Batman stands tall above Gotham City, and often times he has the weight of the entire world on his shoulders. Does he have what it takes to defeat The Joker ? Bane? Doomsday? When your little one takes the mantle of The Dark Knight, there will be no need to fret over which villain is threatening the neighborhood, because we’re sure he’ll be able to just focus on his Halloween party and all of the trick-or-treating fun. But when it’s time to strike a pose and show the world that he’s The Bat, you’re going to want to get the picture just right. A little breeze will make his cape look epic, and when he has his fists on his hips, the molded effect of this premier costume really stands out. A stern face will project his newfound power, but if he happens to crack a smile, that photo will look just as epic.
Hundreds of Yale students have now signed an open letter to Erika Christakis that is alarming in its own right, not least because it is so poorly reasoned. “Your email equates old traditions of using harmful stereotypes and tropes to further degrade marginalized people, to preschoolers playing make believe,” the letter inaccurately summarizes. “This both trivializes the harm done by these tropes and infantilizes the student body to which the request was made.” Up is down. The person saying that adult men and women should work Halloween out among themselves is accused of infantilizing them. “You fail to distinguish the difference between cosplaying fictional characters and misrepresenting actual groups of people,” the letter continues, though Erika Christakis specifically wrote in her Halloween email, “I suppose we could agree that there is a difference between fantasizing about an individual character vs. appropriating a culture, wholesale, the latter of which could be seen as (tacky)(offensive)(jejeune)(hurtful), take your pick.”
In 1962, Marvel Comics editor and head writer Stan Lee was looking for a new superhero idea. He decided to create Spider-Man as a character with whom teens could identify, as there was a recent surge in teenage demand for comics. Lee was supposedly inspired for the concept of Spider-Man after observing a spider climb up a wall. Lee had to convince publisher Martin Goodman to introduce Spider-Man in the last issue of the canceled series Amazing Adult Fantasy, which was renamed Amazing Fantasy for that issue (#15, Aug. 1962). Lee then approached legendary artist Jack Kirby for an initial character design. However Lee was dissatisfied with Kirby’s attempt as the character turned out to be too heroic and Spider-Man was supposed to be a teenage boy. Lee then turned to Steve Ditko who developed the now iconic look of Spider-Man.
Similar to a grappling hook, the line launching gun uses a strong clamp attached to a high-tensil wire for scaling surfaces and/or traversing gaps. It can be recovered by releasing the clamp and rewinding the cable. It was based from one that is designed as compact climbing gear for commando units. It is propelled with compressed air, and works with a magnetic grappling iron. The thin climbing cable was tested on a load-carrying capacity of 350 lbs. The line can be attached to a reel in the buckle in the utility harness, but this was only used to escape after being defeated by the Scarecow in The Narrows.
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Catwoman has no shame about her preferred choice of action, stealing and being a top notch catburglar are at the top of her list. But when the times call for a hero, she has no problem standing side-by-side with Batman to team up and defeat the baddies. When she’s on the prowl for precious jewels, though, is sure to be the most opportune time for a quick picture. Once she takes out the vital controls of the security system, she’ll have no problem slipping into the joint and lining her pockets with a little extra cash or whatever she can find in the safety deposit box. Have her show her claws for the picture, and she can smile or look serious—either way this picture is going to be one to remember!
I actually do think The Incredibles explored this issue in a subtle way; the fact that the basis of Syndrome’s psychosis is that he was fixated on one element of the superhero making a person a “super” - special powers or abilities. That was evidenced in his plot to destory the ideas of “supers” by making everyone “super” eventually; as if giving everyone special powers is all it would take to eliminate the idea of heroes.
The practice may have originated in a Celtic festival, held on 31 October–1 November, to mark the beginning of winter. It was called Samhain in Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man, and Calan Gaeaf in Wales, Cornwall and Brittany. The festival is believed to have pre-Christian roots. After the Christianization of Ireland in the 5th century, some of these customs may have been retained in the Christian observance of All Hallows' Eve in that region—which continued to be called Samhain/Calan Gaeaf—blending the traditions of their ancestors with Christian ones.[2][3] It was seen as a liminal time, when the spirits or fairies (the Aos Sí), and the souls of the dead, could more easily come into our world.[4] It was believed that the Aos Sí needed to be propitiated to ensure that the people and their livestock survived the winter.
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