While I don’t know explicitly where the idea comes from, it seems to me that there are a few interesting threads that could be looked at. First, many of the original superhero creators were immigrants or children of immigrants — Americans but not quite like other Americans. Much has been made of the “Jewishness” of Superman — an immigrant from an Old World whose geeky, mild-mannered, weakling exterior hides his inner superiority to everyone around him, who even chose an American name to hide his secret foreign-sounding one. A second thread is the rise of teen culture in the US, and the development of the gender gap as the necessity for greater and greater independence became a factor in child-rearing. FInally, I think it bears looking at the problems of urban living which, at the beginning of the 20th century, had become the main environment for most Americans. Especially important in this connection is the anonymity afforded by urban living and the alientation — call it the Walter Mitty effect — leading people to desperately wish for a way to prove themselves worthy and *noticable*.
Enhanced Reconnaissance Mode: This mode allows Spider-Man's hearing and optics to be enhanced. It enables both X-Ray and infrared vision to see through solid objects and locate his target. It also allows for enhanced audio reception capabilities to the point that he can eavesdrop on conversations from yards away. It also corresponds to the suit's database, allowing for data retrieval about certain individuals and their backgrounds.
Betty Brant: Betty takes over her mother's former position as Daily Bugle secretary after she dies. Peter dates Betty Brant for a while, but they break up due to her blaming Spider-Man for the death of her brother. She later marries Daily Bugle reporter Ned Leeds, although she briefly gets back with Peter after the breakdown of her marriage. Despite this, both Betty and Peter maintain a close friendship.

“First published in 1930, Gladiator is the tale of Hugo Danner, a man endowed from birth with extraordinary strength and speed. But Danner is no altruist. He spends his life trying to cope with his abilities, becoming a sports hero in college, later a sideshow act, a war hero, never truly finding peace with himself. The character of Danner inspired both Superman’s creators, and Lester Dent’s Doc Savage. But Wylie, an editor with the New Yorker, sought to develop more than a pulp hero. His Gladiator provides surprising insights into the difficulties suffered by the truly gifted when born in our midst.”

The practice may have originated in a Celtic festival, held on 31 October–1 November, to mark the beginning of winter. It was called Samhain in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, and Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Cornwall and Brittany. The festival is believed to have pre-Christian roots. After the Christianization of Ireland in the 5th century, some of these customs may have been retained in the Christian observance of All Hallows' Eve in that region—which continued to be called Samhain/Calan Gaeaf—blending the traditions of their ancestors with Christian ones.[2][3] It was seen as a liminal time, when the spirits or fairies (the Aos Sí), and the souls of the dead, could more easily come into our world.[4] It was believed that the Aos Sí needed to be propitiated to ensure that the people and their livestock survived the winter.

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