When Spider-Man first appeared in the early 1960s, teenagers in superhero comic books were usually relegated to the role of sidekick to the protagonist. The Spider-Man series broke ground by featuring Peter Parker, a high school student from Queens behind Spider-Man's secret identity and with whose "self-obsessions with rejection, inadequacy, and loneliness" young readers could relate.[9] While Spider-Man had all the makings of a sidekick, unlike previous teen heroes such as Bucky and Robin, Spider-Man had no superhero mentor like Captain America and Batman; he thus had to learn for himself that "with great power there must also come great responsibility"—a line included in a text box in the final panel of the first Spider-Man story but later retroactively attributed to his guardian, the late Uncle Ben.
While out web-swinging, Spider-Man sees a brilliant purple light from a distant warehouse, and investigates it to find Mysterio ranting about how he missed out on one chance to kill Spider-Man already. Although Spider-Man quickly defeats him and ties him up, when examining Mysterio's equipment, he is shot by Mysterio, causing him to fall through the rift created by the equipment. When he regains consciousness, he discovers that it is daylight. Although he interrupts a mugging, he is shocked and confused when the would-be victim informs him that, while he is grateful for the rescue, it might be disrespectful to be seen wearing Peter Parker's suit after his death. Swinging away to think about what he has just heard, Spider-Man runs into another Spider-Man on a rooftop.[3]
^ Norman Osborn using the alias as Green Goblin is Spider-Man's archenemy.[123][127][128] Mostly after he is responsible for setting up the death of Spider-Man's girlfriend in one of the most famous Spider-Man stories of all time which helped end the Silver Age of Comic Books and begin the Bronze Age of Comic Books.[123] He was thought to be dead after that but writers help bring him back from the 1990s and he returned to plague Spider-Man once more in the comic books (such as being involved of the killing of Aunt May) and other heroes (such as the Avengers[129]). He is also an enemy of Spider-Man sometimes just as Norman and not just only as the Green Goblin.[130]
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This version of Spider-Man first appeared in Marvel Adventures Spider-Man #53-#61 before appearing in the re-titled Spider-Man: Marvel Adventures comic book series. A modern-day high school student, this Spider-Man's origin is similar to his mainstream counterpart, but his supporting cast is significantly different. Although Gwen Stacy exists in this universe, she and Peter are not dating—instead Peter is dating a brand-new character named Sophia "Chat" Sanduval, who is a mutant with the ability to talk to animals. Peter's relationship with Gwen's father Captain George Stacy also differs from the original version—here, Captain Stacy discovers Peter's secret identity early on, yet rather than hide this information from Peter (as his mainstream counterpart did), he confides in Peter and becomes Spider-Man's unofficial police contact. While this Spider-Man battles super villains, he is generally more concerned with combating street-level crime and focuses heavily on taking down the Torino Family, a powerful New York City mob.[volume & issue needed]

Students hailed Spider-Man as a hero for his elevator rescue after he returned to New York City. He learned from Karen that the suit was recording all of his activity, so he reviewed a log of the day of Brice and Schultz's arms sale; he decided to confront the customer, Aaron Davis. At Karen's suggestion, he activated the Enhanced Interrogation Protocol, which made his voice sound deeper and more menacing.

Unbeknownst to Thanos, while he and Gamora were off retrieving the Soul Stone, Nebula escaped from his ship and contacted the remaining guardians telling them to meet her Thanos' destroyed homeworld, Titan. Iron Man and Spider-Man eventually track down Maw's ship and successfully rescue Doctor Strange after killing his captor Ebony Maw. Taking their newly acquired ship to Titan, Spider-Man, Iron-Man and Doctor Strange meet up with Nebual, Star-Lord, Drax, and Mantis. After getting to know and appraising each other on the situation, group forms a plan to remove Thanos' Infinity Gauntlet after Doctor Strange uses the Time Stone to view millions of possible futures, seeing only one in which Thanos loses. Shortly after forming this plan, Thanos arrives on Titan and, in an attempt convince the heroes to surrender the Time Stone to him, Thanos explains his reasons for wanting to wipe out half the population of the universe in a vain attempt to justify his plan as a necessary evil in order to ensure the survival of a universe threatened by overpopulation. His attempts at peaceful negotiation falling on deaf ears, the heroes attack Thanos and appear to have successfully subdued the mad titan until Nebula deduces that Thanos has killed Gamora. Enraged at the thought of the woman he loved being gone, Star-Lord attempts to kill Thanos which unfortunately allows Thanos to break the group's hold and overpower them. Iron Man is seriously wounded by Thanos, but is spared after Doctor Strange surrenders the Time Stone to Thanos.

