans to kill Juggernaut.[17] Spider-Man learns that Captain Universe is a man named William Nguyen who wants revenge on Juggernaut for ruining his life during one of his rampages.[18] When he insists on trying to kill Juggernaut instead of fixing the tectonic plates beneath New York City, the Uni-Power leaves Nguyen and enters the Juggernaut. The Juggernaut, as Captain Universe, repairs the damage to the tectonic plates that was caused by him during the same rampage that ruined Nguyen's life. After the 'healing' of the tectonic plates, the Uni-Power subsequently leaves the Juggernaut and is not further seen.[19]
The ideas of second-wave feminism, which spread through the 1960s into the 1970s, greatly influenced the way comic book companies would depict as well as market their female characters: Wonder Woman was for a time revamped as a mod-dressing martial artist directly inspired by the Emma Peel character from the British television series The Avengers (no relation to the superhero team of the same name),[29] but later reverted to Marston's original concept after the editors of Ms. magazine publicly disapproved of the character being depowered and without her traditional costume;[30] Supergirl was moved from being a secondary feature on Action Comics to headline Adventure Comics in 1969; the Lady Liberators appeared in an issue of The Avengers as a group of mind-controlled superheroines led by Valkyrie (actually a disguised supervillainess) and were meant to be a caricatured parody of feminist activists;[31] and Jean Grey became the embodiment of a cosmic being known as the Phoenix Force with seemingly unlimited power in the late 1970s, a stark contrast from her depiction as the weakest member of her team a decade ago.
Despite his superpowers, Parker struggles to help his widowed aunt pay rent, is taunted by his peers—particularly football star Flash Thompson—and, as Spider-Man, engenders the editorial wrath of newspaper publisher J. Jonah Jameson.[47][48] As he battles his enemies for the first time,[49] Parker finds juggling his personal life and costumed adventures difficult. In time, Peter graduates from high school,[50] and enrolls at Empire State University (a fictional institution evoking the real-life Columbia University and New York University),[51] where he meets roommate and best friend Harry Osborn, and girlfriend Gwen Stacy,[52] and Aunt May introduces him to Mary Jane Watson.[49][53][54] As Peter deals with Harry's drug problems, and Harry's father is revealed to be Spider-Man's nemesis the Green Goblin, Peter even attempts to give up his costumed identity for a while.[55][56] Gwen Stacy's father, New York City Police detective captain George Stacy is accidentally killed during a battle between Spider-Man and Doctor Octopus (#90, November 1970).[57]
The letters page for US Marvel Comics issue #64 declared The Transformers and Marvel Universes to be separate. In the process, it politely asked the readers to just forget about the issue guest-starring Spider-Man. But the Wiki never forgets. The Marvel Database wiki notes that the Spider-Man from the issue therefore appears to be a paradox, as he has memories of events of the mainstream "616" universe, but lives in a realm where few 616 heroes and villains exist.
When fighting Electro, Spidey had to modify his costume to defeat his foe. He once made a costume from a rubber air mattress that made victory over Electro possible. On another occasion, when Electro's powers were amplified, Spider-Man used an improved version of the insulated costume that was resistant to Electro's attacks. With the help of X-Man, Spider-Man once again defeated Electro.
Parker appears in numerous What If? universes. Among these are realities in which he is a member of the Fantastic Four; in which he was not bitten by the spider but some other supporting cast member was; in which he chose not to go into superheroics; in which he joins with Wolverine and takes up black ops work; and in which he becomes a mutated spider creature.

This beggars belief. Yale students told to talk to each other if they find a peer’s costume offensive helplessly declare that they’re unable to do so without an authority figure specifying “any modes or means to facilitate these discussions,” as if they’re Martians unfamiliar with a concept as rudimentary as disagreeing in conversation, even as they publish an open letter that is, itself, a mode of facilitating discussion.


We find out in Batman V Superman Dawn of Justice just what it takes to save the day; two superheroes at odds, one bad guy to show up out of the blue, and a superheroine to come in and bail the boys out. Your group of children can become this cinematic version of the Justice League when they go in these authentic DC Comics movie costumes. You might discourage your pint-sized Batman taking on the boy in the Superman costume, but we’re sure when Wonder Woman shows up on the scene they’ll be on their best behavior. Have them pose before their adventure by having them put their hands on their hips while they are lined up in a row. With the fate of the world on the line, they’ll be prepared and ready to save the day!
Spider-Man has appeared in comics, cartoons, films, video games, coloring books, novels, records, and children's books.[159] On television, he first starred in the ABC animated series Spider-Man (1967–1970);[185] Spidey Super Stories (1974-1977) on PBS; and the CBS live action series The Amazing Spider-Man (1978–1979), starring Nicholas Hammond. Other animated series featuring the superhero include the syndicated Spider-Man (1981–1982), Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends (1981–1983), Fox Kids' Spider-Man (1994–1998), Spider-Man Unlimited (1999–2000), Spider-Man: The New Animated Series (2003), The Spectacular Spider-Man (2008–2009), and Ultimate Spider-Man (2012–2017).[186]
Steeds meer consumenten gebruiken social media als contactkanaal met organisaties. Ook HTM, de openbaar vervoerder uit regio Den Haag, ziet al jaren een gestage groei van klantcontact over kanalen als Facebook, Twitter en WhatsApp. Een groot deel hiervan werd al afgehandeld door klantcontactspecialist PCS, maar een chatbot biedt inmiddels de helpende hand. De door PCS en OBI4wan ontwikkelde tool heeft tot...

