His actions were violent, and the Jackal revealed he had been engineered to kill the real Peter, Ben, Kaine and Mary Jane. The Jackal further assisted "Peter" by giving him detailed info on various villains and allies of Spider-Man. As a joke, the Jackal said this "Peter" would commit mass "spidercide" on his behalf.[1] Spidercide stole a container of ribonucleic nanocontagium from the genetic research firm Genetech which lead him to have a confront with the New Warriors.[2] Using these materials, Spidercide and the Jackal killed 2600 people in Springville, Pennsylvania by releasing an airborne version of the Carrion virus. This same incident triggered the powers of Helix.[3]
In The New Batman Adventures (1997-1999) the Batsuit is revamped having the dark blue highlights on the cape, cowl, gloves, briefs, and boots changed to gray and the Bat-emblem is changed to a larger bat-emblem without the yellow ellipse and his utility belt is changed to light brown with the capsules being replaced with pouches. The Batsuit is based on the Batman: Year One costume.
^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 26. ISBN 978-0756692360. Spider-Man's arch nemesis, the Green Goblin, as introduced to readers as the 'most dangerous foe Spidey's ever fought.' Writer Stan Lee and artist Steve Ditko had no way of knowing how true that statement would prove to be in the coming years.
Today's comic books are descendants of 19th-century "penny dreadful" serials. They were multi-part sensational stories printed on cheap paper and sold for, what else, a penny each. These stories became popular among the lower and working classes. They couldn't afford, and weren't interested in, the "important" literary novels of the day. Penny dreadfuls and the "dime novels" that followed them had clear-cut good-vs.-evil themes. And they weren't short on action or melodrama, either! By the early 20th century, we had such enduring characters as Tarzan and Zorro in "pulp" fiction. (So-called because of the inexpensive paper on which it was printed.) The first of the modern superheroes was Superman, who launched the Golden Age of Comics in 1938.  
In 1966, Marvel Comics introduced the Black Panther, an African monarch who became the first non-caricatured black superhero.[53] The first African-American superhero, the Falcon, followed in 1969, and three years later, Luke Cage, a self-styled "hero-for-hire", became the first black superhero to star in his own series. In 1989, the Monica Rambeau incarnation of Captain Marvel was the first female black superhero from a major publisher to get her own title in a special one-shot issue. In 1971, Red Wolf became the first Native American in the superheroic tradition to headline a series.[54] In 1973, Shang-Chi became the first prominent Asian superhero to star in an American comic book (Kato had been a secondary character of the Green Hornet media franchise series since its inception in the 1930s.[55]). Kitty Pryde, a member of the X-Men, was an openly Jewish superhero in mainstream American comic books as early as 1978.[56]
George Stacy (deceased): Gwen Stacy's father, Police Captain. Introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man (vol. 1) #56 (1968). He approves of Peter and Gwen's relationship as boyfriend and girlfriend. During a fight between Spider-Man and Doctor Octopus, he is crushed by falling debris while saving a child. As he dies, he reveals to Peter that he had known his identity for some time (something Peter had suspected anyway), and asks Peter to take care of Gwen.
Mockingbird a.k.a. Barbara "Bobbi" Morse: As part of the All-New, All-Different Marvel, Bobbi is S.H.I.E.L.D.'s liaison with Parker Industries. She and Peter build a relationship slowly, with he providing her a new costume and working together to defeat Norman Osborn in Symkaria. After Peter shut down Parker Industries to stop Hydra from using his company for their own devices, she learns of his secret identity and allows him to stay at her apartment. After having stopping crime together to help Peter's self-esteem, they share a wonderful kiss. Peter lives in her apartment while recovering from the dismantling of Parker Industries. They end their relationship after realizing that outside of work and crime fighting, they don't have anything in common.
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Perhaps, Spider-Man's most famous piece of equipment is his self built web-shooters which allow him to shoot sticky ropes of webbing which he uses to swing from building to building. They are a pair of special wrist devices of Peter's own design that contain a material that mixes with air to web-like material. They can be used in many different ways by varying the pressure and adjusting the nozzles of the spinnerets. They can take the form of strong thin lines, as fine quick spreading lines, or as a thick adhesive liquid. Spider-Man can either use the webbing as web-gloves to protect his hands, as a Web-Parachute, an air-proof Web-Dome, a Web-Shield that offers protection from bullets and energy blasts, as small "web-bullets" that bounce off opponents, use the webbing to ensnare an opponent, tie foes up with a rope and hang them upside down from vertical poles, pulling his foes towards him, or shoot them in any direction he chooses Spider-Man's primary means of transportation is by the use of his webbing to swing around the city. He shoots a strand of webbing to a high location, like the edge of a building, and pushes his body towards any direction he chooses while holding on to the web, allowing him to traverse at an accelerated speed. This artificial webbing lasts for an hour before fading away. More recently he has evolved biological web shooters that spray webbing from his forearms but this power has been erased by Mephisto after the One More Day storyline.

When on a counter Earth, Peter Parker temporarily used his evil/good doppelganger's uniform. It was a look at the classic Spider-Man suit, red & blue, however with a modern twist. The Spider suit had web shooters built into the wrist bands/arms, and also featured a cape for mobility. This was used when Peter Parker's counterpart was badly wounded and needed Peter, Amazing Spider-Man, to fight crime in New York for a short time while Peter, the Amazing Spider, healed up. In the end, Peter Parker found out that his counterpart was actually draining the abilities of other Spider-Men and soon took the permanent role as the Amazing Spider.

Jump up ^ Jackson, Jeanne L. (1 January 1995). Red Letter Days: The Christian Year in Story for Primary Assembly. Nelson Thornes. p. 158. ISBN 9780748719341. Later, it became the custom for poorer Christians to offer prayers for the dead, in return for money or food (soul cakes) from their wealthier neighbours. People would go 'souling' - rather like carol singing - requesting alms or soul cakes: 'A soul, a soul, a soul cake, Please to give us a soul cake, One for Peter, two for Paul, have mercy on us Christians all.'
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