The wierdly dressed Zur En Arrh Batman Skin comes from the alternate version of Batman seen in several comics. Batman of Zur-En-Arrh is in fact a backup personality of Bruce Wayne's - to be used in cases of extreme psychological trauma. This version of Batman is a lot more psychotic, and sees visions of a creature called Bat-Mite, among other apparations.


During the Spider-Verse storyline which featured Spider-Men from various alternate realities, Spider-Man Noir starred in one-shot comic Edge of Spider-Verse #1, at the end of which he was recruited by The Superior Spider-Man into his army of Spiders.[9] He was also featured prominently in Spider-Verse Team-Up #1, alongside a six-armed Spider-Man.[10] In Spider-Woman Vol. 5 #1, Spider-Man Noir found himself defending the lives of Silk and Spider-Woman (Jessica Drew) and got wounded in the process, after which he was returned to his home reality to heal and recuperate.[11]

Sarah (last name unrevealed): Gwen's daughter by Norman Osborn. Norman convinced Sarah and her brother, Gabriel, that Peter Parker was their father and had killed their mother. Sarah becomes suspicious after she meets Spider-Man however. She is convinced of the truth when Spider-Man saves her life by giving her a blood transfusion after she is shot by police. Spider-Man later learns that the pain caused by her accelerated aging has led her to abuse painkillers, and her addiction has gotten her in trouble with the French authorities. However, she promises to seek help, and perhaps someday become a hero herself. Introduced in The Amazing Spider-Man #509.
In 1998 writer-artist John Byrne revamped the origin of Spider-Man in the 13-issue limited series Spider-Man: Chapter One (December 1998 – October 1999), similar to Byrne's adding details and some revisions to Superman's origin in DC Comics' The Man of Steel.[36] At the same time the original The Amazing Spider-Man was ended with issue #441 (November 1998), and The Amazing Spider-Man was restarted with vol. 2, #1 (January 1999).[37] In 2003 Marvel reintroduced the original numbering for The Amazing Spider-Man and what would have been vol. 2, #59 became issue #500 (December 2003).[37]
Jump up ^ "Vigil of All Saints". Catholic News Agency. 31 October 2012. Archived from the original on 24 May 2013. Retrieved 1 November 2011. The Vigil is based on the monastic office of Vigils (or Matins), when the monks would arise in the middle of the night to pray. On major feast days, they would have an extended service of readings (scriptural, patristic, and from lives of the saints) in addition to chanting the psalms. This all would be done in the dark, of course, and was an opportunity to listen carefully to the Word of God as well as the words of the Church Fathers and great saints. The Vigil of All Saints is an adaptation of this ancient practice, using the canonical office of Compline at the end.
Gwen Stacy: Gwen was Peter's first serious girlfriend. She was very kind but slightly spoiled, smart, beautiful and shared Peter's love for science. Her father was police Captain George Stacy. Peter initially ignored her due to his concern for his sick Aunt May, which frustrated Gwen. First a friendship, then a romance gradually formed between the two, which lasted for over a year, until her death. She was killed by the Green Goblin when he threw her off a bridge. In House of M, Gwen is still alive and married to Peter.
By most definitions, characters do not require actual superhuman powers or phenomena to be deemed superheroes.[1][2][3] While the Dictionary.com definition of "superhero" is "a figure, especially in a comic strip or cartoon, endowed with superhuman powers and usually portrayed as fighting evil or crime",[4] the longstanding Merriam-Webster dictionary gives the definition as "a fictional hero having extraordinary or superhuman powers; also: an exceptionally skillful or successful person".[5] Terms such as masked crime fighters, costumed adventurers or masked vigilantes are sometimes used to refer to characters such as the Spirit, who may not be explicitly referred to as superheroes but nevertheless share similar traits.
The white areas in Spider-Mans eye cut-outs on his mask are really clever plastic lenses of the two-way mirror type. He can see out very clearly, but no one can see in. Therefore, he can never be recognized by the color of his eyes. These ingenious plastic lenses also protect his eyes from dust, dirt, and the glare of the sun. Spider-Man's colorful head-mask conceals his facial features and expressions and also effectively muffles his voice, making it unrecognizable. When using the Iron Spider-Man suit, it changed his voice in many ways. When Spider-Man became an Avenger, a special comm-link was outfitted into his mask allowing him to communicate with his fellow Avengers as well as others.
In Ireland and Scotland, the turnip has traditionally been carved during Halloween,[124][125] but immigrants to North America used the native pumpkin, which is both much softer and much larger – making it easier to carve than a turnip.[124] The American tradition of carving pumpkins is recorded in 1837[126] and was originally associated with harvest time in general, not becoming specifically associated with Halloween until the mid-to-late 19th century.[127]
Spider-Queen has now evolved into a massive, spider-like monster, drawing strength from all infected New Yorkers. Mary Jane realizes that, because of her long relationship to Peter, she has some immunity against the disease, gaining spider-powers but not the subsequent mutations. Peter gives Kaine the Stealth Suit (immune to the Queen's sonic attacks) and Kaine goes to attack the Queen. Peter and Mary Jane gather several octobots, outfitting each with several doses of the cure, making them go out to cure people. Peter then connects with the antennae on top of the Empire State Building, curing many people at once, while Mary Jane fights off the spider-like creatures attacking them. Kaine jumps inside the Queen's mouth, killing her by reflecting her sonic scream on her insides. The Jackal uses a disguise to get samples of the Queen's bone marrow for future experiments.

