i agree with steve, in that the first superhero i could think of was gilgamesh. i think what jason is stuck on here is the first comic book hero - not just a character who uses superhuman powers for good, but one whose tales were published in modern drawning. if it wasn’t just drawn, but told through modern media that defines a superhero for jason, wouldn’t the shadow preceed mandrake in his radio drama?
In an unidentified alternate universe, Peter and Ben Parker live together in a Latin & Spanish neighborhood and Ben is married to a Spanish Aunt May. When Ben got shot by a mugger, he had a blood transfusion with Peter and got his nephew's Spider-powers. When Ben became Spider-Man, he was a ruthless hero where he once severely beat up Kraven the Hunter. He along side Peter battled crime until Peter and May died from unknown reason.[81]
Howard seems to like Spiderman. During the gig in Bordeaux (France), on 31st October 2006 he wore a Spiderman disguise because it was Halloween. Then, during the last gig of 2006 in Antwerp (Belgium) on 19th December 2006, he wore it again. In both of them, Howard wore the whole disguise for the first song (Take a Bow) and then he took off the mask for the rest of the gig. The following year on April 15th, Dom wore the Spiderman outfit, sans mask, at Edgefest 16 in Frisco, TX. Dom also wore the Spiderman outfit during the last 'private' show of the Black Holes and Revelations tour in Christchurch, New Zealand. Also at KROQ's Almost Acoustic Christmas (December 9th, 2007), the last gig of 2007 and the very last gig of the Black Holes and Revelations tour he wore the infamous Spiderman outfit again. On October 2nd, a picture appeared on Muse's Twitter with the caption "dom ponders some new clothes".

In the X-Men Forever universe after the X-Men have faked their deaths, Spider-Man runs into Rogue during a patrol, Rogue having recently unintentionally absorbed Nightcrawler's powers and appearance. Testing her new powers, Rogue spends the night fighting crime alongside Spider-Man, later suggesting that the two kiss to see how her recent transformation has affected her original abilities. After Spider-Man assists the X-Men in destroying a group of Sentinels,[91] the X-Men return to the manor, Cyclops concluding that Spider-Man can be trusted to keep the secret of their continued survival.[92]
If you're a gym rat and you've got the six pack to show it, then we ALL know there's only one costume for you—a Greek Spartan warrior! You could be just like King Leonidas in The 300 and vanquish your opponents on the battlefield...or even defeat them on the dance floor if you know a move or two. And it won't matter if you're looking for admiration from goddesses, kings and queens, or your fellow warriors. Because when you're dressed in this costume, you're not going to be leaving a whole lot to the imagination!
^ Jump up to: a b Manning, Matthew K.; Gilbert, Laura, ed. (2012). "1960s". Spider-Man Chronicle Celebrating 50 Years of Web-Slinging. Dorling Kindersley. p. 24. ISBN 978-0756692360. Electro charged into Spider-Man's life for the first time in another [Stan] Lee and [Steve] Ditko effort that saw Peter Parker using his brilliant mind to outwit a foe.
Jump up ^ Armentrout, Donald S.; Slocum, Robert Boak (1999). An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church. Church Publishing, Inc. p. 7. ISBN 0898692113. Archived from the original on 30 July 2016. Retrieved 1 November 2012. The BOS notes that "suitable festivities and entertainments" may precede of follow the service, and there may be a visit to a cemetery or burial place.
In this universe, Peter's Uncle Ben does not die. Instead, he encourages Peter - otherwise known as the Amazing Spider - to create a machine that allows him to absorb the powers of counterparts from other realities, killing them in the process. Using this device, Peter becomes the most powerful person on Earth and capable of defeating the likes of Thanos. When 616 Spider-Man enters the Amazing Spider's reality, he tries to absorb Spider-Man's powers as well but is ultimately defeated when his Uncle Ben accidentally attaches the power absorbing machine to him.

Norman Osborn broke out of jail and managed to clear his name of being the Green Goblin. After failing to convert Peter into his heir, he started to provoke Peter into killing him in a story called A Death in the Family. Norman was sick of his life and wanted to die at the hands of Spider-man. He tried to get Peter so mad that he would do this. First by releasing footage of Gwen's death to the media, claiming that Gwen's death was the result of Spider-Man's selfish actions. To make matters worse, Norman forced a drunken Flash Thompson to have a car accident, causing him to go into a coma. Spider-Man and the Green Goblin meet up in one of Osborn's warehouses where Spider-Man defeats the Goblin. Although he urged him to finish him off, Peter refused to play the Goblin's game and proposed a truce. Norman accepts, but as he returns to one of his offices, he puts a gun in his mouth. He is however to afraid to pull the trigger.
