Unlike well known rivalries in comics book depictions where heroes always still have more than one enemy but usually one archenemy (e.g., Joker, to Batman in DC Comics, Red Skull to Captain America, Doctor Doom to the Fantastic Four and the Brotherhood of Mutants to the X-Men in Marvel Comics etc.), Spider-Man is known to have three archenemies and it can be debated or disputed as to which one is worse:[123]
Spider-Man has become Marvel's flagship character and has often been used as the company mascot. When Marvel became the first comic book company to be listed on the New York Stock Exchange in 1991, the Wall Street Journal announced "Spider-Man is coming to Wall Street"; the event was in turn promoted with an actor in a Spider-Man costume accompanying Stan Lee to the Stock Exchange.[9]:254 Since 1962, hundreds of millions of comics featuring the character have been sold around the world.[160] Spider-Man is the world's most profitable superhero.[161] In 2014, global retail sales of licensed products related to Spider-Man reached approximately $1.3 billion.[162] Comparatively, this amount exceeds the global licensing revenue of Batman, Superman, and the Avengers combined.[161]

Most of the supervillains of Spider-Man would be introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man comic book starting with the Chameleon.[3] The early villains would be introduced in the 1960s in the Silver Age of Comic Books,[3] and created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko.[3] John Romita, Sr. replaced Ditko starting with the Rhino.[4] Gerry Conway later replaced Stan Lee and helped create new adversaries for the web-slinger and also helped pave the way to the Bronze Age of Comic Books with the death of Spider-Man's long time romantic interest, Gwen Stacy.[5][6][7] Many collaborators would soon take over The Amazing Spider-Man title. One of the more popular examples included Todd McFarlane's Venom in the Modern Age of Comic Books.[8]

In the second volume of Spider-Verse set during the Secret Wars event, Spider-Man Noir found himself in the domain of the Battleworld called Arachnia, where he found and observed Spider-Gwen, Spider-Ham, Spider-Man: India, Spider-UK, and Anya Corazon (neither of them remembering their previous encounter during the original Spider-Verse), though he chose not to reveal himself to them until they crashed into one of his operations.[12]
The Marvel Zombies universe features a Spider-Man who has been turned into a flesh-eating zombie after being infected by Zombie Captain America.[12] Although Spider-Man is just as ravenous as the other zombies when hungry, when he has eaten, Spider-Man is racked with guilt at what he has done, especially for having eaten Mary Jane and Aunt May, but unable to change his nature.[13] At the conclusion of the original series, Spider-Man is one of the heroes who become The Galacti, having consumed the original Galactus and subsequently acquiring his cosmic powers.[14]
Jump up ^ Bannatyne, Lesley (31 August 1998). HALLOWEEN. Pelican Publishing Company. p. 19. ISBN 9781455605538. Villagers were also encouraged to masquerade on this day, not to frighten unwelcome spirits, but to honor Christian saints. Poor churches could not afford genuine relics and instead had processions in which parishioners dressed as saints, angels and devils. It served the new church by giving an acceptable Christian basis to the custom of dressing up on Halloween.

Michele Gonzales: Michele is a criminal defense lawyer and the hot-tempered sister of Peter's roommate Vin Gonzales, as well his temporary roommate while Vin serves time for his involvement in the Spider-Tracer Killings frame-up (to which she got him a plea bargain[6]). When Michelle attempts to kick Peter out (who is actually the Chameleon in disguise) she is instead seduced by him and become infatuated with him.[7] She is almost constantly angry, and questioning her or drawing attention to the size of her buttocks really sets her off.[8] However, she is also a helpful and kind person, by trying hard to help her clients get their lives back on track. After pestering and bothering Peter tirelessly, she returned to her previous home in Chicago shortly after Vin's release.[9]

The word 'superhero' dates to at least 1917.[6] Antecedents of the archetype include such folkloric heroes as Robin Hood, who adventured in distinctive clothing.[7] The 1903 play The Scarlet Pimpernel and its spinoffs popularized the idea of a masked avenger and the superhero trope of a secret identity.[7] Shortly afterward, masked and costumed pulp fiction characters such as Jimmie Dale/the Gray Seal (1914), Zorro (1919), The Shadow (1930) and comic strip heroes, such as the Phantom (1936) began appearing, as did non-costumed characters with super strength, including Patoruzú (1928), the comic-strip character Popeye (1929) and novelist Philip Wylie's character Hugo Danner (1930).[8]

Halloween costumes in the contemporary Western world sometimes depict people and things from present times and are sometimes read in terms of their political and cultural significance. Halloween costumes are sometimes denounced for cultural appropriation when they uncritically use stereotypical representations of other groups of people.[38][39] Immigration and Customs Enforcement Secretary Julie Myers was involved in a scandal when she awarded "Best Costume" at the ICE Halloween party to an 'escaped Jamaican prisoner' dressed in dreadlocks and blackface.[40]
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