After escaping through the Bifröst, the Hulk crash-lands into the Sanctum Sanctorum before reverting to his alter ego Bruce Banner. After being discovered by the Sanctorum's guardian Doctor Strange and his assistant Wong, he warns them that Thanos and his forces are coming to Earth to find the remaining Infinity Stones as part of plan to use the stone's combined power in conjunction with the Infinity Gauntlet to kill half of all life in the universe. In response to Bruce's warning, Doctor Strange calls Bruce's former teammate Iron Man the Sanctorum in order to get his assistance in thwarting Thanos' plan. Shortly after Iron Man arrives, Thanos' children Maw and Obsidian arrive to retrieve the Time Stone located inside amulet around Doctor Strange's neck. The ensuing battle draws the attention of Iron Man's protégé Spider-Man who assists his mentor and Doctor Strange in fighting off the alien invaders. After subduing their target, Maw and Obsidian retreat with back to their ship where Maw attempts to remove the stone from the Eye of Agamotto, but an enchantment placed on the amulet prevents Maw from removing the Time Stone. Iron Man and Spider-Man decide to pursue Maw's spaceship to rescue their comrade while Wong stays behind to guard the Sanctorum and Bruce leaves to contact Steve Rogers for help.
Comics Week 33, 2017 2017 2017, October Modern-Age Spider-Men II Vol 1 T+ (13 and up) Axel Alonso/Editor-in-Chief Sara Pichelli/Cover Artist Justin Ponsor/Cover Artist Brian Michael Bendis/Writer Sara Pichelli/Penciler Sara Pichelli/Inker Elisabetta D'Amico/Inker Justin Ponsor/Colourist Cory Petit/Letterer Nick Lowe/Editor Allison Stock/Editor Kathleen Wisneski/Editor Devin Lewis/Editor Miles Morales (Earth-1610)/Quotes Miles Morales (Earth-1610)/Appearances Peter Parker (Earth-616)/Appearances Barbara Rodriguez (Earth-616)/Appearances Alias Investigations (Earth-616)/Appearances Jessica Jones (Earth-616)/Appearances Tony Masters (Earth-616)/Appearances Miles Morales (Earth-616)/Appearances Yahweh (Earth-616)/Invocations Victor von Doom (Earth-616)/Mentions New York City Police Department (Earth-616)/Appearances Stark Industries (Earth-616)/Mentions Strategic Homeland Intervention, Enforcement and Logistics Division (Earth-616)/Mentions Judge (Earth-1610)/Mentions Luke Cage (Earth-616)/Mentions Alison Blaire (Earth-616)/Appearances Hand (Earth-616)/Appearances Jessica Drew (Earth-616)/Appearances Jonathan Powers (Earth-616)/Appearances Frederick Dukes (Earth-616)/Appearances Lunella Lafayette (Earth-616)/Appearances Devil Dinosaur (Earth-78411)/Appearances Ophelia Sarkissian (Earth-616)/Appearances Quentin Beck (Earth-616)/Mentions Sasheer (Earth-616)/Appearances Homo sapiens/Appearances Watchers/Mentions Homo superior/Appearances Human-Inhuman Hybrids/Appearances Devil Beasts/Appearances Earth-616/Appearances Earth/Appearances United States of America/Appearances New York State/Appearances New York City/Appearances Manhattan/Appearances Alias Investigations Office/Appearances Lower East Side/Appearances Brooklyn/Appearances Brooklyn Visions Academy/Appearances Midtown High School/Mentions Michigan/Minor Appearances Detroit/Minor Appearances Spider-Man's Suit/Appearances Web-Shooters/Appearances Spider-Woman's Suit/Appearances Hulk Plug-In/Minor Appearances

When the Guardians of the Galaxy traveled to the 20th century on a mission to destroy the Badoon, the Uni-Power possessed a Badoon worker named L'Matto in order to prevent the planned genocide. L'Matto's newfound knowledge was able to keep the Guardians from attacking but the Brother Royal then used the Badoon Captain Universe as his champion in a gladiatorial challenge which he had coerced the Guardians into accepting. L'Matto easily overpowered Charlie-27 and was about to kill him when Vance Astro and Dr. Strange arrived and joined in the battle, with Nikki and Talon pitching in as well. Despite this, it was not until Aleta (who had become the new Starhawk) arrived and attacked alongside Dr. Strange that L'Matto was finally defeated, enabling Strange to exorcise the Uni-Power which L'Matto had abused and return it to Earth.[13]


Eddie J. Smith, in his book Halloween, Hallowed is Thy Name, offers a religious perspective to the wearing of costumes on All Hallows' Eve, suggesting that by dressing up as creatures "who at one time caused us to fear and tremble", people are able to poke fun at Satan "whose kingdom has been plundered by our Saviour". Images of skeletons and the dead are traditional decorations used as memento mori.[159][160]

Jump up ^ Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 29. ISBN 978-0756692360. While he wouldn't have the same staying power as many other Stan Lee/Steve Ditko creations, the Crime Master gave villainy a good shot in this first half of a two-part Spider-Man adventure.
