Spider-Man Noir appears in Ultimate Spider-Man, voiced by Milo Ventimiglia. In the episode "The Spider-Verse: Part 2", after Green Goblin appears on the Noir reality to collect the DNA of that universe Spider-Man, he is confronted by both the "Noir" and the "Ultimate" Spider-Man, who had followed the Goblin to this universe. However, after rejecting an alliance proposed by his counterpart, Noir is forced to work together with him after the Green Goblin hijacks an airship to draw out Spider-Man Noir, taking a group of civilians present hostage, including Mary Jane. While the Ultimate Spider-Man is saving the hostages, Spider-Man Noir fights the Goblin on his own, but the Goblin manage to take the DNA of a distracted Spider-Man Noir and then departs. Spider-Man Noir admits to both Ultimate Spider-Man and Mary Jane that he should drop the "lone wolf" act, and as his counterpart follows the Goblin to another dimension, the two Spider-Men depart as friends. Spider-Man Noir later returns In "The Spider-Verse: Part 4", summoned by "Ultimate" Spider-Man along with other Spider-Man counterparts to form a team known as the Web-Warriors in order to combat the Green Goblin and Electro. After the villains are defeated, the Web-Warriors return to their respective dimensions. Spider-Man Noir makes a cameo in the fourth season episode "Miles from Home".
Many superheroes have a secret identity, and wear a costume or uniform to help conceal that identity. The costume usually has a logo or symbol as part of its design. Sometimes the costume/uniform incorporates special equipment, tools or technology. For example: Iron Man's armor suit, Captain America's vibranium shield, Spider-Man's web-shooters.   
The Spider-Mobile would first appear in The Amazing Spider-Man #130 in 1974. Spider-Man would be approached by Corona Motors who offers him a non-polluting vehicle in which they wanted him to promote. However, Peter turned it down and approaches his friend Johnny Storm to create their own vehicle. They customized a dune buggy to have web-launchers and a spider-signal. It could also be disguised as a regular car so that no one would suspect that he was Spider-Man. Spider-Man would put it into action but it is quickly wrecked because Mysterio tricked Peter into driving it off a pier. Later the Tinkerer would be able to recover the wrecked dune buggy and re-modify it to be able to drive up walls and to drive itself. The Tinkerer sent it to fight Spider-Man, in which he would barely defeat his own car.

The cape and cowl of the suits are prominently displayed as Bruce Wayne's spiritual presence in proceedings after the Final Crisis. With the cape and cowl of the clone being displayed alongside the other batsuits as a memorial that Richard Grayson would constantly return to and ultimately forge his own decision to become the new Batman, while the cape and cowl of Bruce misplaced in time would become a holy relic of the Miagani Tribe from the prehistoric era onwards, enshrined in the caverns that would eventually become the Batcave.

During her career, she had a role in the rebirth of two of Spider-Man's old foes during the Rose's efforts to gain extra muscle: she was the one who threw the switch of the electric chair which gave Electro his powers back, and helped set up the theft of Doctor Octopus' corpse for re-animation from the Hand. She also appears in Loners as an assassin smuggling MGH.[113][114][115][116]
A superhero (sometimes rendered super-hero or super hero or Super) is a type of heroic stock character, usually possessing supernatural or superhuman powers, who is dedicated to fighting the evil of their universe, protecting the public, and usually battling supervillains. A female superhero is sometimes called a superheroine (also rendered super-heroine or super heroine), although the word superhero is commonly used for females also. Superhero fiction is the genre of fiction that is centered on such characters, especially in American comic book and films since the 1930s.
Writers and artists over the years have established a rogues gallery of supervillains to face Spider-Man. In comics and in other media. As with the hero, the majority of the villains' powers originate with scientific accidents or the misuse of scientific technology, and many have animal-themed costumes or powers.[note 6] Examples are listed down below in the ordering of their original chronological appearance:      Indicates a group.
It was a basic convention of comic books at the time of Batman's creation that black needed a highlight color (usually blue) in order to show detail and give the illusion of three-dimensionality. Over time, the initial blue highlight spread out over the previously black cape and cowl to become the dominant color. Thus artists renditions depict the costume as black and gray or blue and gray.
