A teen outcast Andy Maguire went on a trip from his school to Horizon Labs, where Peter Parker was holding an experiment. Tiberius Stone, not liking Peter, sabotages the experiment, and Andy is hit with a ray of Peter Particles. Soon after he discovers he has super-powers. When he is examined by top greatest superhuman specialists, Reed Richards, Tony Stark, Henry Pym and Hank McCoy, they discover that he has energy projection, flight, super speed, super strength and force field, but his limitation is he can control only one power at a time. Reed tells Peter that he had discovered these particles, but didn't publish his work, because he considered the particles too powerful and dangerous. He then assigns Alpha as Spider-Man's sidekick. Alpha is however very careless and eventually quits working with Spider-Man and goes solo. Spider-Man decides then that there should be Alpha no more! Soon when earth is under attack from Terminus, Alpha is called from Captain America to fight him. During the fight Alpha behaves most irresponsible and almost destroys planes flying in the air. Though Alpha defeats Terminus, Peter observes that Terminus' staff can redirect Alpha energy. Then Spider-Man calls Alpha for another "analysis" and uses the tech acquired from the Terminus to strip Andy of his Alpha power, leaving him as nobody again.

Can there be a Halloween without an awesome superhero costume? Yeah, we didn’t think so. You can’t even think of playing tricks or getting all the treats without sporting a classic Marvel or DC Comics costume. Don’t forget — this has been an amazing time for heroes and heroines from all of our fave comic books and movies. From Wonder Woman to Black Panther and everything in-between, now is the time to unleash your inner crime-fighting alter ego. We fully expect to see a slew of Jokers like never before, along with tons of exciting newcomers, like our fave Spider Chick. So whether you are a caped crusader or a vile villain, here are some epic costume ideas for your Halloween night.