During the Spider-Verse storyline which featured Spider-Men from various alternate realities, Spider-Man Noir starred in one-shot comic Edge of Spider-Verse #1, at the end of which he was recruited by The Superior Spider-Man into his army of Spiders.[9] He was also featured prominently in Spider-Verse Team-Up #1, alongside a six-armed Spider-Man.[10] In Spider-Woman Vol. 5 #1, Spider-Man Noir found himself defending the lives of Silk and Spider-Woman (Jessica Drew) and got wounded in the process, after which he was returned to his home reality to heal and recuperate.[11]
In 1992, Marvel revealed that Northstar, a member of the Canadian mutant superhero team Alpha Flight, was homosexual, after years of implication.[58] This ended a long-standing editorial mandate that there would be no homosexual characters in Marvel comics.[59] Although some minor secondary characters in DC Comics' mature-audience 1980s miniseries Watchmen were gay, and the reformed supervillain Pied Piper came out to Wally West in an issue of The Flash in 1991, Northstar is considered to be the first openly gay superhero appearing in mainstream comic books. From the mid-2000s onward, several established Marvel and DC comics characters (or a variant version of the pre-existing character) were outed or reintroduced as LGBT individuals by both publishers. Examples include the Mikaal Tomas incarnation of Starman in 1998; Colossus in the Ultimate X-Men series; Renee Montoya in DC's Gotham Central series in 2003; the Kate Kane incarnation of Batwoman in 2006; Rictor and Shatterstar in an issue of X-Factor in 2009; the Golden Age Green Lantern Alan Scott is reimagined as openly gay following The New 52 reboot in 2011;[60][61] and in 2015, a younger time displaced version of Iceman in an issue of All-New X-Men.[62]
This collection of costumes for men is sure have exactly what you're looking for, whether you're shopping for yourself or for others, for Halloween or other events. Lots of the costumes allow you to choose a size that fits you best, but be warned! Halloween costumes are always smaller than you might expect, and going a size up is safer than going a size down – it's always easier to take items in then let them out, and there's only so much you can do with costume fabric. There are also plus sizes for bigger lads, so it's easy to get something that will fit. There are lots of ways to make costume shopping more affordable, too. 
Spider-Man once again featured as a playable fighter in the 2011 release of Marvel vs. Capcom 3: Fate of Two Worlds and its updated release of Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3 and versions of the game would be released on the PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita and Xbox 360. October 2011 also saw the release of the next Spider-Man video game adventure with Spider-Man: Edge of Time, developed by Activision and Beenox, the latter being given free reign after the success of Shattered Dimensions, which bears a similar gameplay concept. The game involves Peter Parker and his future counterpart Miguel O'Hara. New villain created for the game, Walker Sloan, has created a time machine in order to go back in time and start Alchemex, the company which Miguel works for, now was established in his own views in the seventies. Miguel proceeds to stop him but is caught in the portal after Sloan has entered and somehow becomes a "viewer" in the events. This gives him the ability to communicate with Peter Parker, who now works for Alechemex in this time altered universe, and everything he does directly affects the year 2099. Both briefly navigate their own timelines until circumstances force them to switch, now residing in timelines alien to them they traverse obstacles in order to get home through the temporal portal and solve the dystopian effects of the timeline corruption. The two work together to prevent Peter's death at the hands of Anti-Venom, save Mary Jane from multiple danger, and even take on the CEO of Alchemex. Currently Beenox has been given rights to the creation of all future Spider-Man games.

Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a common and powerful programming paradigm that heavily incorporates ideas of abstraction. Abstraction allows programmers to write code that shows the essential features of a piece of software without including the background details. Some common object-oriented programming languages include Python, Java, Ruby, and C++. Object-oriented programming languages often use classes, which group objects, attributes, and methods together for user-friendly and modular programming.

The armor was then coated with a black latex material to dampen Bruce's heat signature, making him difficult to detect with night-vision equipment. Made of a graphite material, the cowl acts as a protective helmet. The cowl's Kevlar lining is supposed to be bulletproof. A manufacturing defect in the graphite used in the production of the first shipment of the cowl's components made its outer shell incapable of withstanding blunt trauma (a flaw Alfred demonstrated to Bruce Wayne using a baseball bat). Batman apparently took on Falcone and his henchmen at the docks with the defective helmet. The second shipment was supposed to fix this problem. An advanced eavesdropping device is concealed within the cowl's right ear and enables Batman to listen in on conversations from a distance.
Sometimes mutant powers are really just the thing to bring a group together, and if your gang is ready to put their super human abilities to work, then there’s only one team for you: The X-Men! Storm can command the team while Cyclops keeps opponents at bay with his concussive optic blast. If you have a quick-witted member of your group, a Deadpool Halloween costume is sure to turn them into the crass and sharp-tongued Wade Wilson. Up the ante by getting a friend to go in a Wolverine costume, and you’ll have one mutant posse that no villain is going to want to tangle with. We heard Wolvie’s usually hungry though, so you’re going to want to bring plenty of snacks. “Hey. Pass the chip dip, bub!”
Enter the archfiend Doc Ock, armed with a lethal invention powerful enough to destroy half the city. If Spider-Man tries to stop Doc Ock, he’ll be placing the lives of those closest to him in mortal danger. If he doesn’t, it could be the end of the Big Apple. With millions of lives hanging in the balance, high about Manhattan’s glittering skyline, Spider-Man confronts his destiny, his fiercest enemy, and himself.
I actually do think The Incredibles explored this issue in a subtle way; the fact that the basis of Syndrome’s psychosis is that he was fixated on one element of the superhero making a person a “super” - special powers or abilities. That was evidenced in his plot to destory the ideas of “supers” by making everyone “super” eventually; as if giving everyone special powers is all it would take to eliminate the idea of heroes.

Spider-Man is a fictional superhero created by writer-editor Stan Lee and writer-artist Steve Ditko. He first appeared in the anthology comic book Amazing Fantasy #15 (August 1962) in the Silver Age of Comic Books. He appears in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, as well as in a number of movies, television shows, and video game adaptations set in the Marvel Universe. In the stories, Spider-Man is the alias of Peter Parker, an orphan raised by his Aunt May and Uncle Ben in New York City after his parents Richard and Mary Parker were killed in a plane crash. Lee and Ditko had the character deal with the struggles of adolescence and financial issues, and accompanied him with many supporting characters, such as J. Jonah Jameson, Flash Thompson, Harry Osborn, romantic interests Gwen Stacy and Mary Jane Watson, and foes such as Doctor Octopus, Green Goblin and Venom. His origin story has him acquiring spider-related abilities after a bite from a radioactive spider; these include clinging to surfaces, shooting spider-webs from wrist-mounted devices, and detecting danger with his "spider-sense".
Jump up ^ Roberts, Brian K. (1987). The Making of the English Village: A Study in Historical Geography. Longman Scientific & Technical. ISBN 9780582301436. Archived from the original on 23 April 2016. Retrieved 14 December 2015. Time out of time', when the barriers between this world and the next were down, the dead returned from the grave, and gods and strangers from the underworld walked abroad was a twice- yearly reality, on dates Christianised as All Hallows' Eve and All Hallows' Day.
The Batsuit has been repeatedly updated in order to reflect advances in technology. Originally the costume contained no protective armor since the creative talent felt that it made Batman seem too powerful to see him shrug off bullet hits. However, the real world advent of various forms of personal protective materials like Kevlar and the realization that being shot while wearing such protection still should be avoided, has led to the costume being re-imagined with varying forms of bulletproof protection which employs the aforementioned use of the suit's chest symbol to lure shots at the armor's strongest point. Despite the armor, Batman almost always evades gunfire and is very rarely actually shot. After recovering from his spinal cord injury (the result of Bane's attack), Batman reinforced the armor with a material to dampen shocks and impact, along with a spinal brace, to protect himself from such abuse.