In Marvel Zombies Return Spider-Man is teleported to a new world, where he consumes and infects the Sinister Six (except for Sandman). As his cosmic abilities did not come with him, and his webshooters have dried up, the zombified superhero is forced to make do with his own veins and arteries. Following the death of the Spider-Man of this universe (killed by Sandman in revenge for the deaths of the Sinister Six)[16] the zombie Spider-Man works on developing a cure for the plague with the aid of the Kitty Pryde of this universe, using nanites and the blood of this world's Wolverine.[17] With the zombie Giant-Man having followed Spider-Man to this new reality, Spider-Man resolves to stop Giant-Man.[18] Spider-Man releases the Sandman, now infused with nanites, and wipes out every zombie hero and villain. Zombie Spider-Man dies from being exposed to his own weapon.[volume & issue needed]
In the Clone Saga, a controversial story arc, the long lost Jackal-made copy of Peter Parker returns. For years he was believed to have died after his initial encounter with the real Peter Parker. The clone, who is now calling himself Ben Reilly spent years traveling the world as he knew there was no place for him in New York City again. When his aunt May was believed to be dying, Ben returned to New York and eventually met Peter Parker. At first the two fought and Peter saw Ben as a thread, but later on the two of them worked together, with Ben even taken over as Spider-man for some time when it was believed that Peter had lost his powers. It was also during this time that aunt May seemingly died of old age. Before she passed away, she told Peter that she had known about him being Spider-man for some time now. Years later, it would be revealed that it was not aunt May that had died, but a stand in that was the work of Norman Osborn. Peter remained out of super-heroin for some time, untill his powers seemingly returned and he and the Scarlet Spider fought side by side for some time. The story arc lasted for two years and ended with the death of Ben Reilly at the hands of a returning Norman Osborn who was revealed to be alive and has been pulling strings from the moment he was believed to have died. On that day, Peter felt to have lost a brother. Although Norman Osborn was defeated, it was far from the last thing that was heard from him. With his powers fully returned, Peter resumed his work as the Amazing Spider-Man once again.
Raimi was also initially slated to direct a fourth Spider-Man film, with a release date of May 6, 2011. The ill-fated movie was intended to continue with the same cast and crew with plot-lines established in the first three films. Disagreement between Raimi and producers Laura Ziskin and Avi Arad over the script -- and over the choice of villains in particular -- as well as concerns with the rising cost of production (Raimi and series star Tobey Maguire would have claimed a large portion of any film royalties) led to a cancellation of that film's production. Instead, the Sony owned Columbia Pictures decided on a reboot of the franchise.
In 1992, Marvel revealed that Northstar, a member of the Canadian mutant superhero team Alpha Flight, was homosexual, after years of implication.[58] This ended a long-standing editorial mandate that there would be no homosexual characters in Marvel comics.[59] Although some minor secondary characters in DC Comics' mature-audience 1980s miniseries Watchmen were gay, and the reformed supervillain Pied Piper came out to Wally West in an issue of The Flash in 1991, Northstar is considered to be the first openly gay superhero appearing in mainstream comic books. From the mid-2000s onward, several established Marvel and DC comics characters (or a variant version of the pre-existing character) were outed or reintroduced as LGBT individuals by both publishers. Examples include the Mikaal Tomas incarnation of Starman in 1998; Colossus in the Ultimate X-Men series; Renee Montoya in DC's Gotham Central series in 2003; the Kate Kane incarnation of Batwoman in 2006; Rictor and Shatterstar in an issue of X-Factor in 2009; the Golden Age Green Lantern Alan Scott is reimagined as openly gay following The New 52 reboot in 2011;[60][61] and in 2015, a younger time displaced version of Iceman in an issue of All-New X-Men.[62]
This series debuted on MTV and aired from July 11, 2003 through September 12, 2003. The series would continue where the successful live action feature film left off. The series starts with Peter already having his spider powers and follows his superhero adventures and his friends, Harry Osborn and Mary Jane Watson during their first year of college at Empire State University.
Jump up ^ Hörandner, Editha (2005). Halloween in der Steiermark und anderswo. LIT Verlag Münster. p. 99. ISBN 9783825888893. On the other hand the postmodern phenomenon of "antifashion" is also to be found in some Halloween costumes. Black and orange are a 'must' with many costumes. Halloween - like the medieval danse macabre - is closely connected with superstitions and it might be a way of dealing with death in a playful way.
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