In 1962, Marvel Comics editor and head writer Stan Lee was looking for a new superhero idea. He decided to create Spider-Man as a character with whom teens could identify, as there was a recent surge in teenage demand for comics. Lee was supposedly inspired for the concept of Spider-Man after observing a spider climb up a wall. Lee had to convince publisher Martin Goodman to introduce Spider-Man in the last issue of the canceled series Amazing Adult Fantasy, which was renamed Amazing Fantasy for that issue (#15, Aug. 1962). Lee then approached legendary artist Jack Kirby for an initial character design. However Lee was dissatisfied with Kirby’s attempt as the character turned out to be too heroic and Spider-Man was supposed to be a teenage boy. Lee then turned to Steve Ditko who developed the now iconic look of Spider-Man.
In issue #121 (June 1973),[49] the Green Goblin throws Gwen Stacy from a tower of either the Brooklyn Bridge (as depicted in the art) or the George Washington Bridge (as given in the text).[58][59] She dies during Spider-Man's rescue attempt; a note on the letters page of issue #125 states: "It saddens us to say that the whiplash effect she underwent when Spidey's webbing stopped her so suddenly was, in fact, what killed her."[60] The following issue, the Goblin appears to kill himself accidentally in the ensuing battle with Spider-Man.[61]
After being defeated on two more occasions by Spider-Man, Doctor Octopus became more determined to defeat his foe and formed the Sinister Six, a group consisting of five other villains who all share the same grudge against the young hero. Ock had each villain face Spider-Man individually so that every member could reap the glory of Spider-Man's death, but he secretly devised this plan to ensure the other villains' defeat each time. After rendering Spider-Man tired, Otto lured him to a fight by kidnapping Aunt May and Betty Brant. Despite everything, Spider-Man came out victorious and saved the two hostages. On his high school graduation, Spider-Man battled the Molten Man, who would turn out to be the stepbrother of Liz Allen. During his early career, Spider-Man would frequently team up with other heroes such as Daredevil, the X-Men, the Fantastic Four, and the Human Torch in particular. Peter and Betty broke up after her brother was killed. She couldn't bear the thought of losing another loved one as she feared that Peter would die while taking pictures of Spider-Man. She later settled in with Ned Leeds.
After the war, Peter remains a fugitive and his Aunt May is shot by a sniper hired by the Kingpin. Peter finds himself in a place he has never been before. He dons his black costume and goes on a rampage to find his aunt's shooter. May has fallen into a coma and is in critical condition. Eventually Peter discovers that the Kingpin is the man responsible and tracks the crime-lord to Riker's Island Prison. He savagely beats Fisk to a bloody pulp but decides to leave him with his humiliating defeat as it's worse than death for Fisk. Peter warns the other inmates to stay away from his family and tells Fisk that when May dies, Peter will come back and finish him. Since Spider-Man is a fugitive, he is unable to get proper help for May and is forced to commit felonies to try and save her, before realizing that he has finally become what he has spent his life fighting, a criminal.
There are several trading cards depicting either Captain Universe himself or Spider-Man as Captain Universe, these trading card sets include Marvel VS., Marvel Overpower, the Fleer Mark Bagley Spider-Man Card Set and Fleer Ultra 1994. There was also a special Captain Universe trading card included with the personalized X-Men/Captain Universe comic depicting the comic book owner's personal stats as Captain Universe.[31]
I wonder, and I am not trying to be provocative: Is there no room anymore for a child or young person to be a little bit obnoxious... a little bit inappropriate or provocative or, yes, offensive? American universities were once a safe space not only for maturation but also for a certain regressive, or even transgressive, experience; increasingly, it seems, they have become places of censure and prohibition. And the censure and prohibition come from above, not from yourselves! Are we all okay with this transfer of power? Have we lost faith in young people's capacity—in your capacity ­ to exercise self­censure, through social norming, and also in your capacity to ignore or reject things that trouble you?
With Halloween just around the corner, it is time to find the best costume for all sorts of spooky, trick-or-treating and fun times. We offer a wide variety of boy’s costumes, fit for everyone’s needs. Delve through our entire catalog of cool costumes for upcoming events. Go for a blast from the past in various decades or historic ensembles. There are new additions such as Black Panther and Ant-Man, based on the huge 2018 blockbuster hits.
One superpowered character was portrayed as an antiheroine, a rarity for its time: the Black Widow, a costumed emissary of Satan who killed evildoers in order to send them to Hell—debuted in Mystic Comics #4 (Aug. 1940), from Timely Comics, the 1940s predecessor of Marvel Comics. Most of the other female costumed crime-fighters during this era lacked superpowers. Notable characters include The Woman in Red,[18][19] introduced in Standard Comics' Thrilling Comics #2 (March 1940); Lady Luck, debuting in the Sunday-newspaper comic-book insert The Spirit Section June 2, 1940; the comedic character Red Tornado, debuting in All-American Comics #20 (Nov 1940); Miss Fury,[20] debuting in the eponymous comic strip by female cartoonist Tarpé Mills on April 6, 1941; the Phantom Lady, introduced in Quality Comics Police Comics #1 (Aug. 1941); the Black Cat,[21][22] introduced in Harvey Comics' Pocket Comics #1 (also Aug. 1941); and the Black Canary, introduced in Flash Comics #86 (Aug. 1947) as a supporting character.[23] The most iconic comic book superheroine, who debuted during the Golden Age, is Wonder Woman.[24] Modeled from the myth of the Amazons of Greek mythology, she was created by psychologist William Moulton Marston, with help and inspiration from his wife Elizabeth and their mutual lover Olive Byrne.[25][26] Wonder Woman's first appearance was in All Star Comics #8 (Dec. 1941), published by All-American Publications, one of two companies that would merge to form DC Comics in 1944.
After the war, Peter remains a fugitive and his Aunt May is shot by a sniper hired by the Kingpin. Peter finds himself in a place he has never been before. He dons his black costume and goes on a rampage to find his aunt's shooter. May has fallen into a coma and is in critical condition. Eventually Peter discovers that the Kingpin is the man responsible and tracks the crime-lord to Riker's Island Prison. He savagely beats Fisk to a bloody pulp but decides to leave him with his humiliating defeat as it's worse than death for Fisk. Peter warns the other inmates to stay away from his family and tells Fisk that when May dies, Peter will come back and finish him. Since Spider-Man is a fugitive, he is unable to get proper help for May and is forced to commit felonies to try and save her, before realizing that he has finally become what he has spent his life fighting, a criminal.
Peter Parker, the amazing Spider-Man, has made an astonishing discovery-he has a sister! Unfortunately, a manipulative super-villain known as the Gentleman-who had a hand in the deaths of Peter's parents-has somehow brainwashed her into becoming the deadly supervilainess known as Pity! Together with Doctor Octopus, Electro, the Vulture, and Mysterio, they've formed the newest incarnation of the super-villain group dedicated to destroy Spider-Man, the Sinister Six! But there is something more than just the death of Spider-Man on the Sinister Six's agenda; something that has caused Col. Sean Morgan and his high-tech anti-espionage agents of S.A.F.E. to become involved. Spider-Man teams up with Morgan to stop the Sinister Six before they can put their world-threatening plan in motion, and to save his sister before it's too late!
In the Amalgam Comics continuity, Spider-Man was combined with DC's Superboy to create Spider-Boy. He was featured in Spider-Boy #1 (April 1996) and Spider-Boy Team-Up #1 (June 1997). In this continuity, Spider-Boy is the clone of researcher Peter Parker, created during an explosion in the Project Cadmus Labs. Adopted by Cadmus director General Thunderbolt Ross, he is given the name "Pete Ross". Spider-Boy's power is the ability to redirect his own personal gravity, giving him the ability to climb walls, and to increase his strength. He is able to shoot webs using a special "Web Gun" developed by Cadmus. Spider-Boy is an honorary member of the Legion of Galactic Guardians 2099 (an amalgamation of DC's Legion of Super-Heroes and Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy plus the Marvel 2099 timeline). He is seen in the background during Spider-Verse to fight the Inheritors.