That isn’t to dismiss all complaints by Yale students. If contested claims that black students were turned away from a party due to their skin color are true, for example, that is outrageous. If any discrete group of students is ever discriminated against, or disproportionately victimized by campus crime, or graded more harshly by professors, then of course students should protest and remedies should be implemented.
Lesley Bannatyne and Cindy Ott both write that Anglican colonists in the Southern United States and Catholic colonists in Maryland "recognized All Hallow's Eve in their church calendars",[114][115] although the Puritans of New England maintained strong opposition to the holiday, along with other traditional celebrations of the established Church, including Christmas.[116] Almanacs of the late 18th and early 19th century give no indication that Halloween was widely celebrated in North America.[117] It was not until mass Irish and Scottish immigration in the 19th century that Halloween became a major holiday in North America.[117] Confined to the immigrant communities during the mid-19th century, it was gradually assimilated into mainstream society and by the first decade of the 20th century it was being celebrated coast to coast by people of all social, racial and religious backgrounds.[118] "In Cajun areas, a nocturnal Mass was said in cemeteries on Halloween night. Candles that had been blessed were placed on graves, and families sometimes spent the entire night at the graveside".[119]
In the Clone Saga, a controversial story arc, the long lost Jackal-made copy of Peter Parker returns. For years he was believed to have died after his initial encounter with the real Peter Parker. The clone, who is now calling himself Ben Reilly spent years traveling the world as he knew there was no place for him in New York City again. When his aunt May was believed to be dying, Ben returned to New York and eventually met Peter Parker. At first the two fought and Peter saw Ben as a thread, but later on the two of them worked together, with Ben even taken over as Spider-man for some time when it was believed that Peter had lost his powers. It was also during this time that aunt May seemingly died of old age. Before she passed away, she told Peter that she had known about him being Spider-man for some time now. Years later, it would be revealed that it was not aunt May that had died, but a stand in that was the work of Norman Osborn. Peter remained out of super-heroin for some time, untill his powers seemingly returned and he and the Scarlet Spider fought side by side for some time. The story arc lasted for two years and ended with the death of Ben Reilly at the hands of a returning Norman Osborn who was revealed to be alive and has been pulling strings from the moment he was believed to have died. On that day, Peter felt to have lost a brother. Although Norman Osborn was defeated, it was far from the last thing that was heard from him. With his powers fully returned, Peter resumed his work as the Amazing Spider-Man once again.