After waking up, Peter discovered he possessed arachnid superpowers. Donning a mask, Peter confronted Norman Osborn in his home in order to get him to give up his hold over the city. However, Peter was shocked to discover Urich, who was revealed to have been blackmailing Osborn with his information on the mob boss in exchange for fueling his drug habit. Angered, Peter left Urich. Upon returning home, Peter created a costume based on his uncle's World War I-era airman uniform and became the vigilante Spider-Man.[2] Peter later returned to Urich's apartment to force him to help him to bring down the Goblin, only to find the reporter dead. Strengthened with resolve from his aunt and Urich's lover, Felicia Hardy — owner of the Black Cat club — Peter thwarted the Goblin's criminal operations.[3]
One superpowered character was portrayed as an antiheroine, a rarity for its time: the Black Widow, a costumed emissary of Satan who killed evildoers in order to send them to Hell—debuted in Mystic Comics #4 (Aug. 1940), from Timely Comics, the 1940s predecessor of Marvel Comics. Most of the other female costumed crime-fighters during this era lacked superpowers. Notable characters include The Woman in Red,[18][19] introduced in Standard Comics' Thrilling Comics #2 (March 1940); Lady Luck, debuting in the Sunday-newspaper comic-book insert The Spirit Section June 2, 1940; the comedic character Red Tornado, debuting in All-American Comics #20 (Nov 1940); Miss Fury,[20] debuting in the eponymous comic strip by female cartoonist Tarpé Mills on April 6, 1941; the Phantom Lady, introduced in Quality Comics Police Comics #1 (Aug. 1941); the Black Cat,[21][22] introduced in Harvey Comics' Pocket Comics #1 (also Aug. 1941); and the Black Canary, introduced in Flash Comics #86 (Aug. 1947) as a supporting character.[23] The most iconic comic book superheroine, who debuted during the Golden Age, is Wonder Woman.[24] Modeled from the myth of the Amazons of Greek mythology, she was created by psychologist William Moulton Marston, with help and inspiration from his wife Elizabeth and their mutual lover Olive Byrne.[25][26] Wonder Woman's first appearance was in All Star Comics #8 (Dec. 1941), published by All-American Publications, one of two companies that would merge to form DC Comics in 1944.
Jump up ^ Markstein, Don. "The Black Widow". Don Markstein's Toonopedia. Archived from the original on April 15, 2012. Retrieved July 26, 2013. Fantomah was the first female character in comics to use extraordinary powers in combatting evil. The Woman in Red was the first to wear a flashy costume and maintain a dual identity while doing so. On the other hand, The Black Widow was the first to do both.
A few days after amazing crowds numerous times, Peter was walking home when he saw a police car in front of his house. Wondering what was going on he asked the policeman what happened. He was shocked when he was told that his Uncle Ben was murdered by a burglar attempting to steal from the Parkers. Ben was shot after attempting to stop him, dying almost instantly. Furious, Peter donned his costume and set out for vengeance. Tracking the murderer to an abandoned warehouse, Spidey confronted the criminal, knocking out the man with one punch. When he looked at the fugitive's face he realized this burglar was the guy the security guard was chasing at the TV set! With his uncle paying the ultimate price for his inaction and indifference, he found out with great power comes great responsibility. From then on, Peter decided to use his newfound powers not for personal gain, but to fight crime and protect the innocent.
In 2005, after a four-year break from comic appearances, Captain Universe returned in the second series of Amazing Fantasy.[2] Also in 2005, a series of one-shot specials linked together by the Uni-Power/Captain Universe were released featuring different characters from the Marvel Universe as the Uni-Power each imbues them with power of Captain Universe. These titles were Captain Universe/Hulk, Captain Universe/Daredevil, Captain Universe/X-23, Captain Universe/Invisible Woman and Captain Universe/Silver Surfer. The Uni-Power made a brief appearance in Nextwave, he also made a "cameo" as Cosmic Spider-Man for the variant cover of Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man #3 and played an important part in the Death's Head 3.0 saga chronicled in Amazing Fantasy.
The Memory cloth is a piece of equipment that Bruce is shown by Lucius Fox at Applied Sciences. The item itself is normally soft and light, but when an electric current is passed through it the cape takes a rigid shape. Bruce took it, and the gloves then customized the skeleton and cut into bat wing shape scalloped cape and somehow made it a functional paraglider contraption.
Today's comic books are descendants of 19th-century "penny dreadful" serials. They were multi-part sensational stories printed on cheap paper and sold for, what else, a penny each. These stories became popular among the lower and working classes. They couldn't afford, and weren't interested in, the "important" literary novels of the day. Penny dreadfuls and the "dime novels" that followed them had clear-cut good-vs.-evil themes. And they weren't short on action or melodrama, either! By the early 20th century, we had such enduring characters as Tarzan and Zorro in "pulp" fiction. (So-called because of the inexpensive paper on which it was printed.) The first of the modern superheroes was Superman, who launched the Golden Age of Comics in 1938.  