'What if Spider-Man Had Kept His Six Arms?' explores what would have happened if Morbius was eaten by sharks and never made it to Connors Lab with a cure. Ultimately the arm mutation is irreversible, but it proves an advantage and he defeats most of his villains easily. Spider-Man even becomes a spokesman for the physically challenged, and inspires all to rise to their true potential. This Spider-Man appears in Spider-Verse and is killed by Daemos.[citation needed]
Similar to a grappling hook, the line launching gun uses a strong clamp attached to a high-tensil wire for scaling surfaces and/or traversing gaps. It can be recovered by releasing the clamp and rewinding the cable. It was based from one that is designed as compact climbing gear for commando units. It is propelled with compressed air, and works with a magnetic grappling iron. The thin climbing cable was tested on a load-carrying capacity of 350 lbs. The line can be attached to a reel in the buckle in the utility harness, but this was only used to escape after being defeated by the Scarecow in The Narrows.
During the Abraxas Saga,[28][29] a team of Avengers-esque super heroes called the Law Enforcement Squad appeared in Earth-616. They were headed by an intelligent version of the Hulk who was not Bruce Banner. Joining this strange version of the behemoth were the World War II-era heroes Red Raven, Bucky, Namora and The Whizzer (Bob Frank). Other members included a heroic version of the Spider-Man villain The Rose, Doctor Druid, Living Lightning, the Shroud and a male Captain Universe.[volume & issue needed] (The membership of the Law Enforcement Squad paralleled the membership of DC Comics' Justice Society of America.[original research?] Captain Universe was the equivalent of DC's Starman.[original research?])
Spidercide later betrayed Jackal to Scrier (who was eventually revealed to be an operative of a cult of Scriers working with Norman Osborn). Scrier also removed Spidercide's clone degeneration factor and the Jackal was incapable of triggering his degeneration like he had done with fellow clone Jack. He was killed when falling off the Daily Bugle after it was revealed that the Jackal had deceived him. Although apparently dead, he was put into a stasis chamber as a precaution.[4]
As with Spider-Man, the villains' powers originate with scientific accidents or the misuse of scientific technology and also tend to have animal-themed costumes or powers (Vulture, Doctor Octopus, Beetle, Lizard, Rhino, Scorpion, Jackal and Black Cat). There also are supervillains with the powers over the elements (Sandman, Shocker, Electro, Molten Man and Hydro-Man), some that are horror-themed (the Goblins, Morbius, Morlun, and the Symbiotes) some that are crime lords (Kingpin, Tinkerer, Tombstone, Hammerhead, Silvermane and Mister Negative),[1] and some that are masters of trickery (Chameleon and Mysterio).[2] These villains oftentimes form teams such as the Sinister Six to oppose the superhero.
The Hero-Maker is crafting station available in the mod. First appearing in version 2.0 as a way to smelt ores, it was redesigned in version 4.0 to be used as a crafting table. Through the Hero Maker, the player can create the suits for various superheroes, including Superman, Batman, Captain America and Thor. However, in version 5.0, it was removed in favor of the Suit Assembly Unit.
Other related characters exist in alternative versions of the Marvel Universe called the Multiverse. These characters originally appeared in their own continuity but later on crossed over with the mainstream Spider-Man family. In 2015 all the alternate comic book universes were destroyed and only a few characters joined together with Earth-616 characters in its own universe including various Spider-Men.
"Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF" is a fundraising program to support UNICEF,[84] a United Nations Programme that provides humanitarian aid to children in developing countries. Started as a local event in a Northeast Philadelphia neighborhood in 1950 and expanded nationally in 1952, the program involves the distribution of small boxes by schools (or in modern times, corporate sponsors like Hallmark, at their licensed stores) to trick-or-treaters, in which they can solicit small-change donations from the houses they visit. It is estimated that children have collected more than $118 million for UNICEF since its inception. In Canada, in 2006, UNICEF decided to discontinue their Halloween collection boxes, citing safety and administrative concerns; after consultation with schools, they instead redesigned the program.[161][162]
Many new openly gay, lesbian and bisexual characters have since emerged in superhero fiction, such as Gen¹³'s Rainmaker, Apollo and Midnighter of The Authority, and Wiccan and Hulkling of the Young Avengers. Notable transgender or gender bending characters are fewer in number by comparison: the alter ego of superheroine Zsazsa Zaturnnah, a seminal character in Philippine popular culture,[63] is an effeminate gay man who transforms into a female superhuman after ingesting a magical stone. Desire from Neil Gaiman's The Sandman series and Xavin from the Runaways are both characters who could (and often) change their gender at will. Alysia Yeoh, a supporting character created by writer Gail Simone for the Batgirl ongoing series published by DC Comics, received substantial media attention in 2011 for being the first major transgender character written in a contemporary context in a mainstream American comic book.[64]
Sheikh Idris Palmer, author of A Brief Illustrated Guide to Understanding Islam, has argued that Muslims should not participate in Halloween, stating that "participation in Halloween is worse than participation in Christmas, Easter, ... it is more sinful than congratulating the Christians for their prostration to the crucifix".[231] Javed Memon, a Muslim writer, has disagreed, saying that his "daughter dressing up like a British telephone booth will not destroy her faith as a Muslim".[232]

As different artists have taken over the responsibility of drawing the character, the details of the suit have changed considerably. The original incarnation of the cape was a wing-like structure inspired by drawings by Leonardo da Vinci. This eventually evolved into a more cape-like design of varying length. Some artists draw the cape with protrusions on the shoulders, likely representing the "thumb" part of a bat's wing, though this is not a consistent addition. The cape is occasionally depicted as bulletproof.The cape varies according to the current writer, sometimes being depicted as bulletproof and fire resistant, and other times being nothing more than simple fabric that tears easily and sustains constant damage and is continuously replaced.
Flash Thompson[106] Amazing Fantasy #15 (August 1962) A sometimes enemy of Peter Parker instead of Spider-Man. Flash's most common depiction is a high school bully of Parker commonly dubbing him "Puny Parker". Despite how he treats Parker he happens to be one of Spider-Man's biggest fans. Later on Flash would be depicted as being good friends to Peter instead. In The Amazing Spider-Man #654, Flash Thompson becomes "Agent Venom"[107]

Comics Week 33, 2017 2017 2017, October Modern-Age Spider-Men II Vol 1 T+ (13 and up) Axel Alonso/Editor-in-Chief Sara Pichelli/Cover Artist Justin Ponsor/Cover Artist Brian Michael Bendis/Writer Sara Pichelli/Penciler Sara Pichelli/Inker Elisabetta D'Amico/Inker Justin Ponsor/Colourist Cory Petit/Letterer Nick Lowe/Editor Allison Stock/Editor Kathleen Wisneski/Editor Devin Lewis/Editor Miles Morales (Earth-1610)/Quotes Miles Morales (Earth-1610)/Appearances Peter Parker (Earth-616)/Appearances Barbara Rodriguez (Earth-616)/Appearances Alias Investigations (Earth-616)/Appearances Jessica Jones (Earth-616)/Appearances Tony Masters (Earth-616)/Appearances Miles Morales (Earth-616)/Appearances Yahweh (Earth-616)/Invocations Victor von Doom (Earth-616)/Mentions New York City Police Department (Earth-616)/Appearances Stark Industries (Earth-616)/Mentions Strategic Homeland Intervention, Enforcement and Logistics Division (Earth-616)/Mentions Judge (Earth-1610)/Mentions Luke Cage (Earth-616)/Mentions Alison Blaire (Earth-616)/Appearances Hand (Earth-616)/Appearances Jessica Drew (Earth-616)/Appearances Jonathan Powers (Earth-616)/Appearances Frederick Dukes (Earth-616)/Appearances Lunella Lafayette (Earth-616)/Appearances Devil Dinosaur (Earth-78411)/Appearances Ophelia Sarkissian (Earth-616)/Appearances Quentin Beck (Earth-616)/Mentions Sasheer (Earth-616)/Appearances Homo sapiens/Appearances Watchers/Mentions Homo superior/Appearances Human-Inhuman Hybrids/Appearances Devil Beasts/Appearances Earth-616/Appearances Earth/Appearances United States of America/Appearances New York State/Appearances New York City/Appearances Manhattan/Appearances Alias Investigations Office/Appearances Lower East Side/Appearances Brooklyn/Appearances Brooklyn Visions Academy/Appearances Midtown High School/Mentions Michigan/Minor Appearances Detroit/Minor Appearances Spider-Man's Suit/Appearances Web-Shooters/Appearances Spider-Woman's Suit/Appearances Hulk Plug-In/Minor Appearances


Spider-Man Noir or just Spider-Man (Peter Parker) is a fictional character, a superhero appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. This alternate version of Spider-Man is a darker take on Spider-Man and the mythos is set in 1933 – during the Great Depression and is a part of the Marvel Noir universe. An inexperienced but idealistic apprentice of a respected yet troubled reporter, Peter Parker is accidentally bitten by an illegally imported and highly-venomous spider, while secretly investigating a smuggling ring of ancient spider statues. Instead of killing him, the bite gave him super-human abilities, similar to that of a spider. Taking advantage of his new abilities, Parker begins to wage a one-man war against the criminal underworld in New York City as a brutal and feared vigilante, known as the "Spider-Man", partly to avenge the deaths of his uncle Ben Parker and his mentor: Ben Urich, at the hands of the city's major crime lord: Norman Osborn.