Spider-Man became a force for good, from stopping muggings to rescuing workers at a construction site. These heroic activities also gained him positive media attention but he still didn’t want to get back in show business. Even after Shiffman told him they could make millions, Peter chose responsibility over money. His heroism had also earned Spider-Man a certain fan named Flash Thompson. Spider-Man soon encountered another teenager with superpowers of her own and he and Joey Pulaski became friends. However it turned out that Joey was working for The Kingpin and the friends inevitably clashed, resulting in Joey’s defeat and arrest. Although portrayed as just a misguided kid, chronologically Joey Pulaski was the first super powered being Spider-Man had encountered.
Many superheroes have a secret identity, and wear a costume or uniform to help conceal that identity. The costume usually has a logo or symbol as part of its design. Sometimes the costume/uniform incorporates special equipment, tools or technology. For example: Iron Man's armor suit, Captain America's vibranium shield, Spider-Man's web-shooters.   

Jump up ^ Saffel, p. 65, states, "In the battle that followed atop the Brooklyn Bridge (or was it the George Washington Bridge?)...." On page 66, Saffel reprints the panel of The Amazing Spider-Man #121, page 18, in which Spider-Man exclaims, "The George Washington Bridge! It figures Osborn would pick something named after his favorite president. He's got the same sort of hangup for dollar bills!" Saffel states, "The span portrayed...is the GW's more famous cousin, the Brooklyn Bridge. ... To address the contradiction in future reprints of the tale, though, Spider-Man's dialogue was altered so that he's referring to the Brooklyn Bridge. But the original snafu remains as one of the more visible errors in the history of comics."
Enhanced Durability: Woven with durable fabric, Spider-Man's new suit is highly tear resistant, as seen when it received no damage after being dragged along the streets after a van, withstood the strain of Spider-Man holding the Staten Island Ferry together, and when it was unscathed by shards of shattered glass during the Rescue at the Washington Monument. In addition, the suit is waterproof, as showcased when the suit and its technological capabilities were unaffected despite being submerged in water.
In the second volume of Spider-Verse set during the Secret Wars event, Spider-Man Noir found himself in the domain of the Battleworld called Arachnia, where he found and observed Spider-Gwen, Spider-Ham, Spider-Man: India, Spider-UK, and Anya Corazon (neither of them remembering their previous encounter during the original Spider-Verse), though he chose not to reveal himself to them until they crashed into one of his operations.[12]
It is claimed that in the Middle Ages, churches that were too poor to display the relics of martyred saints at Allhallowtide let parishioners dress up as saints instead.[92][93] Some Christians continue to observe this custom at Halloween today.[94] Lesley Bannatyne believes this could have been a Christianization of an earlier pagan custom.[95] While souling, Christians would carry with them "lanterns made of hollowed-out turnips".[96] It has been suggested that the carved jack-o'-lantern, a popular symbol of Halloween, originally represented the souls of the dead.[97] On Halloween, in medieval Europe, fires served a dual purpose, being lit to guide returning souls to the homes of their families, as well as to deflect demons from haunting sincere Christian folk.[98][99] Households in Austria, England and Ireland often had "candles burning in every room to guide the souls back to visit their earthly homes". These were known as "soul lights".[100][101][102] Many Christians in mainland Europe, especially in France, believed "that once a year, on Hallowe'en, the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival" known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[103] Christopher Allmand and Rosamond McKitterick write in The New Cambridge Medieval History that "Christians were moved by the sight of the Infant Jesus playing on his mother's knee; their hearts were touched by the Pietà; and patron saints reassured them by their presence. But, all the while, the danse macabre urged them not to forget the end of all earthly things."[104] This danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and may have been the origin of modern-day Halloween costume parties.[96][105][93][106]
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