The Iron Spider armor also has a secret override that can be activated by Iron Man in case of emergencies or if Spider-Man ever switches sides (which he does in Civil War #5). However, unknown to Stark, Peter was already aware of the safety measure and had bypassed it with his own override, Password Surprise. Perhaps most sinister, Stark discovered a way to give his own Iron Man armor a "spider-sense" based on Peter's, and the ability to give Spider-Man's sense red herrings.
Unlike well known rivalries in comics book depictions where heroes always still have more than one enemy but usually one archenemy (e.g., Joker, to Batman in DC Comics, Red Skull to Captain America, Doctor Doom to the Fantastic Four and the Brotherhood of Mutants to the X-Men in Marvel Comics etc.), Spider-Man is known to have three archenemies and it can be debated or disputed as to which one is worse:[123]
He first appeared as a Peter Parker double emerging from one of the Jackal's pods that initially an amnesiac but later believed himself to be the real Peter Parker, having been kept in stasis since the first Clone Saga. He claimed that both Peter Parker and Ben Reilly were his clones. However, upon meeting Parker, Reilly and Kaine, the Jackal's programming kicked in and he went insane before shapeshifting into a freakish giant, therefore revealing his true status as a clone. In denial of the truth, he tried to kill the "clones" and to claim Peter Parker's life as his own. He was even infatuated with Parker's wife Mary Jane Watson and seeks to have her as his bride. Since their first encounter, Reilly realizes that Spidercide is twisted from the start and expresses disgust of his corrupted doppelgänger's immorality, tauntingly refers him as "Freakface" once the villainous clone's shapeshifting powers manifest. However, this also causes Reilly to be afraid of his and Parker's capabilities for wicked if they allow themselves demoralize as Spidercide.
Object-oriented programming (OOP) is a common and powerful programming paradigm that heavily incorporates ideas of abstraction. Abstraction allows programmers to write code that shows the essential features of a piece of software without including the background details. Some common object-oriented programming languages include Python, Java, Ruby, and C++. Object-oriented programming languages often use classes, which group objects, attributes, and methods together for user-friendly and modular programming.
Monty Walsh Montgomery Walsh Marvel Spotlight Vol. 2 #11 (1981) A cat burglar. He became Captain Universe after he was shot when trying to rob the house of a former Maggia boss named Guido Carboni. After Montgomery defeated Guido Carboni, the Enigma Power left him as Montgomery dies and the police find Guido raving that the dead man was Captain Universe.
From at least the 16th century,[5] the festival included mumming and guising,[6] which involved people going house-to-house in costume (or in disguise), usually reciting verses or songs in exchange for food.[6] It may have originally been a tradition whereby people impersonated the Aos Sí, or the souls of the dead, and received offerings on their behalf. Impersonating these beings, or wearing a disguise, was also believed to protect oneself from them.[7] It is suggested that the mummers and guisers "personify the old spirits of the winter, who demanded reward in exchange for good fortune".[8] F. Marian McNeill suggests the ancient pagan festival included people wearing masks or costumes to represent the spirits, and that faces were marked (or blackened) with ashes taken from the sacred bonfire.[5] In parts of southern Ireland, a man dressed as a Láir Bhán (white mare) led youths house-to-house reciting verses—some of which had pagan overtones—in exchange for food. If the household donated food it could expect good fortune from the 'Muck Olla'; not doing so would bring misfortune.[9] In 19th century Scotland, youths went house-to-house with masked, painted or blackened faces, often threatening to do mischief if they were not welcomed.[6] In parts of Wales, men went about dressed as fearsome beings called gwrachod,[6] while in some places, young people cross-dressed.[6] Elsewhere in Europe, mumming and costumes were part of other yearly festivals. However, in the Celtic-speaking regions they were "particularly appropriate to a night upon which supernatural beings were said to be abroad and could be imitated or warded off by human wanderers".[6] It has also been suggested that the wearing of Halloween costumes developed from the custom of souling, which was practised by Christians in parts of Western Europe from at least the 15th century.[10][11] At Allhallowtide, groups of poor people would go door-to-door, collecting soul cakes – either as representatives of the dead,[12] or in return for saying prayers for them.[13] One 19th century English writer said it "used to consist of parties of children, dressed up in fantastic costume, who went round to the farm houses and cottages, signing a song, and begging for cakes (spoken of as "Soal-cakes"), apples, money, or anything that the goodwives would give them".[14] The soulers typically asked for "mercy on all Christian souls for a soul cake".[15] The practice was mentioned by Shakespeare his play The Two Gentlemen of Verona (1593).[16][17] Christian minister Prince Sorie Conteh wrote on the wearing of costumes: "It was traditionally believed that the souls of the departed wandered the earth until All Saints' Day, and All Hallows' Eve provided one last chance for the dead to gain vengeance on their enemies before moving to the next world. In order to avoid being recognised by any soul that might be seeking such vengeance, people would don masks or costumes to disguise their identities".[18] In the Middle Ages, statues and relics of martyred saints were paraded through the streets at Allhallowtide. Some churches who could not afford these things had people dress as saints instead.[19][20] Some believers continue the practice of dressing as saints, biblical figures, and reformers in Halloween celebrations today.[21] Many Christians in continental Europe, especially in France, believed that on Halloween "the dead of the churchyards rose for one wild, hideous carnival," known as the danse macabre, which has often been depicted in church decoration.[22] An article published by Christianity Today claimed the danse macabre was enacted at village pageants and at court masques, with people "dressing up as corpses from various strata of society", and suggested this was the origin of Halloween costume parties.[23][24]
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