Enter the archfiend Doc Ock, armed with a lethal invention powerful enough to destroy half the city. If Spider-Man tries to stop Doc Ock, he’ll be placing the lives of those closest to him in mortal danger. If he doesn’t, it could be the end of the Big Apple. With millions of lives hanging in the balance, high about Manhattan’s glittering skyline, Spider-Man confronts his destiny, his fiercest enemy, and himself.

^ Not counting any other character in the mainstream Marvel Universe with that name. Only outside of the mainstream Spider-Man comics or in other media is there other Spider-Man villains (that isn't named Mac Gargan) that are antagonists of Spider-Man.[151][152][153] Gargan is cited to be the fourth who is called that in the comic books but is the most iconic villain with that name.[33]
Scott Malkinson could've been an ordinary child, but in a freak accident his mom farted on him during childbirth which gave him diabetes. Rather than dwelling on his misfortune, Captain Diabetes wields his sugary illness as a source of power that his enemies cannot overcome. Captain Diabetes is a Brutalist archetype who combines punishing melee knockback moves with an annoying desire to hang out.
How long can any man fight the darkness before he finds it in himself? Peter Parker has finally managed to strike a balance between his devotion to M.J. and his duties as a Super Hero. But there is a storm brewing on the horizon. When his suit suddenly changes, turning jet-black and enhancing his powers, it transforms Peter as well, bringing out the dark, vengeful side of his personality that he is struggling to control. Under the influence of the suit, Peter becomes overconfident and starts to neglect the people who care about him most. Forced to choose between the seductive power of the new suit and the compassionate hero he used to be, Peter must overcome his personal demons as two of the most feared villains yet -- Sandman and Venom -- gather unparalleled power and a thirst for retribution to threaten Peter and everyone he loves.
"Costume" often refers to a particular style of clothing worn to portray the wearer as a character or type of character at a social event in a theatrical performance on the stage or in film or television. In combination with other aspects of stagecraft, theatrical costumes can help actors portray characters' and their contexts as well as communicate information about the historical period/era, geographic location and time of day, season or weather of the theatrical performance. Some stylized theatrical costumes, such as Harlequin and Pantaloon in the Commedia dell'arte, exaggerate an aspect of a character.
The earliest superhero I could find reference to was Mandrake the Magician, who debuted in 1934, four years before Superman, who was probably the first popular superhero. Mandrake’s super power was his ability to “make people believe anything, simply by gesturing hypnotically”. Does anyone out there know of any superheroes who made an earlier media appearance?
The feast of All Hallows', on its current date in the Western Church, may be traced to Pope Gregory III's (731–741) founding of an oratory in St Peter's for the relics "of the holy apostles and of all saints, martyrs and confessors".[76][77] In 835, All Hallows' Day was officially switched to 1 November, the same date as Samhain, at the behest of Pope Gregory IV.[78] Some suggest this was due to Celtic influence, while others suggest it was a Germanic idea,[78] although it is claimed that both Germanic and Celtic-speaking peoples commemorated the dead at the beginning of winter.[79] They may have seen it as the most fitting time to do so, as it is a time of 'dying' in nature.[78][79] It is also suggested that the change was made on the "practical grounds that Rome in summer could not accommodate the great number of pilgrims who flocked to it", and perhaps because of public health considerations regarding Roman Fever – a disease that claimed a number of lives during the sultry summers of the region.[80]
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