In order to censor the Daily Bugle, Osborn kidnaps the editor J. Jonah Jameson and has the Chameleon assume his place. The Chameleon-as-Jameson goes to Urich’s apartment and shoots him, unaware that Felicia witnessed the murder. Hardy goes to the Daily Bugle offices and kills the Chameleon, leaving his body to be discovered by Spider-Man shortly before the arrival of the police.[3] Spider-Man escapes the attentions of the police and goes to his home, where he killed the Vulture, in order to stop him from murdering Aunt Parker. Despite saving his aunt, May criticized him for killing the Vulture, as he could have stopped him with his powers. She told Peter that killing people would make him less of what makes him human.[4]
Doc Ock knows that he is soon going to die. Before his death, he wants to be remembered as the man who saved the world by stopping the Greenhouse effect. Spider-man doesn't believe Octavius, however, so he gathers the Avengers in order to discover Ock's true plan and put a stop to it. Unknown to Spider-Man, Doctor Octopus was well prepared for the fight and the Sinister Six subdue the Avengers. Doc Ock is about to kill Spider-Man, but Silver Sable comes to the rescue. She saves Peter and the Black Widow, and they set off to Octavius' manufacturing plants. There they encounter the Sandman, but they manage to beat him. Doc Ock asked the nations to capture Spider-Man (his position enabled him to do so) and he also called on many villains to take down Spider-Man. Parker knows that he can't stop Otto alone, so he asks other heroes to destroys Ock's facilities. When Spider-Man, Black Widow, and Silver Sable reach the main base in Romania, Doctor Octopus activates his satellites and every area that faces the sun explodes. It later turns out that this was only an illusion created by Mysterio, rather than reality. Spider-Man captures Mysterio and finds out that Doc Ock is hiding in Guatemala, but after Pete, Silver, and Natasha arrive at the site they're attacked by a group of mind controlled Avengers. Spider-Man, Black Widow, and Silver Sable gain an edge because the mind controlled Avengers are unable to fight as well as they would normally, and the Avengers are able to return to their senses thanks to Mysterio's technology. Black Widow was knocked out during the fight, however. Doctor Octopus launched several missiles so the Red Hulk, Iron Man, and Thor try to put an end to it. Mysterio reveals that Octavius' base is underwater, so Spider-Man and Sable resolve to put an end to Otto's plot once and for all. They unfortunately meet Rhino on their way, and he catches Sable and begins choking her in the water. With her final breath, Silver tells Peter to leave her and stop Otto. Spider-man is desperate to help her, but he knows that he's running out of time and is left with no choice. Spider-Man finally finds and battles Octavius, but he is eventually caught in the Doc's metal tentacles. With Parker trapped, Octavius reveals that his plan is to scar the earth, to be worse than Hitler and the other monsters, and in that way be remembered. Octopus removes his armor in order to activate his master plan, but Spider-Man tells Doc Ock that he had made an error in allowing himself to be distracted just long enough for Peter to break free. Spider-Man saves both Doctor Octopus and the world, but at the cost of Silver Sable's life.
"If This Be My Destiny...!" (1965) "Green Goblin Reborn!" (1971) "The Six Arms Saga" (1971) "The Night Gwen Stacy Died" (1973) "Nothing Can Stop the Juggernaut!" (1982) "The Kid Who Collects Spider-Man" (1984) "Secret Wars" (1984) "Alien Costume Saga" (1984) "The Death of Jean DeWolff" (1985) "The Wedding!" (1987) "Kraven's Last Hunt" (1987) "Torment" (1990) "Invasion of the Spider-Slayers" (1992) "Maximum Carnage" (1993) "Clone Saga" (1994) "Identity Crisis" (1998) "The Gathering of Five" and "The Final Chapter" (1998) "Flowers for Rhino" (2001) "The Other" (2005) "Back in Black" (2007) "One More Day" (2007) "Brand New Day" (2008) "New Ways to Die" (2008) "Spidey Meets the President!" (2009)" "The Gauntlet" and "Grim Hunt" (2009) "One Moment in Time" (2010) "Big Time" (2010) "Spider-Island" (2011) "Ends of the Earth" (2012) "Dying Wish" (2012) "Spider-Verse" (2014) "Dead No More: The Clone Conspiracy" (2016) "Spider-Geddon" (2018)
Halloween activities include trick-or-treating (or the related guising), attending Halloween costume parties, carving pumpkins into jack-o'-lanterns, lighting bonfires, apple bobbing, divination games, playing pranks, visiting haunted attractions, telling scary stories, and watching horror films. In many parts of the world, the Christian religious observances of All Hallows' Eve, including attending church services and lighting candles on the graves of the dead, remain popular,[21][22][23] although elsewhere it is a more commercial and secular celebration.[24][25][26] Some Christians historically abstained from meat on All Hallows' Eve, a tradition reflected in the eating of certain vegetarian foods on this vigil day, including apples, potato pancakes, and soul cakes.[27][28][29][30]
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