In 2010, a stage musical entitled Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark opened on Broadway, with music by Bono and the edge and writing by Julie Taymor. The musical was wrought with problems from the very beginning, with multiple injuries happening to actors on the set, and a total cost of 75 million dollars for the production. After opening for previews, the show received many terrible reviews, and was temporarily shut down for rewrites.

Spider-Man Noir returns in the episode "Return to the Spider-Verse" Part 3", where he finds the "Ultimate" Spider-Man and Kid Arachnid tangle with Mr. Fixit (a Noir version of the Hulk) and his minions, Thunderbolt and A-Bombardier, who are in a gang war with the Noir version of Hammerhead. When Spider-Man Noir shows up, he doesn't want Spider-Man and Kid Arachnid to break up the gang war because since they last saw him, he lost his Mary Jane in an accident caused by Hammerhead's gang, for which he blames Mr. Fixit. Spider-Man finds the Siege Perilous fragment in the new machine gun that was provided by Hammerhead's minion Martin Li. Upon touching the Siege Perilous, Martin Li becomes the Mister Negative in order to become the new crime lord; he can transmutate anything to stone, and overthrows Hammerhead. After Mister Negative fends off Wolf Spider, Spider-Man and Kid Arachnid persuade Spider-Man Noir and Mr. Fixit to work together to help to stop Mister Negative. During the final fight, Noir Peter sacrifices himself by turning to stone after taking a blast meant for Fixit, but Fixit manages to restore everyone back to normal after taking the shard from Mr. Negative, which also restores the world to color. Noir Peter thanks Ultimate Peter and Miles before they leave and begins a partnership with Fixit. In the episode "Return to the Spider-Verse: Part 4", Noir Spider-Man is among the spider-powered individuals who had their life-force drained by Wolf Spider. He gets his life-force back upon Wolf Spider's defeat.
Jump up ^ Hörandner, Editha (2005). Halloween in der Steiermark und anderswo. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 99. ISBN 9783825888893. On the other hand the postmodern phenomenon of "antifashion" is also to be found in some Halloween costumes. Black and orange are a 'must' with many costumes. Halloween – like the medieval danse macabre – is closely connected with superstitions and it might be a way of dealing with death in a playful way.

The wearing of costumes is an important part of holidays developed from religious festivals such as Mardi Gras (in the lead up to Easter), and Halloween (related to All Hallow's Eve). Mardi Gras costumes usually take the form of jesters and other fantasy characters; Halloween costumes traditionally take the form of supernatural creatures such as ghosts, vampires, pop-culture icons and angels. In modern times. Christmas costumes typically portray characters such as Santa Claus (developed from Saint Nicholas). In Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States the American version of a Santa suit and beard is popular; in the Netherlands, the costume of Zwarte Piet is customary. Easter costumes are associated with the Easter Bunny or other animal costumes.
A close friend of Peter's, Jean DeWolff was killed by a criminal called the Sin-Eater. Spider-Man became determined to capture him before anyone else was hurt and so he teamed up with Daredevil, who also held a grudge against the criminal. After an encounter with Sin-Eater that left an innocent bystander harmed, Peter was drawn closer to the dark side. After saving Betty Brant from the criminal, Spider-Man was tempted to kill him but was stopped by Daredevil. The two heroes captured and unmasked the criminal and in the process formed a bond of friendship and trust between each other.
Cosplay, a word of Japanese origin that in English is short for "costume play", is a performance art in which participants wear costumes and accessories to represent a specific character or idea that is usually always identified with a unique name (as opposed to a generic word). These costume wearers often interact to create a subculture centered on role play, so they can be seen most often in play groups, or at a gathering or convention. A significant number of these costumes are homemade and unique, and depend on the character, idea, or object the costume wearer is attempting to imitate or represent. The costumes themselves are often artistically judged to how well they represent the subject or object that the costume wearer is attempting to contrive.
Doc Ock knows that he is soon going to die. Before his death, he wants to be remembered as the man who saved the world by stopping the Greenhouse effect. Spider-man doesn't believe Octavius, however, so he gathers the Avengers in order to discover Ock's true plan and put a stop to it. Unknown to Spider-Man, Doctor Octopus was well prepared for the fight and the Sinister Six subdue the Avengers. Doc Ock is about to kill Spider-Man, but Silver Sable comes to the rescue. She saves Peter and the Black Widow, and they set off to Octavius' manufacturing plants. There they encounter the Sandman, but they manage to beat him. Doc Ock asked the nations to capture Spider-Man (his position enabled him to do so) and he also called on many villains to take down Spider-Man. Parker knows that he can't stop Otto alone, so he asks other heroes to destroys Ock's facilities. When Spider-Man, Black Widow, and Silver Sable reach the main base in Romania, Doctor Octopus activates his satellites and every area that faces the sun explodes. It later turns out that this was only an illusion created by Mysterio, rather than reality. Spider-Man captures Mysterio and finds out that Doc Ock is hiding in Guatemala, but after Pete, Silver, and Natasha arrive at the site they're attacked by a group of mind controlled Avengers. Spider-Man, Black Widow, and Silver Sable gain an edge because the mind controlled Avengers are unable to fight as well as they would normally, and the Avengers are able to return to their senses thanks to Mysterio's technology. Black Widow was knocked out during the fight, however. Doctor Octopus launched several missiles so the Red Hulk, Iron Man, and Thor try to put an end to it. Mysterio reveals that Octavius' base is underwater, so Spider-Man and Sable resolve to put an end to Otto's plot once and for all. They unfortunately meet Rhino on their way, and he catches Sable and begins choking her in the water. With her final breath, Silver tells Peter to leave her and stop Otto. Spider-man is desperate to help her, but he knows that he's running out of time and is left with no choice. Spider-Man finally finds and battles Octavius, but he is eventually caught in the Doc's metal tentacles. With Parker trapped, Octavius reveals that his plan is to scar the earth, to be worse than Hitler and the other monsters, and in that way be remembered. Octopus removes his armor in order to activate his master plan, but Spider-Man tells Doc Ock that he had made an error in allowing himself to be distracted just long enough for Peter to break free. Spider-Man saves both Doctor Octopus and the world, but at the cost of Silver Sable's life.
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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