Jump up ^ Thomson, Thomas; Annandale, Charles (1896). A History of the Scottish People from the Earliest Times: From the Union of the kingdoms, 1706, to the present time. Blackie. Archived from the original on 21 June 2013. Retrieved 31 October 2011. Of the stated rustic festivals peculiar to Scotland the most important was Hallowe'en, a contraction for All-hallow Evening, or the evening of All-Saints Day, the annual return of which was a season for joy and festivity.
Spider-Man has had a large range of supporting characters introduced in the comics that are essential in the issues and storylines that star him. After his parents died, Peter Parker was raised by his loving aunt, May Parker, and his uncle and father figure, Ben Parker. After Uncle Ben is murdered by a burglar, Aunt May is virtually Peter's only family, and she and Peter are very close.[45]

Many new openly gay, lesbian and bisexual characters have since emerged in superhero fiction, such as Gen¹³'s Rainmaker, Apollo and Midnighter of The Authority, and Wiccan and Hulkling of the Young Avengers. Notable transgender or gender bending characters are fewer in number by comparison: the alter ego of superheroine Zsazsa Zaturnnah, a seminal character in Philippine popular culture,[63] is an effeminate gay man who transforms into a female superhuman after ingesting a magical stone. Desire from Neil Gaiman's The Sandman series and Xavin from the Runaways are both characters who could (and often) change their gender at will. Alysia Yeoh, a supporting character created by writer Gail Simone for the Batgirl ongoing series published by DC Comics, received substantial media attention in 2011 for being the first major transgender character written in a contemporary context in a mainstream American comic book.[64]
At Horizons Labs, the combination of a well paying job and access to numerous tech has allowed Peter to expand on the equipment he uses. So far he has developed a Spider-Glider, Thermodynamic Foam, Cryo Pellets, voice activated web-shooters and various types of webbing, including magnetic and acidic variants. Many of the equipment have usage in day-to-day usage as well- for example the cryo pellet technology was used to help keep organs and limbs viable for longer periods of time. The Thermodynamic foam also has use in the stopping and prevention of fires.

Spider-Man found members of the Vulture's gang near an empty gas station. Using the suit's advanced function to overhear their conversation, Spider-Man learned that Vulture intended to steal confiscated technology from Damage Control storage trucks. Spider-Man went after the Damage Control truck and confronted the Vulture, who was about to leave with his loot. They fought briefly and, due to Spider-Man's carelessness, resulted in Spider-Man getting trapped inside the truck.[2]
Sometime later, Spider-Man revealed his identity to the Black Cat who would end up breaking up with him. She was unable to bear the fact that Spider-Man liked to live a civilian life as Peter Parker instead of staying in costume. Mary Jane would return to New York and she visited Peter in his apartment. Meanwhile, the Puma had tracked down Spider-Man but Peter sensed his presence using his spider-sense.
The feast of All Hallows', on its current date in the Western Church, may be traced to Pope Gregory III's (731–741) founding of an oratory in St Peter's for the relics "of the holy apostles and of all saints, martyrs and confessors".[76][77] In 835, All Hallows' Day was officially switched to 1 November, the same date as Samhain, at the behest of Pope Gregory IV.[78] Some suggest this was due to Celtic influence, while others suggest it was a Germanic idea,[78] although it is claimed that both Germanic and Celtic-speaking peoples commemorated the dead at the beginning of winter.[79] They may have seen it as the most fitting time to do so, as it is a time of 'dying' in nature.[78][79] It is also suggested that the change was made on the "practical grounds that Rome in summer could not accommodate the great number of pilgrims who flocked to it", and perhaps because of public health considerations regarding Roman Fever – a disease that claimed a number of lives during the sultry summers of the region.[80]
In the episode "Traction," the Batman is badly injured by the immensely powerful Bane, due to which he is forced to build a prototype called the "Batbot" to battle the villain. Bruce Wayne controls the Batbot while sitting inside the cockpit. It is shown to possess the superhuman strength to match that of Bane, along with enhanced levels of agility and endurance. It has two turbos retro-thrusters flight on its back as well. The Batbot is also shown to be controlled via the Batman's utility belt (for example, in "The Cat and the Bat" episode).
It is widely believed that many Halloween traditions originated from ancient Celtic harvest festivals, particularly the Gaelic festival Samhain; that such festivals may have had pagan roots; and that Samhain itself was Christianized as Halloween by the early Church.[12][13][14][15][16] Some believe, however, that Halloween began solely as a Christian holiday, separate from ancient festivals like Samhain.[17][18][19][20]
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