A bite from a radioactive spider on a school field trip causes a variety of changes in the body of Peter Parker and gives him superpowers. In the original Lee-Ditko stories, Spider-Man has the ability to cling to walls, superhuman strength, a sixth sense ("spider-sense") that alerts him of danger, perfect balance and equilibrium, as well as superhuman speed and agility. Some of his comic series have him shooting webs from his wrists. Academically brilliant, Parker has expertise in the fields of applied, chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, mathematics, and mechanics. The character was originally conceived by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko as intellectually gifted, but not a genius; however, later writers have depicted the character as a genius. With his talents, he sews his own costume to conceal his identity, and constructs many devices that complement his powers, most notably mechanical web-shooters. This mechanism ejects an advanced adhesive, releasing web-fluid in a variety of configurations, including a single rope-like strand to swing from, a net to bind enemies, and a simple glob to foul machinery or blind an opponent. He can also weave the web material into simple forms like a shield, a spherical protection or hemispherical barrier, a club, or a hang-glider wing. Other equipment include spider-tracers (spider-shaped adhesive homing beacons keyed to his own spider-sense), a light beacon which can either be used as a flashlight or project a "Spider-Signal" design, and a specially modified camera that can take pictures automatically.

These costumes are generally based around a very recognizable adolescent culture, like cartoons, movies, superheroes, and more. Make believe is a very important aspect of growing up, and taking on roles is one way children are able to engage their imagination and challenge their own personality, taking on other roles that may be otherwise out of the ordinary for them. These TV and movie characters, such as Boba Fett, Frankenstein, or Spider-Man, help your child to become their favorite hero, learning about themselves and their individuality in the process.
We would like to point out that while there’s lots of good to be done as a superhero, well, sometimes it’s just more fun to be a bad guy. If you have a group that relishes in deviousness there’s one cadre of callous evil-doers that stands out amongst a universe of comic book villains—Batman’s Rogues Gallery. The various villains Batman has faced over the years would make quite the ferocious force if ever they assembled together in the same lineup. Which is why you should totally do it with your group! There’s sure to be a Batman at your party anyway, so you might as well show up en masse to give him a tough time. Even if you’re not seeking to disrupt the peacetime partying, we’re sure there’s lots of fun to be had when these DC Comics characters get together!
As students saw it, their pain ought to have been the decisive factor in determining the acceptability of the Halloween email. They thought their request for an apology ought to have been sufficient to secure one. Who taught them that it is righteous to pillory faculty for failing to validate their feelings, as if disagreement is tantamount to disrespect? Their mindset is anti-diversity, anti-pluralism, and anti-tolerance, a seeming data-point in favor of April Kelly-Woessner’s provocative argument that “young people today are less politically tolerant than their parents’ generation.”
A geneticist named Miguel O'Hara gained his spider-like powers from a gene-splicing incident, when the company he was about to quit injected him with a dangerous drug called Rapture. He tried to rid himself of the drug by using the Gene Slicer he helped to invent, but unbeknownst to him a jealous co-worker had set it to repeat the previous experiment of a spider. The last time they had tried this experiment it killed the test subject (the main reason Miguel O'Hara quit), but this time it worked. Instead of becoming a company owned version of Spider-Man he became the opposite, a Spider-Man to fight Alchemax and the other large corporations ruling the world in 2099. He now fights crime as the Spider-Man of 2099.[29]
I actually do think The Incredibles explored this issue in a subtle way; the fact that the basis of Syndrome’s psychosis is that he was fixated on one element of the superhero making a person a “super” - special powers or abilities. That was evidenced in his plot to destory the ideas of “supers” by making everyone “super” eventually; as if giving everyone special powers is all it would take to eliminate the idea of heroes.
Jump up ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 34. ISBN 978-0756692360. Spider-Man was introduced to a new character in the form of the super villain called the Looter. The product of another [Stan] Lee and [Steve] Ditko collaboration, the Looter was born when hiker Norton G. Fester discovered and experimented on a mysterious meteor.
A previously unknown translation of an ancient grimoire, the Darkhold, has been unearthed by archaeologists in South America. But this chilling discovery will have far-reaching effects. Halfway across the globe, the Darkhold is relentlessly pursued by the Cabal of Scrier, an organization devoted to achieving ultimate power through whatever means necessary. And it is through their actions that a darkness from beyond the grave will return to haunt the Spectacular Spider-Man in the form of one of the most frightening and dangerous foes he's ever encountered....

From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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