If you've got an epic horseshoe mustache and the long sideburns to match, or are just willing to trim your black beard into a killer style, then there's only one character for you. Jules Winnfield from Pulp Fiction! This sharp tongued (but well dressed) man might recite a bible verse before he fulfills his contract, but we think you'll be a hot shot no matter what you say when you go in this iconic suit. Officially licensed, this suit is designed straight from the movie, and is the easiest way to portray the iconic Tarantino character and his sweet facial hair!
This suit is based upon a reality in which Peter Parker's uncle Ben did not die, and eventually learned how to bring other Spider-Men into his universe to absorb their powers. After trying to absorb Spider-Man from Earth-616 (our universe), things backfired and this version of Peter Parker was put into a coma, while his spirit was trapped in Hell. It wasn't until later that his spirit was freed, giving him a second chance at life as the Ghost Spider - bearing the flaming skull head
Jump up ^ Monaghan, Patricia (1 January 2009). The Encyclopedia of Celtic Mythology and Folklore. Infobase Publishing. p. 167. ISBN 9781438110370. Archived from the original on 23 April 2016. Retrieved 19 October 2015. They were both respected and feared. "Their backs towards us, their faces away from us, and may God and Mary save us from harm," was a prayer spoken whenever one ventured near their dwellings.
"Costume" often refers to a particular style of clothing worn to portray the wearer as a character or type of character at a social event in a theatrical performance on the stage or in film or television. In combination with other aspects of stagecraft, theatrical costumes can help actors portray characters' and their contexts as well as communicate information about the historical period/era, geographic location and time of day, season or weather of the theatrical performance. Some stylized theatrical costumes, such as Harlequin and Pantaloon in the Commedia dell'arte, exaggerate an aspect of a character.
In 1971, Kamen Rider launched the "Henshin Boom" on Japanese television in the early 1970s, greatly impacting the tokusatsu superhero genre in Japan.[28] In 1972, the Science Ninja Team Gatchaman anime debuted, which built upon the superhero team idea of the live-action Phantom Agents as well as introducing different colors for team members and special vehicles to support them, said vehicles could also combine into a larger one. Another important event was the debut of Mazinger Z by Go Nagai, creating the Super Robot genre. Go Nagai also wrote the manga Cutey Honey in 1973; although the Magical Girl genre already existed, Nagai's manga introduced Transformation sequences that would become a staple of Magical Girl media.

That's where we come in. We can help you to look like almost any kind of superhero you want to be. If you have a particular favorite character, chances are we have a costume for him/her. We have officially licensed costumes for most of the major DC and Marvel Comics characters. Plus, we have independent or spoof characters such as Ace & Gary, Kick-Ass, Duffman, Hellboy and the Watchmen.  
Whitney Chang (appeared in The Amazing Spider-Man and The Amazing Spider-Man 2, voiced by Claudia Black (ASM 1) and Sumalee Montano (ASM 2)): She is a top investigative reporter for the Channel 3 News Network and is well known for putting herself at risk for finding out the truth. She met Spider-Man in person while she was investigating a secret Oscorp facility involving cross-species genetics and its connection with Alistair Smythe, with Spider-Man tracking down a crate with Dr. Connor's research to create the cure. Whitney gave Spider-Man her camera and asks him to take photos exposing Oscorp's research. As explained in her bio, Chang grew up in the Sunset Park region of Brooklyn, New York, where she witnessed a neighbor being murdered by an angry mob after being framed for murder and being slandered by the news for days. After graduating from Yale, she quits her job as the host of a music video channel and snuck aboard a flight to Iraq, arriving just as American troops invade Baghdad. In The Amazing Spider-Man 2, through unspecified circumstances, Whitney leaves her job at the Channel 9 News Network and now works at the Daily Bugle. She works with Daily Bugle newcomer Peter Parker to expose Wilson Fisk as the Kingpin. Her role in Amazing Spider-Man 2 is lessened compared to its predecessor.
Spider-Queen has now evolved into a massive, spider-like monster, drawing strength from all infected New Yorkers. Mary Jane realizes that, because of her long relationship to Peter, she has some immunity against the disease, gaining spider-powers but not the subsequent mutations. Peter gives Kaine the Stealth Suit (immune to the Queen's sonic attacks) and Kaine goes to attack the Queen. Peter and Mary Jane gather several octobots, outfitting each with several doses of the cure, making them go out to cure people. Peter then connects with the antennae on top of the Empire State Building, curing many people at once, while Mary Jane fights off the spider-like creatures attacking them. Kaine jumps inside the Queen's mouth, killing her by reflecting her sonic scream on her insides. The Jackal uses a disguise to get samples of the Queen's bone marrow for future experiments.

From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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